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Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult (Disinformation Guides) Paperback – October 1, 2008


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Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult (Disinformation Guides) + Liber Null & Psychonaut: An Introduction to Chaos Magic + Condensed Chaos: An Introduction to Chaos Magic
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Product Details

  • Series: Disinformation Guides
  • Paperback: 352 pages
  • Publisher: Disinformation Books; 1ST edition (October 1, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 097139427X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0971394278
  • Product Dimensions: 8.3 x 0.9 x 10.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (29 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #714,595 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"In the apparent derangement of our times, this book is both a call to arms and a armory also. Read on, get tooled up, get up there. . . and start bending reality" --Grant Morrison --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

From the Publisher

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult

Edited by Richard Metzger

Published by Disinformation Books

Oversized Softcover • 352 Pages • ISBN 097139427X

An alchemical formula to rip a hole in the fabric of reality.

Customer Reviews

This one is great for finding out a little about everything and leaving with your head still screwed on straight.
Mark Reddy
Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult is a collection of essays and articles by leading voices in the occult world.
Warner Scroggins
All in all the book is very well put together, with a lot of detail, good editing and nice illustrations and pictures.
E. M. Hodge

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

73 of 77 people found the following review helpful By Warner Scroggins on December 19, 2005
Format: Paperback
If the occultophobes of the world had any sense, they would leave the Harry Potter series alone and forget all about it. THIS is the book they should be trying to burn.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult is a collection of essays and articles by leading voices in the occult world. A total of 40 written pieces take up roughly 350 pages here. A small sampling of these includes Phil Hine on magical initiation, Donald Tyson on the Enochian Apocalypse, and Boyd Rice on the connections between the Biblical Leviathan and the mythic Dagon.

An entire section is devoted to the infamous Aleister Crowley, his life's work, and those who took his ideas and ran with them. Fiction writer Grant Morrison (The Invisibles) delivers his philosophy on modern magickal practice as a lifestyle. Erik Davis discusses the fiction of H.P. Lovecraft and its significance to the practicing occultist. Tau Allen Greenfield debunks the popular history of Wicca.

This book reprints an interview with late Church of Satan founder Anton LaVey by author/musician Michael Moynihan (Lords of Chaos, Blood Axis) and Dr. Stephen Flowers's essay "The Secret of the Gothick God of Darkness." Only Robert Mason's article on the "Ahriman Consciousness" seems strangely out of place; it reads more like a vaguely Christianized version of David Icke's conspiracy theories than the work of a practicing magician.

Be advised this is not a "spellbook" as such; a few articles give practical advice for starting points and point the way to further study, but the book as a whole is an exhibit, not a seminar. But it's a very well-assembled and stimulating exhibit; read it to learn, evaluate, and be inspired.
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45 of 49 people found the following review helpful By E. M. Hodge on April 16, 2006
Format: Paperback
Because I consider it my duty to buy any book with the words "Magick" or "Occult" in the title, I picked this one up against my better judgement. On the whole, my initial fears were that this would be cartoonish, poorly written and obtuse. Even the name, cribbed from one of Aleister Crowley's works, worried me. That being said, I am very lucky that I purchased this book anyway.

Richard Metzger, the compiler and editor of this collection, has done the occult world a great service by bringing together this series of articles and publishing them in one soft cover. Containing the works of authors such as William S. Burroughs, Aleister Crowley, Anton LaVey, Timothy Leary, Donald Tyson and Robert Anton Wilson, this collection isn't any sort of theoretical discussion of magic. What you'll find here instead is a series of examples from fairly famous people who have actually practiced magic.

Many people who've been practicing or living magically for some time will still have a lot to learn from this book, just as I did. The examples are eye-opening in some cases, and at the very least thought-provoking in others. I often found myself saying "Wow... I've never thought of doing it THAT way."

My only real objection is the heavy emphasis on the use of illegal and illicit drugs. I understand that the use of these substances has been linked very closely with the occult, especially in the United States, but the way this book seems to promote the use of these substances upsets me. Still, there are enough examples of magic without drugs to satisfy my tastes.

All in all the book is very well put together, with a lot of detail, good editing and nice illustrations and pictures. I whole-heartedly recommend it to students of magic from intermediate to advanced. Beginner's might want to get a little more grounding before experimenting with some of these ideas, though. Good luck!
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28 of 29 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on December 24, 2003
Format: Paperback
Intuition drove me to buy this book: I've always been skeptical about anything containing the words "magick" and "occult", as western propaganda is effective at doing its work, and they still aren't words I would use if I wrote a book on the topics deployed in the Book of Lies.
This book talks about philosophy, social change, drugs, history, mind and conscience, world abstraction,... I was gladly surprised by many of the articles, but I think the one which describes best what this book is about is "Are you illuminated?" by Phil Hine, which depicts the process in which westerners get near the edge of their own culture and begin a journey which penetrates deeper beyond the bounds of normal life and can initiate a process of self-destruction in our highly structured lives.
I used to think about Buddhism as a godless philosophy disguised as a religion; now I'll have to review my concepts on "western magick", and acknowledge the very reason why it is called "Occult".
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24 of 28 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 10, 2004
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Even if you have a bookcase full of every stripe of esoterica (and really, how many times did you need the LBRP explained to you, anyway?), you will find unique and varied wonders to entertain and delight you in this fantastic anthology. Really, there is nothing else like it in print.
On the other hand, if you are just starting to explore magick and the occult (and lean more towards William Blake and William Burroughs than heavy metal), this is a wonderful, literate place to start.
Finally, if you simply enjoy reading intelligent writing about revolutionary ideas and individuals, you'll find plenty here to interest you.
This anthology almost makes up for the fact that you can't find archived episodes of "Infinity Factory" on the web anymore.
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