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The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah (New International Commentary on the Old Testament) Hardcover


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The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah, and Micah (New International Commentary on the Old Testament) + Word Biblical Commentary Vol. 31, Hosea-Jonah + Obadiah, Jonah and Micah (Tyndale Old Testament Commentaries)
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Product Details

  • Series: New International Commentary on the Old Testament
  • Hardcover: 427 pages
  • Publisher: William B. Eerdmans Publishing Company; 2nd edition (December 12, 1994)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0802825311
  • ISBN-13: 978-0802825315
  • Product Dimensions: 9.6 x 6.6 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (3 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #100,442 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Quentin D. Stewart on October 20, 2010
Format: Hardcover
One can often get the entire Old Testament series of The New International Commentary on the Old Testament (NICOT) at a very good price at times through such carriers as CBD, though Amazon's price here is quite good as well. I took the plunge and bought the entire series, and was pleased to discover that this commentary - as the individual commentaries of any series always vary in quality - is quite helpful regarding Micah and Jonah. I have not yet seen how Allen treats Joel or Obadiah. Allen's treatment of Jonah is quite insightful, though some of his conclusions might not please all conservative Bible readers. Allen treats Jonah as a prophetic narrative, but mostly emphasizes it is a parable with tinges of allegory and compares it to Jesus' parables of the Prodigal Son (Jonah being the elder brother) and the Ungrateful Steward of Matthew 20. Allen believes Jonah is something of a corrective to the ethnocentric bigotry one sees in Ezra and Nehemiah and that it was probably written during the Persian period arguing there are Persian practices such as the repentance of the animals in Nineveh, and Aramaisms in the book that place it around the year 400 BC, though the historical Jonah lived circa 780 BC under Jeroboam II. Allen recognizes its value as a proto-missiological tract in the O.T. that seeks to shatter post-exilic Jews of ethnocentric bigotry and myopia. The theology of Jonah is summed up in verse 1:9 and 4:2 and climaxes in 4:11, and Allen notes the book is full of surprises such as the violent storm, the prophet turning tail and running, Jonah as a parody of Elijah, the submarine of a fish, the shocking conversion of Nineveh and the "magical" plant.Read more ›
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Richard Hogaboam on January 10, 2008
Format: Hardcover
Allen, L.C. (1976). The Books of Joel, Obadiah, Jonah and Micah. Grand Rapids, MI: Eerdmans.

This commentary is a valuable contribution to the respected New International Commentary Set on the Old Testament. Allen covers all his bases and hits a grand slam with his treatment of the prophet Joel.

He dives deep into the murky waters of dating the book of Joel. There are numerous well thought proposals for possible dates, all of which have strengths and weaknesses. At the end of the day Allen opts for an early post-exilic date, citing the works of both J.M. Myers and G.W. Ahlstrom.

With regards to the mysterious caricature of the locusts, Allen opts for a literal understanding of locust invasion and havoc. Alenn enumerates. "It is significant that the locusts behave in a literal manner: they ravage fields, trees, and fruit, but do not kill or plunder, or take prisoners of war....[T]o conceive of figurative locusts who are like the soldiers they are supposed to represent is a torturous and improbable interpretation" (1976:29).

As for the main theological themes that permeate the book of Joel, the `Day of Yahweh' stands at the forefront. Allen notes that judgment was in fact present upon the nation Israel in the plague of locusts, "...the very existence of the community was at stake and the annihilation of Israel was a real possibility. This seemed to be the end. If the locusts persisted, Israel would be no more. In eschatological terms the present plague was a harbinger, or the first phase, of the Day of Yahweh" (1976:36).

It was this very real threat of annihilation that prompted Joel's call for lament and repentance.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I was looking for a commentary of thye book of Micah for the final work of my theological master degrree, and I bought this book. I think it has a lot of importan data of the context of the book, that help to understand the point of view of Micah about the rich opression on the poor people.

I widely recomend this book
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