Buy Used
$3.98
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: While this book has been loved by someone else, they left it in great condition. Hurry and buy it before someone else does and take advantage of our FREE Super Saver Shipping!!! (there is a chance this book could contain a gift inscription)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Booth Paperback – March 30, 2010


See all 2 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, March 30, 2010
$2.24 $0.01
Best%20Books%20of%202014
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
12 Days of Kindle Book Deals
Load your library with Amazon's editors' picks, $2.99 or less each today only. Learn more

Product Details

  • Paperback: 176 pages
  • Publisher: First Second; First Edition edition (March 30, 2010)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1596431253
  • ISBN-13: 978-1596431256
  • Product Dimensions: 6.4 x 0.5 x 8.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 2.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,660,770 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From School Library Journal

Grade 9 Up—The life of notorious John Wilkes Booth receives a striking adaptation. The tagline—"Actor, Lover, Idealist…Assassin"—summarizes the book's approach. The text follows Booth's life, starting with his early years as he strove to make his own way in the world, to his success as an actor, his doomed romances, his increasing role in the anti-abolitionist underground, and finally to the physically broken fugitive he became. The great trick that the book pulls off is managing to create empathy for Booth, despite his flaws and crimes. Along the way, readers receive glimpses of Lincoln-era American life, from the ornate estates of the upper class, to the bawdy taverns of the under classes. The artwork by French artist Tanitoc is looser in style than most North American readers will be used to, but the bold and strategic color palette is compelling. Due to the artistic style and the relatively small size of the overall work, characters' faces are sometimes hard to distinguish, although color is often used to differentiate them.—Douglas P. Davey, Halton Hills Public Library, Ontario, Canada
(c) Copyright 2010. Library Journals LLC, a wholly owned subsidiary of Media Source, Inc. No redistribution permitted.

From Booklist

President Lincoln’s assassin had a complicated psychology and deep-dyed allegiance to the Confederate cause. Historian Colbert has scripted an engaging and insight-provoking portrait of John Wilkes Booth from youth through his demise, exploring his relationships with women of high and low esteem, competition with his brother both on- and offstage, and the cloak-and-dagger conspiracies that were part of nineteenth-century spy circles. Graphic-novelist and scholar Tanitoc’s luminous full-color art shows details of landscape, architecture, dress, and posture; his people’s faces are rarely beautiful but show finely tuned individuality. This is an engaging read for literary graphic-novel fans and also for historical-fiction readers just beginning to get acquainted with the graphic-novel format. --Francisca Goldsmith

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

2.4 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Alex C. Telander on October 31, 2010
Format: Paperback
C. C. Colbert has been an American history teacher and has published over twenty books on the subject. Acknowledging the changing times, he has now written an in-depth graphic novel on John Wilkes Booth, illustrated by the French bande desinée (graphic novel) artist, Tanitoc. In his author's note, Colbert admits it is historical fiction, but tells the reader he did the research and is keeping it as accurate as possible. The art style has a grainy, sketchy look, making it seem like something old and dated, while the faces look realistic. At times the storyline gets a little convoluted, and the reader may loose their way - especially when many of the men's faces look very similar - the overall story of Booth's siding with the Confederacy and the plot and assassination of Lincoln are well understood. The book even goes further, covering the eventual capture and execution of Booth and his co-assassins, as well as exploring his romantic relationships, and his secret dealings. Booth is another fun and interesting graphic novel about an important person in American history that is both accurately written and well illustrated.

Originally written on March 19th 2010 ©Alex C. Telander.

Originally published in the Sacramento Book Review.

For over 500 book reviews and exclusive author interviews, go to [...].
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Tim Lasiuta on May 13, 2010
Format: Paperback
Exactly who was John Wilkies Booth?
History would tell us plainly that he was Abraham Lincoln's assassin, and that he was part of a conspiracy, and one of a family of actors.
C.C. Colbert and Tanitoc shed light on a man who was seemingly more complex than previously known. Msr Colbert, after exhaustive research, has created an exhilarating narrative that shows the evolution of a revolutionary. As he states in his after comments, he was able to deviate from the `facts' and imagine what might have been. If he were alive today, Johnny Booth would have been just another protestor lining up to take verbal shots at Bush, then later Obama, and right alongside Oberman. What is titillating about the entire book is the political machinations that we would today call `Al Qaida' .
For a first time graphic novelist prompted on by his family, the effort is outstanding. The art, while seemingly crude (perhaps it's the brush heavy style) matches the narrative.

In the book, we encounter the Booth family of actors, brother, father, and brother. We meet his `women', Ella and Lucy. We meet the shadow conspiracy along with Mrs Surratt, Davy, Dr Mudd, and a diverse supporting cast caught up in post civil war/election-inauguration furor.
I can just imagine what a book on Louis Riel by C.C. Colbert would be like.
Tim Lasiuta
[...]
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 3 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on July 12, 2010
Format: Paperback
This book was a complete waste of time. I didn't learn anything about Booth that I didn't already know, when there are so many interesting facts about his life, such as his borrowing a uniform and pretending to be in the Virginia militia that captured the abolitionist John Brown at the federal armory at Harper's Ferry.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Mary P. Rayme on March 20, 2014
Format: Paperback
Honestly, this book may have wonderful content but the drawings are horrible. The strong point of most graphic novels is that the images make the information enticing, but in this case the poor quality of the artwork makes anything of substance in this book really deplorable.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Tim Lieder on December 22, 2010
Format: Paperback
This is a decent enough story with some degree of silliness in that it depicts John Wilkes Booth as a thwarted idealist who seizes upon the chance of killing Lincoln after a lot of spying and double dealing. He is in way over his head throughout the book and then he ends up dead. This says a lot about idealism and acting. Edwin Booth gets some scenes but mostly its John Wilkes making a nuisance of himself.

I would give it more stars, but I don't like the art. Everything is too clumsy and unworkable. It should read much faster than it does.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again