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Bootstrapper: From Broke to Badass on a Northern Michigan Farm Hardcover – Deckle Edge, June 11, 2013


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Knopf; 5.12.2013 edition (June 11, 2013)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0307596915
  • ISBN-13: 978-0307596918
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.4 x 1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 15.2 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (132 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #203,064 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

In a heart-wrenching, heartwarming, and invigorating memoir, author and farmer Link struggles following her divorce to hold on to the life she had built. Link is not, as her ex-husband had taunted, Rebecca of Sunnybrook Farm, but she is resilient, resourceful, and determined in her efforts to save the farm and make a living for herself and her three sons. Although they are facing distressingly difficult times, they soldier on through calamities of all sizes, often finding unorthodox solutions to such unusual problems as a broken freezer that stores all their winter meat, an overly amorous rooster, and a Christmas tree utterly lacking in the proper equipment. Link’s pride in her sons and the life they have made shines throughout the book and is obviously well deserved. Neither sugarcoated nor wallowing in self-pity, Link’s storytelling is as tough, honest, and unyielding as one would expect from a Michigan farmer. Her account, told with humor and panache, of pulling oneself up after disappointment and loss will appeal to the bootstrapper in all of us. --Bridget Thoreson

Review

Praise for Mardi Jo Link’s Bootstrapper
 
“Link’s story possesses that rare, elusive, but much sought-after feeling of authenticity . . . Glints with Link’s raw, willful energy.”
            —New York Times Book Review
 
“A heroic-comic saga of single motherhood, pure stubbornness, and the loyalty of three young sons. And more than that, an honest account of the working poor, the people who buy day-old bread, patronize libraries, rarely go to movies, and don't need your sympathy. Just a break now and then.”
            —Garrison Keillor
 
 “Hilarious, wrenching and heartwarming, Link’s poignant memoir chronicles one woman’s determination to discover meaning and wholeness in the midst of brokenness. It’s almost as if Cheryl Strayed had stayed down on the farm instead of hiking the Pacific Crest Trail.”
            —BookPage
 
"Electric, candid . . . A country song of a memoir, complete with a broken-down truck named Cookie. It's great fun to listen to once, full blast." 
            —San Francisco Chronicle

"Many memoirs about the trauma of divorce are available today, but none of them is as dynamic as Mardi Jo Link's fittingly titled Bootstrapper."
            —Minneapolis Star-Tribune

“You’ll fall in love with Mardi Jo Link’s family in this irreverent and heartwarming memoir depicting her heroic fight to hold on to her northern Michigan farm and the simple way of life she wants to preserve for her three young sons.”
            —Parade 

“A potent cocktail of ingenuity and humor . . . about a mother’s fierce love and the sustaining fabric of family . . . Direct, funny, void of self-pity, and exceedingly humane.”
            —Kirkus Reviews
 
“Tough, honest, and appealing . . . will appeal to the bootstrapper in all of us.”
            —Booklist
 
“Funny . . . honest . . . A tale of grit and determination . . . You can’t help but admire the ingenuity of this four-member team, each stepping up during one crisis or another.”
            —New York Journal of Books
 
 “Beautifully written . . . brutally honest . . . crystallizes the love, the struggles and the loneliness of a single mom.”
            —MyNorth.com
 
 “Link’s hopes, dreams, triumphs, losses, and more are laid bare. But what shone through the brightest was the love for her sons . . . I couldn’t put Bootstrapper down—I was cheering Mardi Jo on with every chapter . . . These are the memoirs I like to read—real people, real life. And she sounds like the kind of person I’d like to visit with on the porch.”
            —A Bookworm’s World
 
“Mardi Jo Link’s fierce love for her three sons oozes from every page of this ode to tenacity, honesty, authenticity, and creative survival skills . . . She’s always doggedly determined and funny—yes, unceasingly funny . . . Shed a tear or two and laugh out loud as you share the ride that is motherhood with this authentic woman who uses much more than just her boots to pull herself out of misery and insolvency into a life well lived.”
            —Hungry for Good Books?
 
“Refreshingly powerful . . . Straight from the heart . . . [Link] speaks to the power of self-reliance, while entertaining readers with her tireless defiance and sheer badassery.”
            —Biographile
 
“Irreverent yet poignant . . . humorous and heartwarming.”
            —Traverse City Record-Eagle
 
“Intriguing . . . Hilarious . . . A fascinating look at Link’s family’s ability to persevere and use assorted, often creative innovations to succeed . . . Great summer reading.”
            —Lansing State Journal
 
 “Bootstrapper does what only a really good book can do . . . Maybe it’s because of Link’s faith in the future, the kind of self-reliance that puts most of us to shame, or just the enormity of the courage it took to keep her boys’ spirits up . . . but I rooted for her all the way through the book . . . Mardi Link is the woman we all hope we’d be if ever faced with the same trials, with boys to raise, and a new life to lead.”
            —Northern Express
 
“I love the author’s voice. Funny and self-deprecating, but also heartwarming and hopeful.”
            —Baltimore Fishbowl
 
 “As a writer and mother, Mardi Jo Link is a true force of nature. This lovely, lyrical memoir of family, farm and faith is as stunningly unforgettable as a Lake Michigan sunset.”
            —Wade Rouse, author of At Least in the City Someone Would Hear Me Scream
 
“In Bootstrapper, memoirist Mardi Jo Link harvests the fruitful moments from her hardscrabble experiences as a single mother and offers up a near endless bounty of vital humor and vivacious humanity. Just you wait, Dear Reader. This book will make a home inside your heart.”
            —Jon Pineda, author of Sleep in Me

More About the Author

Mardi Link was born in Detroit and grew up in the state's southeastern suburbs, spending summers up north on Lake Michigan. The only daughter of educators, she attended Michigan State University's school of journalism, and has worked as a police and general assignment reporter, magazine editor, and freelance writer. Her first book, When Evil Came to Good Hart, was published in 2008 by the University of Michigan Press and spent four months on the Heartland Bestseller List.

Her second book, Isadore's Secret, was published in 2009 also by the University of Michigan Press, and chronicles the mysterious disappearance of a Felician nun from her convent in 1907. It was named a Michigan Notable Book, a Great Lakes Great Read, and also spent several months on the Heartland Bestseller List.

Mardi's latest work is a forthcoming memoir from Knopf. She lives with her husband and three sons on a hobby farm near Traverse City, Michigan.

Customer Reviews

This book was a page turner for me, that I nearly finished in two days.
silhouette_of_enchantment
It's an inspiring story of what a woman can do with the help of her children to make a special life for them.
Sara Jill Wellman
I liked this author's writing style and I thought the book was a balanced mix of humor and hard times.
G. Uhl

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Luanne Ollivier TOP 500 REVIEWER on June 11, 2013
Format: Hardcover
Bootstrapper: to promote or develop by initiative and effort with little or no assistance --- Merriam-Webster dictionary.

Mardi Jo Link is living the life she always dreamed of - three amazing young sons and the opportunity to raise them in the countryside in a beautiful old farmhouse sitting on six acres. And yes, there was a husband too - but with divorce now a certainty, Mardi Jo is determined to hang onto her sons, her house and her land - by herself.

"I'm claiming my sons, the farm, the debt, the other debt, the horses, the dogs, and the land. I'm claiming our century-old farmhouse, the garden, the woods, the pasture, the barn, and the Quonset-hut garage. They're all mine now, and this is how I will raise my boys: on cheerful summer days and well water and BB guns and horseback riding and dirt. Because I'm claiming our whole country life, the one I've been dreaming of and planning out and working for since I was a little girl."

And this is where the bootstrapping comes into play -for Link is working with next to nothing in the way of finances. And wants to do it on her own - "I made this bed and I'll either lie in it or die in it, but I won't ask anyone for help."

Mardi Jo details the physical ups and downs - the day to day business of providing, but Bootstrapper also reads like a personal diary with Link's hopes, dreams, triumphs, losses and more laid bare. But what shone through the brightest was the love for her sons. These are the passages that stayed with me the longest. There are struggles, but the love and support they feel for each other is tangible. And quite humorous at times.

""Boys," I announced, "we're going to raise some chickens."
"Another pet to play with!" said Will, the idealist.
Read more ›
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29 of 36 people found the following review helpful By Melanie Gilbert VINE VOICE on July 2, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Laura Wilder, author of the classic "Little House" series, was a bootstrapper. She lived a childhood of unrelenting sorrow and sacrifice, deprivations and dangers. She then married into an even more trying life as the wife of Almanzo, a struggling and unlucky farmer.

Laura Wilder was also a writer. And while her work never featured sex, drugs, rock-and-roll, drinking, cursing, bitterness or blame, she wrote about her frontier experiences with a poetic stoicism that still resonates with readers.

There's a difference between living a life dedicated to living off the land and a temporary life of "roughing it" until your fortunes improve because your modern lifestyle has run off the rails.

Author Mardi Jo Link is a lot of things - divorced, broke, clever, ridiculous, scrappy and stubborn. She may be bad as she wants to be, and she may be an ass, but she is not a badass. She is also not a bootstrapper.

Too bad, because that's the book I wanted to read. Link confuses back to basics - due to personal and professional setbacks - to being back to nature. Spoiler alert: this is not a Foxfire-style book set on a Northern Michigan farm; this is a lifestyle book dressed in flannel and ready to party.
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28 of 35 people found the following review helpful By Catherine Jo Morgan VINE VOICE on May 29, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I expected to enjoy this book a lot, based on the title, subtitle ("From Broke to Badass on a Northern Michigan Farm") and the blurb from the publisher, ("...an extraordinary account....")

I did finish it, but all the time I was reading this book, I was waiting for something that never came. I'm afraid the experience was more like listening patiently to a friend tell about all the stuff going wrong in her life -- when you're listening because, hey, that's what friends do. A lot of this book seemed sort of whomped up, hyberbole, so there was a sense of "drama queen" here. Granted, a lot did go wrong and there were plenty of challenges. The author succeeded in what she set out to do. If the whole thing were toned down a bit -- to lower the reader's expectations -- I think it would have come off better.

In this kind of memoir, I look for real humor, compassion and a deeper level of understanding -- new insights, new patterns, an expansion of awareness. I want the book to open up something new for me, change me in what feels like a good way. In other words, I want something besides what I read here.

This book isn't badly written, and no author can be expected to write as well early on, as after the first seven or eight books. So I hope this author doesn't give up. But -- I wouldn't recommend spending money to buy this one.
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30 of 39 people found the following review helpful By Just Me on May 22, 2013
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
I found the author to be immature and the book to be depressing and not enjoyable. No lessons learned, no connections made. I suspect that most readers would not identify or enjoy "spending time" with the drunk driving, 8 ball tournament winning author. Her children, 3 sons, are rude to her. She, in turn, describes them as "little traitors" for wanting to spend the weekend with their father, whom Link has recently separated from. The book contains coarse language and the corresponding attitude throughout. Link goes to one PTA meeting. When she is unable to convince them to plan a field trip to her farm so that the kids can work their, she never returns to the PTA. Sunday brunch consists of 2 donuts each for her sons and a bloody Mary for Link. Link seldom looks on the bright side, complaining about the mess and smell (!!!!) of toasting marshmallows in the fireplace. She isolates herself, not even telling her parents about the troubles she is experiencing.

A side note on the chickens. She is told to get Leghorns to raise for meat. Leghorns are quite possibly the worst chickens, besides most bantams, for meat. They are bred for the production of massive quantities of eggs. And no, they aren't great in the cold either, despite what she was told. Turns out not to matter, though, as Link can't bring herself to slaughter them and gives them away.

The book concludes with Link's marriage to a new man, who isn't discussed much in the book. No conclusion to her financial struggles, unless this man is well off enough to rescue the farm for her.

Disappointing.
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