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Bop Till You Drop


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Audio CD, October 25, 1990
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$16.99
$4.38 $2.09

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Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. Little Sister 3:52$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Go Home Girl 5:14$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  3. The Very Thing That Makes You Rich [Makes Me Poor] 5:32$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  4. I Think It's Going To Work Out Fine 4:44$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Down In Hollywood 4:19$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Look At Granny Run Run 3:12$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Trouble, You Can't Fool Me 4:57$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  8. Don't Mess Up A Good Thing 4:06$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  9. I Can't Win 4:14$1.29  Buy MP3 

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Biography

Whether serving as a session musician, solo artist, or soundtrack composer, Ry Cooder's chameleon-like fretted instrument virtuosity, songwriting, and choices of material encompass an incredibly eclectic range of North American musical styles, including rock & roll, blues, reggae, Tex-Mex, Hawaiian, Dixieland jazz, country, folk, R&B, gospel, and vaudeville. The 16-year-old Cooder ... Read more in Amazon's Ry Cooder Store

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Frequently Bought Together

Bop Till You Drop + Into the Purple Valley + Paradise & Lunch
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Product Details

  • Audio CD (October 25, 1990)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Warner Bros.
  • ASIN: B000002KKG
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (47 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #17,247 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

Medium 1
  1. Little Sister
  2. Go Home, Girl
  3. The Very Thing That Makes You Rich
  4. I Think It's Going To Work Out Fine
  5. Down In Hollywood
  6. Look At Granny Run Run
  7. Trouble, You Can't Fool Me
  8. Don't Mess Up A Good Thing
  9. I Can't Win

Amazon.com

For all the laudatory work he's done in rediscovering a panoply of artists from roots-based musical genres, Cooder's attempt to pay homage to influences closer to home, namely '50s rock and R&B, on Bop Till You Drop produced spotty results. While Arthur Alexander's "Go Home, Girl" and Cooder's own composition, "Down in Hollywood," are notable exceptions, most of the album suffers from languor stemming from a real lack of drive or direction. Cooder's failed attempt to place Elvis Presley's "Little Sister" in a broader musical context underscores the gap between intent and achievement which plagues the majority of songs on this well-meaning but unsatisfying effort. --Wayne Pernu

Customer Reviews

Bop Til you Drop!!!
great horse
I have the original LP of this great recording.
Man of La Mancha
A great effort overall.
R. Myhr

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 20 people found the following review helpful By David K. Bell on August 14, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Ry Cooder, more than anyone who has touched the pop music scene, has done a great service to music lovers by resurrecting nearly-forgotten genres of indiginous American music. From his early inspiration by Hawaiian slack-key guitar master Gabby Pahinui and the gritty, passionate Sleepy John Estes, to very early jazz forms to Tex/Mex to gospel, bluesy mandolin, Depression-era worksongs, the list is very long. But you cannot accuse him of being a dilettante, because he is extremely respectful of all the traditions he explores, remaining true to their spirits while somehow adding his own distinctive imprint. His interests have ranged abroad in more recent years to India, East Africa and, most famously, Cuba.
Bop Till You Drop explores neglected corners of the rhythm 'n' blues genre. I am a 30-year enthusiastic fan of Ry Cooder's work, and I think this is one of his best. Start with "Down in Hollywood," as tight a piece of funk as you will find. The peerless Jim Keltner anchors the rhythm section with his drum work that manages to be aggressive and tightly restrained as well. Chaka Khan's backup vocal is searing. Cooder's trademark combination of sly humor and get-down musicianship make this song a classic. The gospel-based Trouble You Can't Fool Me and I Can't Win are masterpieces of vocal harmony. I Can't Win is as poignant an unrequited love song as the best Motown ever produced. The Very Thing is once again vintage Cooder, with its effortless, flawless backbeat rhythm, stunning vocal harmonies and just-right instrumental work. The man knows how to put an album together. The cover of the old Ike and Tina Turner number Don't Mess Up a Good Thing is better than the original.
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8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Ralph Jas on March 26, 2000
Format: Audio CD
I cannot understand anyone flogging this album. It has got warmth, it has got depth, there are some very good songs and a few great ones on it, and the people involved can really sing and play their instruments... which is something too rare, nowadays.
My personal favorites are the first four tracks, with the instrumental 'I think it's gonna work out fine' as the absolute pinnacle of top notch playing without getting technical. I mean, there still is a lot of emotion and feeling going on behind the flawless playing.
This album drew my attention to Ry Cooder and I have been buying all his stuff before and after. I can strongly recommend Chicken Skin Music and his work with the Buena Vista Social Club, although both albums are quite different from this one.
As a bonus: this was one of the very first digitally recorded popular albums - if not THE first.
Enjoy. Go with the flow. You'll get back to this album once you've learned to enjoy it.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Che on November 4, 2003
Format: Audio CD Verified Purchase
i don't seem to agree with the music critics and even with ry cooder himself on this one. i read at [...], that ry disowned this recording.... which i don't understand at all. for me this is one of his standout efforts. eclectic, yes. but unpretentious and at ease with itself. r&b how it could be: funky, bluesy, with a gospel touch here and there. great playingfrom all, specially from fellow guitarist david lindley. great singing from chaka khan and bobby king. i prefer this one many times over ry's much praised efforts as "tourist guide" presenting latin roots music to a greater audience with his buena vista social club efforts. not that i don't like son: i love son, afro american music at it's best, but it does'nt need ry to discover it. and also unfortunately with his putting the spot light on some few cuban musicians - albeit great - many others, specially those not from cuba are left in the dark. with bop till you drop he does not "discover", but "plays" what he knows best.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Patrick Crain on May 11, 2000
Format: Audio CD
If there is one song on this album that is worth the price of purchase it is Look at Granny Run Run. That, for some reason, has always been one of my favorite Ry Cooder songs and I always lamented that it was on my least favorite Ry Cooder album. My lamentation is not so much a bad thing due to the fact that this, the first digitally recorded album ever, is ten times better than most artists' best work. The strange mix of tunes and styles such as the gospelization of Trouble, You Can't Fool Me and the oddball Down in Hollywood give this album a "late-night, late seventies LA, the party is over and we're all out of coke" feel. It seems that Cooder and producer Lee Herschberg threw everything they had into this album. And even though the production on this disc gives it an unnecessary sheen that sometimes drowns out Cooder's guitar and makes things a tinge tinny, Cooder's infectious playing and great selection of tunes make this one a winner.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By J. Gallant on August 22, 2008
Format: Audio CD
This disc is one of the oddest but most satisfying in my collection. Ry Cooder's mastery of slide guitar, slack-key and nearly everything stringed is the stuff of legend. But here he proves he can turn soul and early rock nuggets on their heads with his off-the-wall interpretations --and warble as well as any blue-eyed soulman, Morrison included.

Cooder transforms Elvis' "Little Sister" from cheeky rockabilly into a lovesick plea set to a soulful, steamy pop melody. "The Very Thing That Makes You Rich (Makes Me Poor)" matches done-me-wrong blues lyrics with percolating, mid-tempo funk.

"Down in Hollywood" is silly and as greasy as a KFC three-piece, and it shines courtesy of a tensile background vocal workout by Chaka Khan. "Don't Mess Up a Good Thing" again showcases Khan and echoes its original counterpart more faithfully than any of the other tunes on the album.

Steeped in Staples gospel, the disc's closer, "I Can't Win," exposes the wounds of heartbreak naked to the world. Cooder lets his stellar backing vocalists do the heavy lifting, capping a late-night, melancholy tribute to rock and soul's earthy beginnings.

The contributions of Cooder's studio friends alone make this set a treat. In addition to Khan, notable co-conspirators include vocalist Bobby King and guitarist David Lindley, who stands shoulder-to-shoulder with Cooder in the pantheon of less-appreciated string wizards.
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