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58 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 stars if you were born after 1970
It was in order to read and enjoy this book that I first read "The Hobbit" and the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy. One of my high school buddies, now a struggling author, was tossed out of English class for laughing out loud while reading this book during class. I read it in 1974, and remember laughing out loud frequently. [Unfortunately, LOTR and...
Published on September 2, 1999 by An adult reader

versus
5 of 6 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Grind Up A Sacred Cow
Nothing, but nothing, in my Humble Opinion, is beyond making fun of. People who hold JRRT or any other author or human being as "beyond criticism" need to get a life -- or therapy.
On the other hand, I think it's rather a stretch to say this is The Funniest Book Ever Written. Such hyperbole is as bad as the claims that the Lord of the Rings is The...
Published on May 2, 1998 by Prembone, Administrator of Tru...


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58 of 61 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars 4 stars if you were born after 1970, September 2, 1999
By 
This review is from: Bored of the Rings: A Parody of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (Paperback)
It was in order to read and enjoy this book that I first read "The Hobbit" and the "Lord of the Rings" trilogy. One of my high school buddies, now a struggling author, was tossed out of English class for laughing out loud while reading this book during class. I read it in 1974, and remember laughing out loud frequently. [Unfortunately, LOTR and BOTR led to the Dungeons and Dragons(tm) role playing games, which cost me points off my GPA in college. ] Here it is, 25 years later, and rereading this book made me chuckle with delight. My kids want to read whatever it was that made Daddy laugh, so I have promised them that when they have finished Tolkein's books, which are good, clean heroic fantasy based on a variety of Western Literary archetypes, that they can read this short and humorous spoof.
The book has not aged as well as it might have, since it has many pop culture references from the late 1960's/early 1970's. Back then, drugs were "cool," writing dirty passages was a daring/shocking assault on the perceived prudery of American society, the anti-establishment theme was still a vibrant part of American culture, and National Lampoon was becoming a very funny (albeit sohpomoric) magazine. Cultural norms change, and some contextual humor will be lost to the current generation. All that notwithstanding, BOTR is a great spoof of LOTR and an integral part of any Tolkein collection.
For those of you offended by a spoof of JRR Tolkein's trilogy, including the indignant 8th grader, I challenge you to write a parody of the LOTR for Generation X. You will find that it takes great love for a work to spoof it successfully. Example: Monty Python's Quest for the Holy Grail movie, a spoof of the most beloved legendary figure of English culture. I suspect there are a lot of sharp wits out there who could equal, or even better, the original spoof and in so doing make a whole new generation laugh without losing their affection for the LOTR. I for one would love to see a Generation X spoof of Lord of the Rings.
Laughter is good for you. . . so read this book.
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25 of 25 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Harvard Lampoon's take on Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings", December 16, 2004
By 
Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
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Despite a background in literature I actually remember very few lines of verse, but amongst those committed to memory are the lines: "We Boggies are a merry folk/who like to eat until we choke/loving all like friend and brother/and hardly ever eat each other" (which is followed up a chorus that repeats the word "gobble" a whole bunch of times). "Bored of the Rings," the Harvard Lampoon parody of J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings," was written by Douglas C. Kenney and Henry N. Beard at the end of the Sixties, right before they went off into the real world to found "The National Lampoon" and at a time when the Trilogy was required reading for fans of fantasy.

Of course, it goes without saying that much of what you will find in here will be grossly offensive and that if you are not well versed in Tolkien's Trilogy then the story of the ring that was given by Dildo Bugger to his nephew Frito, who then embarked with his servant Spam, his friends Moxie and Pepsi, Goodgulf Grayteeth the wizard, Stomper the ranger (a.k.a. Arrowroot of Arrowshirt), Bromosel, Gimlet the dwarf and Legolam the elf across Lower Middle Earth to the dark land of Fordor is not going to make much sense. For that matter you had better be well versed in the drug culture of the Sixties and the political machinations of Richard Nixon to get all of the references (I just realized: we need an annotated edition of "Bored of the Rings"). Even if you have seen the movies and recognize the lady Hashberry, you still need to have read the books to know who Tom Benzedrine is in the grand scheme of things.

My favorite scene are when the Ballhog shows up and when Goddam and the ring meet their final fate. This is a lengthy parody, necessitated by the size of the work that inspired this insanity. Despite the low-brown humor involved with the playful names, there is some college level sophistication to the parody as well. However, if you consider Tolkien to be sacred text, then do not go anywhere near "Bored of the Rings" because you will be grossly offended (and probably several other types of offended as well). I will still maintain that the wicked sense of humor here is inspired by an affection for Tolkien's work, but understand that there will be those who dismiss that idea.
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29 of 33 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Harvard Lampoon's take on Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings", February 4, 2004
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Amazon Customer (The Zenith City, Duluth, Minnesota) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Bored of the Rings: A Parody of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (Paperback)
I remember very few lines of verse, but amongst those committed to memory are the lines: "We Boggies are a merry folk/who like to eat until we choke/loving all like friend and brother/and hardly ever eat each other" (which is followed up a chorus that repeats the word "gobble" a whole bunch of times). "Bored of the Rings," the Harvard Lampoon parody of J.R.R. Tolkien's "Lord of the Rings," was written by Douglas C. Kenney and Henry N. Beard at the end of the Sixties, right before they went off into the real world to found "The National Lampoon" and at a time when the Trilogy was required reading for fans of fantasy.
Of course, it goes without saying that much of what you will find in here will be grossly offensive and that if you are not well versed in Tolkien's Trilogy then the story of the ring that was given by Dildo Bugger to his nephew Frito, who then embarked with his servant Spam, his friends Moxie and Pepsi, Goodgulf Grayteeth the wizard, Stomper the ranger (a.k.a. Arrowroot of Arrowshirt), Bromosel, Gimlet the dwarf and Legolam the elf across Lower Middle Earth to the dark land of Fordor is not going to make much sense. For that matter you had better be well versed in the drug culture of the Sixties and the political machinations of Richard Nixon to get all of the references (I just realized: we need an annotated edition of "Bored of the Rings"). Even if you have seen the movies and recognize the lady Hashberry, you still need to have read the books to know who Tom Benzedrine is in the grand scheme of things.
My favorite scene are when the Ballhog shows up and when Goddam and the ring meet their final fate. This is a lengthy parody, necessitated by the size of the work that inspired this insanity. Despite the low-brown humor involved with the playful names, there is some college level sophistication to the parody as well. However, if you consider Tolkien to be sacred text, then do not go anywhere near "Bored of the Rings" because you will be grossly offended (and probably several other types of offended as well). I will still maintain that the wicked sense of humor here is inspired by an affection for Tolkien's work, but understand that there will be those who dismiss that idea.
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25 of 29 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A Classic... Still hilarious after a million re-reads, August 1, 1999
By A Customer
This review is from: Bored of the Rings: A Parody of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (Paperback)
I had read the Trilogy and the Hobbit numerous times when I first came across this little book in a bookstore not long after it first came out. I lent someone my copy, and, as noted by several reviewers, it never came back.
I personally think many of the previous reviewers are totally "out to lunch" with their comments about how it is taboo to parody the immortal J.R.R. Tolkien, as if "Lord of the Rings" were the Bible or the Koran. Nuts! You need to GET... A... LIFE... I suspect you are the same type of people who actively (and in seriousness) debate whether Kirk's Enterprise would defeat Picard's Enterprise in battle. You know who you are. You probably named your daughter "Arwen." Icky. Double icky.
This book is clearly a parody despite comments to the contrary attempting to define what a parody is and isn't. In fact it is a brilliant parody and I bet old J.R.R. would have found it quite funny himself.
Beard and Kenney were pretty smart and creative in their parody, even paying homage to A.A. Milne, with Frito and his companions following their own tracks (and scraps of breaded veal cutlets) much as Pooh and Piglet followed theirs around the Hundred-Acre Wood. And each chapter has its classic moments, such as the description of the results of the attack of the Jolly Green Giant and the VeeAtes on Serutanland (Treebeard and the Ents attacking Saruman): "But the narcs still fought back desperately, their long blades flashing, dripping with vitamin-packed gore. The ramparts were littered with chopped parsely, diced onions, and grated carrots. Rivers of red tomato juice ran over the stones, and a ghastly salad floated in the moat." As Wile E. Coyote might say, "Genius. Sheer, unadulterated genius."
As you can tell, I love the book and always have. From Dildo betting against Frito arriving at Riv'n'dell and losing to Orlon, from Bromosel saying "this is indeed a queer river" as the water lapped at his thighs, from Frito's ears ringing like a dwarf's cash register to Goodgulf lifting Gimlet's watch, from Frito's Oink-Oink burger seeking repatriation with Spam's Bow-Wow burger to the amazing description of the trips the boggies took in the company of Tim Benzedrine and Hashberry, this book is wonderful. If you know and love the "Lord of the Rings" AND you have a sense of humor and don't think Tolkien was akin to God, you will love the book and you will love it every time you pick it back up.
Those of you who don't like it, don't read it. And to you I say, as that witty old conjurer, Goodgulf Grayteeth, once said, "why do not thee make a cuckoo clock or whatever you do with your spare time?" And... get... a... life.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Narcs on Pigs!, June 2, 2002
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This review is from: Bored of the Rings: A Parody of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (Paperback)
Need a little break from all the horrid seriousness of the day? Then this marvelously inventive parody should hit just the spot. From the hilarious twisted names of Dildo and Frito Bugger, Goodgulf the wizard, Gimlet the dwarf and Legolam the elf to the equally twisted representations of the Boggies in the Sty and the Riders of Roi-Tan and their merino sheep, to the exacting depiction of college life of the Forward, each page will bring a smile, a chuckle, and an outright belly-laugh.
I read Lord of the Rings when it was first published in paperback in 1965, and like many others fell totally in love with Tolkien's marvelous sense of language and incredibly detailed world building. When Bored of the Rings came out in 1969, I immediately grabbed it, as I grabbed everything else remotely dealing with Middle Earth. My shekels were well spent in this case, and I always remember some of these perverted alternative scenes whenever I re-read the original. This book follows the plot line of the original very closely, boiling down the original 1200 pages to this book's 150 and managing to cover every major scene, which is quite a feat.
Clearly though, as a parody, this book is not a stand-alone. Much of its humor derives from the reader's knowledge of the original. It also helps if you're old enough to remember some of the television commercials of the sixties, as otherwise some of the references in this book will pass over your head. There are also some pokes at certain Presidents, TV series, movies, cultural icons, and the hippie and drug-laced counter-culture of the day.
Like many good things, this book is best devoured in small bites, a few pages a day, stopping before your humor-detector collapses from over-stimulation. A great way to relax for a few minutes at the end of the day.
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19 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Nasty. Vicous. Acidulous. Disrespectful. Wicked. Priceless., February 4, 2001
By 
David Basskin (Toronto, Ontario Canada) - See all my reviews
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This review is from: Bored of the Rings: A Parody of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (Paperback)
I've read and re-read LOTR more times than I can remember. A few years back, it was my daughter's bedtime story for more than a year - she still has nightmares about the barrow wight! So don't get me wrong - LOTR will always be one of my most treasured reading experiences.
But.
"Bored of the Rings" is probably the most perfect exercise in satire I've ever read. There's gold on every page - the book is the perfect hinge between the glories of Mad Magazine at its sharpest and the brilliance of the National Lampoon generation to come. Doug Kenney died not very long after this book was published. What a loss!
Yes, as other reviewers have noted, you'll laugh harder if you're well-drilled in Tolkien's books and late-sixties commercial, product and political references. Get an oldie like me to explain 'em to you, kids. Don't miss BOTR. Hop a hill, pop a pill, for old Tim Benzedrino!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The funniest book I have ever read., September 27, 1997
By A Customer
This review is from: Bored of the Rings: A Parody of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (Paperback)
Reading J.R.R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings" was a life-changing experience for me, as it has been for millions of others. "Bored of the Rings" assaults and mocks Tolkien's classic so brilliantly and thoroughly that a more pious reader might take umbrage. But Beard and Kinney would take that umbrage right back where you stole it from, because literally every sentence of this books reveals a comic genius that regales against the classic backdrop of Lower Middle Earth.
While some of the gags show their age (Goodgulf's excuse for dropping a smoke grenade, "Rings go better with hocus-pocus", matches meter with the ancient tag line, "Things go better with Coca-cola.", for example), the excellence of this satire stands the test of time as gracefully as its target does. Many of those time-worn gags are the originals after which many humorous cliches have since been fashioned, and they're STILL FUNNY after all these years.
How much do I like this book? It is one of the very few I and my best friend have designated "buy on sight", meaning if either of us happens to spot it in a used bookstore, he will buy every available copy in stock. Period. I currently have five copies of the old Signet edition, and have loaned out, lost, had stolen (or much more rarely) given away at least five more. My friend has even more copies than I do, at any given time (he gets out more, ironically enough). Also, the "buy on sight" policy stands, but only for the cheap, used bookstore versions. I only bought one copy of the reprint (since "every copy" at Amazon.com is well beyond *my* means), to round out the collection, but if you read this book, you'll know why I always want to have a few copies handy.
This book should be bundled with "The Lord of the Rings" as the "Fourth Book of the Trilogy". A MUST for every library, and a great chaser for those still lost in the sweet, nostalgic trance of Tolkien's eternal world of wonder. Action-packed with cheesy goodness!
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Can I give it fifteen stars?, November 25, 2001
This review is from: Bored of the Rings: A Parody of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (Paperback)
This ingenious novelette was the work of Henry Beard, Doug Kenney and other editors of the Harvard Lampoon just prior to their launch of the ground-breaking National Lampoon magazine.
"Bored of the Rings" is, quite simply, the best and funniest work of satire ever written (IMHO :-). The prologue alone (entitled "Concerning Boggies", a hysterical attack on Hobbits whom the Lampoon calls Boggies) is worth the price of the book.
The attention to satiric detail is amazing and some snippets are needed to do it justice:
"It is plain the boggies are relatives of ours, standing somewhere along the evolutionary line that leads from rats to wolverines and eventually to Italians, but what our exact relationship is cannot be told. Their beginnings lie far back in the Good Old Days when the planet was populated with the kind of colorful creatures you have to drink a quart of Old Overcoat to see nowadays...
This was all in the Third, or Sheet-Metal, Age of Lower Middle Earth,...
While there was still a King at Ribroast, the Boggies remained nominally his subjects. And to the last battle at Ribroast with the Slumlord of Borax, they sent some snipers, though who they sided with is unclear."
If you have even the slightest appreciation for Tolkien, this work should reside next to your copy of the trilogy.
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23 of 28 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars Hilarious to some, sacrilege to others, January 28, 2001
This review is from: Bored of the Rings: A Parody of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (Paperback)
Personally, I think this book is hilarious, but I HIGHLY WOULD NOT RECOMMEND IT TO TOLKIEN DIE-HARDS! I read the negative reviews of it, and really, you're asking for it if you're a "purist" and read this parody. Believe me, I love "The Lord of the Rings" and I've read it God knows how many times, but I found this book irresistable. The authors brilliantly ridicule the famous series, even skewering the Shakespearean language ("dead they were and yet not so ... their eyes shone like wet mushrooms"), characters (Tom Bombadil and Goldberry=Tim Benzedrine and Hashberry the druggies), the rhymes (O skinny wraith whose fingers are hypodermic needles!), tacky clothes (Gandalf in bellbottoms, Saruman in a red leotard and Glorfindel dressed in cheesecloth) and the names (Eorache daughter of Eorlobe; Benelux son of Electrolux) There is plenty of sharp and wickedly funny wit within this book. However, about 50% of it is a lot of dirty and crude humor that's pretty gross, and sometimes it gets so wild the plot is completely incoherent. Still, I read this so much I managed to memorize the Chant of the Green Toupees and drive my family crazy by reciting it over and over again. I'd recommend this book to casual LOTR fans, people who've read and know the book because otherwise you'll think the authors wrote it in an insane asylum, but definitely not purists and die-hards. If they want to get more Tolkien, they should read the Silmarillion and all of those history of Middle-Earth books.
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7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Hysterically funny satire... but some references are dated, September 27, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Bored of the Rings: A Parody of J. R. R. Tolkien's Lord of the Rings (Paperback)
This is an extremely funny parody of _The Lord of the Rings_. The most impressive think about it is the degree to which the details (parodized, of course) correspond to details in the original. I'm not just talking about characters, names, plot events either-- even style, phrasings, and rhythm and rhyme (in the poems) are satirized here.
The book, however, does have two shortcomings. First,this was written three decades ago and a lot of the language and references are very dated. It's still quite funny to see characters saying "Groovy", of course, but it's a different kind of funny-- a nostalgic funny like Austin Powers. The dated references (including many to commercial products no longer around)are a little more difficult... older readers will get them, but younger readers may end up just scratching their heads as to what some of these 'arcane' references are. The second is that it doesn't go quite all the way and include a satire of the appendices of _Lord of the Rings_ as well. Still, these are minor complaints about an otherwise very funny book.
Finally, one word of caution. Although this is a very funny book, I think it's humor can only really be appreciated by Tolkien fans-- by folks who've actually read the originals well enough that they can follow what's being satirized. There are, however, some Tolkien fans who still won't appreciate _Bored of the Rings_. I'm talking here about those folks who view _The Lord of the Rings_ in the way that fundamentalists view the Bible. So, if the very *idea* of an irreverent parody of Tolkien's fiction strikes you as offensive, insulting, or even blasphemous (don't laugh-- such people do exist), I'd recommend giving this book a wide berth-- it's not written for you, and you won't enjoy it.
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