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75 of 80 people found the following review helpful
on December 27, 2009
I was searching for a bottle that didn't leak (all of my Avent and Breast Flow leaked terribly). These bottles are fantastic - as long as you figure out the venting trick (it's so silly that they just don't tell you this). The "venting system" has a little, rubbery insert that goes under the nipple and protrudes into the bottle. this protuberance as an air venting slit that keeps the nipple from collapsing. this slit needs to be facing towards the ceiling when you are feeding baby. I'm guessing it's because the air your baby is causing isn't forceful enough to really push the bubbles out- but if you let the bubbles RISE, as they do naturally, you will see a continuous stream of bubbles popping up inside the bottle as your baby drinks. it's really no big deal. when i make a bottle, i always make sure this little slit is situated where the words on the bottle are. if you don't place the slit anywhere particular, you can always twist the bottle while baby is drinking - you will eventually see bubbles.
my little girl is a voracious eater. she will take down an entire 9 oz bottle without coming off the nipple once- as long as that slit is where it's supposed to be. these bottles DO NO LEAK (i have three i bought at separate times). It's so ridiculous that no one tells you to twist the bottle if it's not venting. fantastic product- if you don't mind the price.
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29 of 30 people found the following review helpful
on February 18, 2007
I have tried just about every bottle on the market, hoping to find one that my breastfeeding baby would accept. Finally, I happened upon this one. I love it, and so does my son! The vent system keeps the baby from having to let go of the nipple every so often to keep it from collapsing. And no matter what, this bottle doesn't leak! Furthermore, I really like knowing that there are no chemicals leaching from the plastic into my baby's milk. And my son likes the nipple much better than the firmer Avent nipple. A great product!
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50 of 67 people found the following review helpful
I wanted bpa (bisphenol a) free bottles for my daughter born last October, and at the time, Born Free (BF) were all I found. Fortunately, there are now more options: [...] But back to BF.

Pros:
--Bpa free plastic, plus a glass option.
--Silicone nipples are "modern". By this I mean they have a wide base at the bottom of the long nipple (like Avent). As opposed to the Evenflo glass bottles, which still have what I call the "1950's" nipple that our parents used (i.e., short stubby nipple without a "base" of any kind to mimic the breast, by contrast).

Cons:
--The anti-gas "vent": I find this totally worthless. I tried Avent, Adiri, First Years, and Evenflo, to name a few. However by the time I was set to try Dr. Browns, I decided that bpa free trumped everything else, so I went with Born Free and bought a full contingent of these bottles. The Born Free system works no better than Avent (whose bottles don't have a "system" (meaning there are no special inserts or vents)), and less well than the First Years Breastflow bottle (I loved this bottle - very little gas. Wish they had safe plastic!). I don't mind cleaning extra parts if that's what it takes to get bpa free and anti-gas, but boy, you better not make me clean an extra part that provides no material benefit. BTW, the instructions say to make sure the vent is "open." Folks, the vent consists of a vertical slit in what I'll call the "mini-nipple" of the interior silicone vent. If anyone knows how to "open" a slit, I'd be real interested to hear it.

--Cleaning brushes: while one does not need to purchase the BF bottle brush (Munchkin's is more than adequate - better even - at $3 or so), I've found the nipple brush is very useful. Munchkin's bottle/nipple brush consists of stiff bristles. While this is fine for silicone nipples, BF's specialized vent has the aforementioned "mini-nipple" which is very delicate. I've always been afraid that even gentle brushing with the bristle brush would tear the slit (the silicone is very thin here). Thus, if one wants BF's soft foam nipple brush (which does indeed work well), one will pony up $14.99 list for not only the nipple brush, but also the bottle brush. They are not sold separately. They are made of cheap foam with plastic handles - that's IT! - and they wear out quickly. Outrageous to all intelligent parents out there. The cost of producing these has to be infinitesimal. Why gouge the consumer for brushes to clean BF's bottles? Insulting and greedy, and counterproductive to generating brand loyalty.

--Price: more on the subject of greed. While I am eternally grateful to the man who brought these to market (thus putting pressure on other mfgrs to compete), I am grossly offended by Born Free's pricing structure. Let's consider the fact that the only competitive advantage these initially had (as there are now competitive alternatives; again, see link above) was 1) bpa free plastics and 2) a glass bottle with a modern, wide-base nipple. Passing on to the consumer the cost of creating a bpa free bottle is one thing, but when one considers that the other components are no different from other manufacturers (glass is glass - cheap! - and silicone nipples are a dime a dozen), the price structure is insulting to parents' intelligence. For example, on the Born Free website (all my comments are based on list price - you can often get them cheaper on Amazon, for example, but it is the manufacturer's suggested retail that I'm analyzing here), a two pack of 9 oz plastic bottles is the same price as a two pack of glass 9 oz bottles - $19.99. Glass bottles and silicone nipples (with a worthless vent, don't forget). Contrast this with Evenflo's 8 oz glass bottle three pack for $4.99. These come with rubber nipples, so add back in 3 replacement Evenflo silicone nipples at $3.50 (highest Amazon price I saw, for four nipples) and you are at $8.49: less than half the price for one more bottle and two extra nipples. Why, I ask myself? Because of the vent? The wide neck? Neither is the company's top-marketing point, rather, the bpa-free plastic is. In fact, the BF glass bottles should cost LESS than the corresponding BF bpa-free plastic bottles. It just makes sense. And as other reviewers have noted, the replacement silicone nipples (all bottles come with stage 1 nipples; eventually, you need stage 2, 3...) are more expensive than the corresponding silicone nipples of comparable brands. Here again, there is NO COMPETITIVE DIFFERENCE in these silicone nipples. The fact that they are slightly different in diameter from, say, Avent only makes one think you need to buy BF (having now read other reviewers, I'll try Dr. Browns when we get to stage 3). List price for two BF nipples (regardless of flow) is $6.99. A four pack is $12.99. Woo hoo. OUTRAGEOUS! And the $15 bottle brushes? As per above - puh-lease.
--Lack of replacement glass bottle bases - let's face it, these break. It would be REALLY NICE to be able to purchase just the glass base, without the vent, nipple and cap, for a discounted price, as a service to their customers.

The bottom line: there are other options now from MAM (the UltiVent) and Nuby by Luv n' Care. I also see that Dr. Browns now offers glass. In the breast pumping arena, all Medela's parts and containers (which convert to bottles with, unfortunately, 1950's nipples) are also bpa free. Thus, when we need more 9 oz bottles, I won't be buying BF again on principle, which is too bad, as they pioneered the bpa offering (or at least the marketing thereof), and normally that would be enough to buy my loyalty.
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13 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on April 11, 2007
These are nice bottles, easy for baby to hold and he doesn't have to interrupt feeding as much, compared with the Avent bottles.

The fact that they're free of Bisphenol-A was the killer feature for me.

My son didn't like the nipples as much so we just use the Avent ones that he is used to.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon August 26, 2007
We have used these bottles since our daughter was born due to the fact that they don't contain Bisphenol-A (BPA). They are fantastic bottles.

Here's a tip. You can use the Dr. Brown nipples with them as they are the same... and much cheaper (good for when you need to move to stage 2 and 3).
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on August 16, 2007
We originally tried glass bottles with our daughter but she couldn't handle the nipples. We've been using these for the past month and a half and they are working out great. No problems with gas or latching and just love that they're bisphenol-A free.

There have been a few nipple-collapsing incidents. Have found that if I loosen the nipple ring ever so slightly, it allows more air into the vent system and the problem is solved.

The only down side to these is that there are so many parts (nipple, nipple ring, 2 for the vent system, and the bottle). Lots to clean and one-handed assembly is almost impossible.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful
on December 11, 2007
I did not have any leaking problems with these bottles as long as I used the valves and nippleas they provide. The problems started when I wanted to replace valves and I can't buy them and I do not get any reply to the messages I send to their customer service. I started to use Avent nipples with the bottles and it is leaking while I shake the bottle to mix the formula. While the baby is feeding, there is very little leak.
Born Free would have a great product if theie customers service would be more helpful and if they would use Avent type nipples. I don't understand why they won't sell parts.
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33 of 45 people found the following review helpful
on October 10, 2007
We threw away all of our Dr. Brown bottles because of the BPA problem announced on the Baby Bargains website and swtiched to these at their suggestion.

These bottles are a big step down from Dr. Browns in every way except for the BPA-free feature. There are more air bubbles, they are wider than the standard size Dr. Brown bottles which makes it difficult for my baby to hold them, they are harder to clean, and for us the biggest problem has been that the nipples collapse all the time. This is frustrating because nipple-collapse avoidance is mentioned in most of their on-line product descriptions!

My son hates these bottles. He's developed a gas problem he never used to have and cries during feedings when the nipple collapses. I'm about to invest yet again in a new set of BPA-free bottles. Wish me luck.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on December 29, 2010
I've been using a few types of bottles for my kid such as Dr. Brown, Avent and Born Free. I have to say that BornFree bottle is so far the best.

We also experienced the problem with the nipples being collapsed. It was really frustrated for both parents and baby. I had to take the whole venting system out and clean then carefully put back then it worked. Sometime it didn't. My wife complained about this and I thought about replacing them with different brand.

However, my mother in law never had the nipple collapsing problem. We observed her way when putting the bottle and venting system together. First, after she mixed the formula, she then puts the rubber piece into the plastic piece of the venting system. She then places them on top of the bottle. Here is the most critical part: Instead of pressing these pieces into the bottle (like I did), she bangs it a few times (light bang). Then she closes it with the nipple and cap. It just works fine all the time. Since then we have never seen the nipple collapse again. Now I realize that the slit for venting in the venting rubber sometimes gets stuck which means when baby sucks the nipple, it build up vacuum inside the bottle. The vacuum force become strong enough to make the nipple collape but not strong enough to force the slit to open to let air from outside in and to fill up the vacuum. By banging the top of the bottle with the venting system in place, it kind of creates pressure or vibration strong enough to open up the slit. I did prove this theory myself and the bottle works perfectly every time. What I do is before inseart the venting system into the bottle, squeeze the rubber part having slit or touching it with something to make sure the slit is not stuck.

Now I'm expect another baby in a few months, all the bottles (nipples, venting system) are ready to be reused. None of the parts get worn out yet. The bottles are still shiny after washing.

This is one of my best investment on my babies.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
on November 6, 2010
My baby was exclusively breastfed for the first 4 months. After that, I was back at work and so a bottle was necessary. We tried a lot of different bottles: Medela (didn't vent quickly enough), Sassy Mam (leaked), Playtex Ventaire (didn't vent quickly enough), Avent (leaked). The Born Free system best for us, he went back and forth easily from the boob to the bottle without issue. No issues with excessive gas and he never collapsed a nipple (which shows the venting system works well and quick enough with the pace of his sucking).

Nice to see the price is really dropping from a year ago when they were outrageously priced.

This bottle has a great venting system. You have to remember not to screw the collar on too tight, or else it won't vent properly.

My biggest gripe is that there are a zillion parts to wash and assemble (this is why it gets only 4 stars). There are five: bottle, 2 part venting system, collar and nipple. And if you count the cap and the sealing disc, you are potentially up to 7 parts. Although, at the end of the day, I'd be willing to wash 20 parts if it meant it would minimize gas for Baby (A baby with excess gas is fun for no one). Luckily, the Munchkin Deluxe Dishwasher Basket Colors May Vary came in VERY handy. Invest in the basket if you buy these bottles. It's a small price to pay for your sanity.

I bought both the glass and plastic versions. I prefer the glass at home which is most of the time. It heats up much quicker, the ounce markings don't wear off and keeps the milk warmer longer. Also, you never know what is going to be the "next BPA" scare in plastic. With good old fashioned glass, you don't have to worry about any weird chemicals leaching out. Ever. I've never broken a glass bottle.

Plastic is good for travel for the obvious reasons that it's light and shatter resistant. And if your kid is in daycare, a lot of them won't take glass, so you're stuck. After a year, the ounce markings are starting to fade and come off a little, but still visible.

I recommend getting twice the number of bottles your baby takes in single day. This quantity worked well for my family, since we run the dishwasher about every other day.

Overall a very good bottle system.
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