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Born Together - Reared Apart: The Landmark Minnesota Twin Study Hardcover – May 14, 2012


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Born Together - Reared Apart: The Landmark Minnesota Twin Study + Someone Else's Twin: The True Story of Babies Switched at Birth + Indivisible by Two: Lives of  Extraordinary Twins
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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Harvard University Press (May 14, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9780674055469
  • ISBN-13: 978-0674055469
  • ASIN: 0674055462
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.2 x 1.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.8 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (15 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,132,633 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Nancy L. Segal is Distinguished Professor in Humanities and Social Sciences and Director of the Twin Studies Center at California State University, Fullerton.

More About the Author

Nancy L. Segal, Ph.D. (CA), is a professor in the Department of Psychology at California State University, Fullerton, and the director of the Twin Studies Center, which she founded in 1991. She is the author of Indivisible by Two: Lives of Extraordinary Twins and Entwined Lives: Twins and What They Tell Us about Human Behavior, and the senior editor of Uniting Psychology and Biology: Integrative Perspectives on Human Development. She is also an associate editor of Twin Research and Human Genetics, the official journal of the International Society for Twin Studies. Dr. Segal's media appearances include Today, Good Morning America, 20/20, the Oprah Winfrey Show, the Martha Stewart Show, Discovery Health, and the Diane Rehm Show on NPR.

Author photo by Michael Keel

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

18 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on June 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover
Identical twins share virtually all of their genes while fraternal twins share half. Comparing data from both types of twins is important in addressing the question of the relative importance of 'nature vs. nurture.' Segal's research on identical twins supports researchers who have concluded the genetics are the prime determinant of individual behavior and skills, and the environment plays a lesser role. Such conclusions date back to before 1970s Arthur Jensen at the Univ. of Calif., Berkeley, who summarized research from both identical and fraternal twins in his 'Genetics and Education.' His data also included studies of twins raised apart.

Segal's book is much less comprehensive than Jensen's work, focusing on a single set of identical twins separated after one month and then raised in different families and didn't meet until they were both aged 39. The similarities in their interests and skills were remarkable, starting with height, and also including favorite interests and vacation spots. Her book also summarizes the Minnesota Study of Twins Reared Apart project.

The importance of this finding, as well as others in the Minnesota study of 137 pairs is that education (part of environment) has limited effect on ultimate pupil achievement, and helps explain why tripling inflation-adjusted per-pupil spending over the last decades has achieved very little in terms of improved pupil performance.
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19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Gary Peterson TOP 500 REVIEWER on June 21, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I've always found twins to be fascinating. Doesn't everybody? And when I say twins, I mean identical twins. I was watching a couple at the playground where I take my son (3 1/2 years old) the other day. They were dressed identically in every way, and they behaved in a very similar fashion. Really fascinating! Identical twins can be fascinating in a wide variety of other ways. For example, there are a very limited number of twins who have been separated at or shortly after birth and raised by different parents and under different environmental circumstances. Such separated twins can turn out to be remarkably similar in their adult lives, even though their post-birth circumstances may be remarkably different. Now, that's really fascinating and it says a lot about what traits might be genetic in origin and what are environmental. Nature vs. nurture, so to speak. Studying separated twins has been a long-term project at the University of Minnesota and Nancy Segal presents some results a in "Born Together - Reared Apart." Get ready for a lot of acronyms and difficult reading. Sorry, but I've grown to hate acronyms. They're such a cliche in academic writing and I've been in a university for the past five decades.

Somewhat strangely, my main interest is not in the twins themselves. I'm the father (first child) of a 3 1/2-year-old boy, and that's fascinating in itself. I'm interested in what human characteristics are genetically inherited and what aren't. The study of separated twins can be very revealing, and can go against the grain of popular opinion in many different ways. For example, I'd like my boy to be tall (6 feet or so runs in my family). Now, is there anything I can do in his raising that would aid in reaching that stature?
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Joseph A. Schrock on March 25, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This book was definitely worth my while to read -- jam-packed with important data on the relative importance of genes versus nurture. However, it might seem a bit strange, but I was inclined to agree with both those who gave the book 5 stars and those who largely trashed it with 1 star. The reason I say this is because the book was just loaded with very important data on identical twins that help to answer numerous questions about how much of human psychological, intellectual, and physical traits are genetically determined, versus how much are simply matters of environment, nurture,and opportunity. Therefore, from that angle, the book should get 5 stars; however, for many readers (myself included), the book was just too dry, had too many technical data, too many comparisons of MISTRA studies with other scientific studies, and was not very engagingly written. From that angle, the book would hardly get more than 1 star.

I take a positive view on the book, though, and I chose to give it 4 stars, simply because the importance and scientific value of the research involved in the MISTRA were so great that they overshadowed the fact that the book was too technical, detailed, and tedious for most non-scientists.

I believe that the author was writing the book in large part for the scientific community, with much detailed discussion surrounding efforts to vindicate the validity and authenticity of the research and conclusions of the MISTRA. As for myself, being a reader with much interest in technical science, but also much appreciation for good literature, this book could not have been written so as to please both aspects of my tastes -- the aesthetic versus the technical.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Nebushwacker on September 11, 2012
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Anyone interested in the old "nature versus nurture" argument should read this book. Most people have been exposed to cribs and drabs of this research, but this is the whole enchilada....albeit a little heavy on statistics for some readers......but it has to be that way!

John Person
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