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Bound for Santa Fe: The Road to New Mexico and the American Conquest, 1806-1848 Hardcover – May 15, 2002


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 528 pages
  • Publisher: University of Oklahoma Press; First Edition edition (May 15, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0806133899
  • ISBN-13: 978-0806133898
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 1.2 x 9.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.9 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,292,977 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Stephen G. Hyslop is an independent scholar who has written extensively on American history and the Spanish-American frontier. He served as editor of a 23-volume series on American Indians for Time-Life Books and is coauthor of several books published by the National Geographic Society.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

14 of 15 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on May 14, 2002
Format: Hardcover
This authoritative volume from Stephen Hyslop sheds new light on an important aspect of the American story. Well-written and full of interesting facts, analysis, and captivating stories, this book is no dry history, but a thorough work that should have great appeal beyond the academic market. It is a book all American history buffs should enjoy. I know I did.
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8 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Roger D. Launius VINE VOICE on May 26, 2003
Format: Hardcover
Once in a while a book attains benchmark status in the historiography of a particular subject. "Bound for Santa Fe," by Stephen G. Hyslop, might well do so. It has many of the necessary ingredients. Its palate is sweeping, and the author's handling of the story both complex and captivating. More than any other recent work of history on the Santa Fe trail and trade, it captures the essence of the story and relates it to an audience removed from it by some 175 years. Most of all, "Bound for Santa Fe" is an exceptionally well-written work of history, tantalizing in its depictions and seductive in the power of its narrative.
Beginning with the earliest exploring parties from the United States into the Southwest, Hyslop takes the reader through the origins and development of the Santa Fe trade, using narratives from the trail as the centerpiece of a journey from Missouri to New Mexico. Along the trail readers meet the native peoples who had made the region their homes for centuries, the Santa Fe culture and its sometimes uneasy coexistence with Anglos from Missouri, and the unique world these various cultures made through their interactions.
At the same time, the interactions proved surprising to both sides. As only one example, Missourians expressed dismay at the mores of the New Mexicans, and that cultural divide never seemed to end despite years of close contact. When trader John Scolly hauled his Latina wife, Juana Lopes, before a Mexican judge for adultery the outcome was remarkably different to what Scolly had expected. Lopes did not deny the charges, instead offering the belligerent explanation, as reported in the court record, that "it was her ass, she controlled it, and she would give it to whomever she wanted" (p. 266).
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By John O. Meekins on September 13, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've read many, many books on the Santa Fe Trail, but this one puts so much of what transpired to get so many people going down this famous trail in sharp focus. And, it is with that focus that you really get an understanding of all that happened and why.
It is a book that I truly appreciate.
Well done, and it is a book you need if you have an interest in this subject, this era.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Michael E. Fitzgerald on December 21, 2007
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I had very high hopes for this book: The Santa Fe Trail through the eyes of those who were there. Many have used this venue and all of them have always improved the history, imparting a new understanding of events through the eyes of the participants.

Its not that there isn't some good history here, it's that Hyslop applies this technique in a haphazard fashion. We view the trek through the eyes of the same 5-6 participants who traveled the trail at decidedly different points in time. The result is that rather than moving along the trail chronologically, as the participants being quoted did, we visit each point on the trail 5-6 times completely out of chronological sequence.

The result is a hodge-podge of interpretations hopelessly out of sequence. In the end I felt sorry for the author; he obviously spent an immense amount of time in his effort and his work is historically accurate. But it is confusing; it misleads and changes or at least misstates the history that occurred as it unfolded. Taken out of sequence, the story is muted, watered down. And that is a shame because significant effort went into this work.
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