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  • Boy Meets Girl
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Boy Meets Girl


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Product Details

  • Actors: Denis Lavant, Mireille Perrier, Carroll Brooks, Maïté Nahyr, Elie Poicard
  • Directors: Leos Carax
  • Writers: Leos Carax
  • Producers: Alain Dahan, Patricia Moraz
  • Format: Black & White, Color, Full Screen, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: French (Unknown)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.33:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: NR (Not Rated)
  • Studio: Fox Lorber
  • DVD Release Date: April 10, 2001
  • Run Time: 100 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000059XTO
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #422,534 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Boy Meets Girl" on IMDb

Special Features

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Editorial Reviews

Leos Carax's (Pola X, Lovers on the Bridge) brilliant feature debut follows the relationship of an aspiring filmmaker (Denis Lavant), who has just been left by his lover and a suicidal young woman (Mireille Perrier), who is also reeling from a failed romance.

Customer Reviews

3.4 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By R. Max Totten on September 9, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
I have finally found a film to view alongside David Lynch's Eraserhead! This film shot in Black and White has the same grotesque abnormalities of Eraserhead, as well as the deadpan humor. The characters are shape much the same way, lonely but lovable in that they deal with life's uncertainties and love that has failed or been lost.
Bountiful with all the Lynchian eccentricities that, either you'll find yourself understanding them or you just won't! The film, is playful in much the same way as early French New Wave but thought provoking and with a sense of muted charisma. This film will definitely take more that a one-time viewing to really get any thing out of it due to emotions flying high and low throughout. The shots of Paris at night are truly remarkable in that the warmth of the wet streets can almost be touched ,walked, and perhaps even a slight aroma can be imagined. The "you are there" surroundings seem like a heated dream you are about ready to wake up from. A surreal moment in modern french cinema or rather a filmed performance piece with textures abound. Watch with the intent of being a fly on the wall and you may experience certain particles of your life appear before your very eyes. ...
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2 of 3 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 18, 2002
Format: DVD
This bizarre, graphic and ultimately very moving journey through love's little foibles is brilliantly realized by auteur LEOS CARAX. In some ways a 'throwback' to the glorious days of Alain Resnais - superbly photographed and deliberately paced to draw the viewer [voyeur?] into the lives of our loving couple. Carax later works disappoint slightly, but let's face it he never is quite as boring as the other 'would be's"!
If you yearn for a good moody art movie - get this one!
Then explore the beginnings of this movement!
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Format: DVD
Leos Carax and Jim Jarmusch's First Films: While watching Leos Carax' first feature film BOY MEETS GIRL (1984), I couldn't help thinking of Jim Jarmusch's first feature PERMANENT VACATION (1980). Both films are about loners who wander the streets of their respective cities (Paris, New York) in search of love/art/identity/truth/their own voice-vision (everything young artists search for). Both films evoke the otherworldly Lautremont as the ultimate symbol of the artisitic loner on a journey to his own private nowhere. Both films are steeped in nostalgia for other time periods/cultural styles. The Carax film is primarily memorable for a very long party scene which is itself reminiscent of other such scenes in films from the 1960's (La Dolca Vita, La Notte) and this scene no doubt inspired many critics to link Carax to the New Wave, but within that party scene Carax includes an homage to the power of silent films and the peculiar power of silent film performance which is something the New Wave directors were intrigued by but never explored quite as thoroughly as Carax does here. I think what intrigues Carax about silent films is the way the silent film actors feel trapped in their own silent worlds and can only gesture toward other actors in a desperate (and futile) attempt to assuage that silence/solitude. In Boy Meets Girl the actors are each encased in an impenetrable cone of solitude/silence and there is no escape from this solitude/solipsism. As the film progresses it becomes increasingly theatrical, the actors become more desperate, and Carax' visual language/decor more and more grimly deterministic. Because of this film and its dark post-punk ennui/solipsism combined with a desperate and insatiable romantic yearning, Carax became a huge cult figure in French cinema.Read more ›
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3 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Angry Mofo on January 13, 2006
Format: DVD
I admire Leos Carax. How could one not admire a man so fixated on his grandiose ideas that he once bankrupted three producers and built a life-size replica of part of central Paris? At the same time, I confess that I don't so much like Boy Meets Girl, his first film. It leaves me with a feeling of dissatisfaction.

The protagonist, who looks exactly like Nick Cave, is an unemployed young man of ambiguous origins. He lives by himself in a small room somewhere in one of the shadier parts of Paris. When he gets tired of hearing the bickering of the couple next door, he skulks about the streets with his portable cassette player and glowers darkly. By chance, he comes across a depressed young woman named Mireille, and follows her to a party somewhere. He makes her acquaintance, they talk about their woes, and then he gets her to bring him home with her. Finally, disaster strikes and their romance is tragically cut short.

Mireille is also disturbed. She lives with a man who hates her and whom she despises. This situation is painful to her, and has presumably gone on for a long time. However, she shows no desire to change it, and continues to live in idleness, although her boyfriend is not so rich or successful as to be able to provide her with a luxurious existence. She is not married to him, and they have no children. It appears that she has never loved him at any point in time.

The film presents these facts without explaining or analyzing them. So, we learn that the protagonist wants to be a film-maker, although he has never actually made a film, and he does not really want to go through the process of making one. Similarly, we are told that Mireille wanted to be a model, but failed for some reason.
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