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Boy Meets Girl Paperback – January 6, 2004


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 400 pages
  • Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; 1 edition (January 6, 2004)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0060085452
  • ISBN-13: 978-0060085452
  • Product Dimensions: 8 x 5.4 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 10.4 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (100 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #464,516 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

This latest adult novel by the prolific Cabot (she's responsible for the ever-popular Princess Diaries franchise) unfolds, like 2002's The Boy Next Door, entirely through e-mails, journals, instant messages, phone mail, deposition transcripts, notes scribbled on menus, to-do lists and other hallmarks of a modern girl's life. Kate Mackenzie, an idealistic HR representative at the New York Journal, has just been forced by her evil boss, Amy Jenkins, to fire Ida Lopez, the wildly popular dessert cart lady at the company cafeteria. Ida bakes delectable goodies, but she won't serve them to priggish Stuart Hertzog, the paper's legal counsel, who happens to be engaged to Amy, known as the T.O.D. (tyrannical office despot) to Kate and her best friend and co-worker Jen. Sweet Ida sues for wrongful termination, and Stuart charges his younger brother, Mitch, with handling this delicate matter. But Mitch actually cares about justice more than his brother's bitchy fiancee (he's only working at the family firm at his sick father's request), and he quickly confounds Kate's expectations with his Rocky and Bullwinkle tie and "tie-him-to-the-bed" good looks. When the T.O.D. tries to lay the blame for her HR blunder on Kate, Mitch goes to the furthest reaches of lawyerly chivalry to save his ladylove. Studded with humorous details poking fun at social climbers and corporate drones, this book is less a novel than a collection of lighthearted barbs, gleeful cliches and panicky (but comic and brief) freakouts. Cabot's 20-something fans will likely devour this fluffy, fun urban fairy tale.
Copyright © Reed Business Information, a division of Reed Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

From Booklist

Kate, an earnest young human resources representative at the New York Journal, must handle a dreadful case. Her evil boss, Amy, is forcing her to fire the beloved Ida Lopez, whose desserts are famous in the senior staff room, just because Ida refused a second dessert to the detestable Stuart Hertzog, Amy's beau and the paper's lawyer. When Ida Lopez sues the paper for wrongful termination, the case goes to Mitchell, Stuart's handsome, unconventional brother. Kate is charmed by Mitch, despite the fact that she is sure he is just like his brother. He is certainly nothing like her ex-boyfriend, Dale, who is still trying to get her back though he still doesn't want to get married. Despite the forces standing in their way, Mitch and Kate are falling for each other until Mitch tries to catch Amy in a lie during a deposition, which has disastrous consequences for Kate. Told in a series of e-mails, phone messages, instant messages, and journal entries, Cabot's novel is delightfully fun to read. Kristine Huntley
Copyright © American Library Association. All rights reserved

More About the Author

I write! Books for you, your sister, your best friend, your mother . . . . even for men with good taste!

Most of my time is spent over at my website, http://megcabot.com, so be sure to stop by!

UK, New Zealand, and Australia fans, visit http://www.megcabot.co.uk.

Customer Reviews

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

28 of 30 people found the following review helpful By Riley Merrick on January 21, 2004
Format: Paperback
BOY MEETS GIRL is the follow-up to the wildly popular THE BOY NEXT DOOR. In BOY MEETS GIRL, Meg Cabot introduces us to Kate Mackenzie and Mitchell Hertzog via emails, voicemails, diary entries, and various other pieces of modern communication. Newly single and crashing on her best friend's sofa while she apartment-hunts, Kate is an employee in the Human Resources department of the New York Journal, bossed around and undermined by the Tyrannical Office Despot at every corner. When the T.O.D. orders her to fire Ida Lopez, a very popular cafeteria employee, Ida turns around and sues for breach of contract. The attorney on the case is Mitchell Hertzog, and something about Kate clicks with him, despite the fact that every time they meet, his dry cleaner makes money from the disasters that occur - oh, and the fact that his crusading on the Lopez case, intended to impress Kate and show her that he's not a soulless corporate drone, actually gets Kate fired.
Complicating matters for Mitch is the fact that his brother Stuart is engaged to the T.O.D., his younger sister is in a crisis, his older sister wants him to get married, his mother nags him at every turn, and his father, the firm's senior partner, is incommunicado on a never-ending golfing holiday. As for Kate, besides being homeless and jobless, she's covering up for the office vamp's affair with a German ski instructor and being pestered by her ex, first to move back in, then to provide a "recommendation" for him as a boyfriend to a ditzy supermodel whose idea of foreign food is the Olive Garden.
It never ceases to amaze me how well a story can be told in this format. I loved THE BOY NEXT DOOR for its novelty, and BOY MEETS GIRL delivers more of the same.
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10 of 10 people found the following review helpful By Erika Sorocco on January 7, 2004
Format: Paperback
Kate Mackenzie never thought her life would fall apart so quickly. She's working for Amy Jenkins, the Tyrannical Office Despot (T.O.D.), who just happens to be the Director of the New York Journal's Division of Human Resources, and she's sleeping on the couch in her best friend's apartment, as she makes nowhere near enough to afford decent housing in New York City. But things get even worse when the T.O.D. forces Kate to fire Ida Lopez, the dessert cart lady for the New York Journal, for refusing people pie, and, in turn, Ida sues them, saying it was a breach of contract. Now Kate is slowly losing her mind. Her ex-boyfriend is stalking her, she's living with crazy Dolly Vargas (from THE BOY NEXT DOOR), and she's falling for the lawyer, Mitchell Hertzog, handling the Ida Lopez case for the New York Journal, even though she hates corporate lawyers, and hates Mitch's brother, Stuart, even more, for causing this entire mess.
Cabot has done it again. I was doubtful that BOY MEETS GIRL would be able to compare to THE BOY NEXT DOOR, but I was wrong. BOY MEETS GIRL is just as good, if not better than it's prequel. The commentary is snappy and exciting, and the characters are funnier than ever. While the main characters are different than those featured in THE BOY NEXT DOOR, Mel Fuller (the main character in the prequel) is mentioned numerous times, and you are able to see what's happened in her life since the last book. Overall this was a fantastic book. I hope Cabot decides to write a third addition to this series, as I'd like to follow the character's lives even more. All fans of Cabot will be deeply impressed with this new work of literature, and be left craving more. A must-have.
Erika Sorocco
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Amy on March 3, 2006
Format: Paperback
I enjoyed this book a lot, and it was very funny and sincere and a lot of what everyone has said. I'm glad I read it.

That being said - was anyone else bothered by the format? I did not realize there was no dialogue before I read it, and that it's only emails, voice mails, etc. I think it's a cute way of writing, and memorable, but I found it hard to get into the romance between Katie and Mitch since it was always told after the fact. I couldn't be happy for them since I never really saw any interaction between them.

I have read other Meg Cabot books and they are not written this way, thankfully. She is a good writer and I really enjoyed "Size 12 Is Not Fat."

To anyone picking up "Boy Meets Girl," it's a good book but beware of the format.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Kiersten Harvey on March 14, 2004
Format: Paperback
I love books like this one. These are the books that make you sad when you are done reading it because you don't want it to end; you want to know what happens after that. Meg Cabot is by far my favorite author and I enjoy all of her books. This book is my favorite so far. I loved the characters and how everything tied in. The format of it was perfect. Her books make you fall in love with reading.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By PadreRat on January 13, 2004
Format: Paperback
Meg Cabot does it again in BOY MEETS GIRL. The story follows the same format as THE BOY NEXT DOOR. It is told through the technology age: emails, court depositions, telephone recordings, notes on a dinner menu, etc. There are a lot of characters from THE BOY NEXT DOOR who reappear and are still working at the New York Journal.
Our story here starts with the law firm where Mitch has joined at this father's request after a near fatal heart attack. Mitch is given the task of defending the Journal's new HR assistant, Kate Mackenzie, when she and the company are sued for wrongful termination of Ida, the beloved dessert cart operator. Ida refuses to serve her delectable treats to certain members of the management staff. This time, it's Stuart Hertzog, the Journal's legal counsel and fiancé to Kate's boss, Amy Jenkins the "T.O.D." (Tyrannical Office Despot). Stuart has a conflict of interest so he passes this case along to Mitch, even though he doesn't get along with him.
Kate is attracted to Mitch, as he is with her, but every time she is near him, something embarrassing happens to her. Her ex-boyfriend is the only man she has been with and since he won't commit after ten years together, Kate leaves him and camps out on her Jen's couch. Through a series of events, Kate finds herself living with the Journal's style editor, Dolly Vargas. (Yes, she makes an appearance after her stint in THE BOY NEXT DOOR.) Amy tries to pin the termination issues on Kate and Mitch works hard to prove Kate's innocence.
The best parts of Meg Cabot's books are the insights into the corporate world. Every business has those social climbers who will stop at nothing to make themselves look good. Then you have the popular employees who seem to get the knife in the back.
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