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  • Brahms - Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor Op. 15 - Peter Serkin, Robert Shaw with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra
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Brahms - Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor Op. 15 - Peter Serkin, Robert Shaw with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra


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Audio CD, February 15, 2000
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Product Details

  • Performer: Peter Serkin
  • Orchestra: Atlanta Symphony
  • Conductor: Robert Shaw
  • Composer: Johannes Brahms
  • Audio CD (February 15, 2000)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Pro Arte
  • ASIN: B00004I9RT
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #438,319 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

1. Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 15: Maestoso
2. Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 15: Adagio
3. Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor, Op. 15: Rondo

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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By David on March 13, 2011
I won't claim to have heard all the recordings of Brahms' Piano Concerto No. 1, but I've heard more than a few. This is the best, in my opinion. Part of it is Peter Serkin's own interpretation and playing, of course. Some credit must go to Robert Shaw, who (I believe) is underrated as an orchestra conductor. And this recording will show you that the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, at least at the time of this recording (mid-1980s), was also not as appreciated as it should have been. Curiously, I find this recording far more moving and beautiful than one with an arguably more celebrated pianist (Peter Serkin's own father, Rudolf!) and orchestra (Cleveland!) and conductor (Szell!). I think part of the difference in quality lies in the actual recording. I know little about HOW such pieces are recorded (microphone set-up, studio acoustics, etc.), but you will HEAR much more of the concerto (both piano and orchestra) in this (the Shaw/Atlanta/Serkin) recording. When I first heard Brahms' First, I thought it an odd piece, but I grew to love it. The first movement is a wonder.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Dabí Sánchez on May 22, 2013
I think the secret lies in a "holistic" approach to the concerto -- to use a term from the New Age. The form of the romantic concerto implies a division, at times a contest, between soloist and orchestra. This is certainly true of Brahms's own violin concerto and of his bigger (if not longer) piano concerto. Each party challenges the other, as rhetoric is heaped up to the skies. This performance is an antidote to that practice, which is much more frequent: Gilels-Jochum, Curzon-Szell, Rudolf Serkin-Szell, etc. This is a quieter performance that keeps the dynamism and drama; unaffected, unexaggerated, just plain big and beautiful. Everything and everyone works beautifully. Other performances might awe me more, but this is one I would like to live with.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Kirk List on January 8, 2014
some traits of other pianists, I find the total package unique. This Brahms concerto is similar in many respects to Rudolf Serkin's but by no means identical, despite similar timings
Serkin/Szell/ Cleveland/Sony 1960s: 21:08/14:28/11:30
Serkin/Shaw/Atlanta SO/1986: 21:14/15:43/11:15
I was surpised that Peter's finale is quicker. At 48 minutes, the concerto is in the neighborhood of three other slightly quicker excellent versions: Graffman/Munch/RCA (the quickest), Rubinstein/Reiner/RCA, and Fleisher/Szell/Sony. Peter is extremely precise and plays with
great clarity. One hears more notes and inner voices than in many other readings. He also neglects no dimension/quality of the concerto, including anger, fire, sadness, delicacy/compassion and romantic
yearning. Try the second theme in the first movement and the storm in the second movement, both perfectly characterized. Overall it is probably less volcanic that Graffman and Fleisher,
but more dimensions are addressed, I think. Two other positives: great sound and a gratifying
rapport among Serkin, Shaw and the Atlanta Symphony. As with his Bach, Beethoven, Mozart and Schubert that I know, Serkin rewards long term acquaintance
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By by Paula S on September 18, 2013
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First let me say that the Brahms piano concerto 1 is a favorite of mine. I never tire of listening to it and have sought out performances by Freire, Kissin, Barenboim and Rubinstein who is my favorite for the sheer artistry of a master maestro [can I really say that?] and they are all good.
I accidentally found Peter Serkin's performance and then the disc arrived. I fell in love with it for several reasons. It's a great recording with a top knotch orchestra and conductor. The interpretation is less bombastic than some others and his playing is beautiful. So, even if you love other performances of this piece I recommend this one highly. It has the passion and sadness that Brahms intended I believe.
When you search for Peter Serkin you mostly get his father, Rudolf. Be not deterred and find this one. You won't be sorry.
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