Brahms: Symphony No. 2 & Double Concerto

April 5, 2005 | Format: MP3

$8.99
Also available in CD Format
Song Title
Time
Popularity  
1
17:26
2
7:19
3
8:54
4
16:00
5
9:51
6
5:34
7
9:41

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: January 1, 2004
  • Label: LSO Live
  • Copyright: 2004 London Symphony Orchestra Ltd
  • Total Length: 1:14:45
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B000QQWORA
  • Average Customer Review: 3.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (7 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #434,619 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

3.6 out of 5 stars
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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Santa Fe Listener HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWER on September 28, 2005
Format: Audio CD
The LSO Live label used to be bargain priced, but now it's gone up to mid-price. The sonics are quite good, despite the difficult venue of the Barbican Center in north London. This Brahms Second is lighter and more alert than Haitink's last go with the Boston Sym. on Philips. He does not see Brahms in the profound, conflicted, passionate terms of, say, a Bernstein or Furtwangler. In his smoother, at times sunny approach, Haitink has found a viable way to interpret the Brahms Second, the most pastoral of the four symphonies. The LSO plays suavely, with beautiful balance of chords and instrumental voices.

The late Double Concerto makes for a pairing of contrasts, since it is mysterious, inward, at times gloomy, and not remotely pastoral. Haitink calls on the orchestra's first-desk cello and concertmaster rather than spotlighting two famous virtuosos. Both play very expressively, without undue weight or seriousness. I especially admired the gorgeous tone of both violin and cello, sumptuously caught by the engineers. For all its virtues, this performance could use more passion and distinctiveness, but it joins the Second Sym. to make up a polished and enjoyable CD, if not exctly an essential one.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 50 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on May 23, 2011
Format: Audio CD
Bernard Haitink and the London Symphony Orchestra have a fine relationship in communication. The orchestra is lively and responsive to his demands, a factor that is always best judged from recordings such as this - from a live performance. This particularly well prepared concert was recording in Barbican in London in May of 2003. The reading of the Brahms Symphony No. 2 is fully of light and Haitink finds all the inner voices at times buried in Brahms' thick orchestral writing. This is a bright and joyous reading with excellent responses from all the sections in their solo portions.

The second portion of this recording (actually played first on the CD is the Brahms Double Concerto in which the first desk cellist Tim Hugh and concertmaster , violinist Gordan Nikolitch serve as competent soloists. This reading stresses Brahms' Hungarian dances atmosphere, the soloists both emphasize the gypsy flavor seldom heard in performances of this oddly unsatisfying composition and their conversations are lively and assertive. In all for a live recording the sound is splendid. This CD is a fine opening of the Haitink survey of the works of Brahms. Just don't look for any revelations here. Grady Harp, May 11
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Judy Spotheim on March 10, 2010
Format: Audio CD
After reading all of the Hosanna cries from the rest of the pack, I decided to buy this bargain offer CD.
And I shouldn't...
Sonically - this is a flop in a big way: Compared to another Brahms Double concerto, with the same conductor, Haitink effort with the Concertgebouw/Perlman/Rostropovitch, (which in itself is not one of the greatest recording because of midrange aberrations due to EMI producer's decisions), this LSO bargain CD sounds muffled, distanced and reserved. Sonically the hearing-brain mechanism can not penetrate the sound-field and can not extract any sonic pleasure with this recording - which no doubt is an extensive multi-micked affair. Bad.
The playing of both cellist and violinist lacks the intensity, the warmth, the heart-break and the immediacy that the Oistrakh/Rostropovich, or Oistrakh/Fournier has, and certainly it does not hold the magic and the superb Concertgebouw acoustic.
Also, compared to the (half MONO-EMI-Oistrakh/Fournier) the LSO CD sounds like they are lost in a mist.
And mind you: this LSO CD is a pure digital recording that by nature should have had the "see-through", the attack, the wholesomeness sonic ability - but it does not have this, again, due to the multi-micked recording.
I do not so much have quarrel with the artistic taste of some of the other critics who likes their Brahms to sound like Delius or like Vaughn-Williams, but all it boils into is a reading that is liked to walking in the mud.
The LSO recording is vague, distanced, unfocused, misty, no relief-effect (no 3-D).
If you are looking for a more exciting, direct, bold experience, go somewhere else. This one is not the one.
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3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Matt on February 23, 2006
Format: Audio CD
The 4th movement of the 2nd symphony exemplifies the exhilarating and breathtaking verve with which the LSO customarily play these days, but the gentle lilt of the 3rd movement, the edgy beauty of the 2nd and the nobility of the 1st all equally impress. This performance, under Haitink's sure yet refreshing guide, is truly magnificent. The Double Concerto is barely less brilliant, with excellent integration of the music between soloists and orchestra (hardly surprising perhaps when those soloists are the LSO's leader and principal cellist) and really spicy playing by all. I cannot praise this CD enough.
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