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Brainstorms: Philosophical Essays on Mind and Psychology Paperback – July 13, 1981

ISBN-13: 978-0262540377 ISBN-10: 0262540371 Edition: 1ST

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Product Details

  • Series: Bradford Books
  • Paperback: 377 pages
  • Publisher: The MIT Press; 1ST edition (July 13, 1981)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0262540371
  • ISBN-13: 978-0262540377
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 5.9 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.4 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (6 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #470,114 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

The problems that Daniel Dennett addresses in his essays are crucial ones for philosophy and contemporary science. With a sure touch and a great deal of insight, he has subjected to analysis questions that lie at, or perhaps just beyond, the frontiers of the scientific study of mind and brain. Dennett's work should help guide progress in the understanding of the profound and troubling issues that have intrigued and perplexed critical minds for many centuries. His work is stimulating and impressive....

(Noam Chomsky)

About the Author

Daniel C. Dennett is University Professor and Austin B. Fletcher Professor of Philosophy at Tufts University. He is the author of Sweet Dreams: Philosophical Obstacles to a Science of Consciousness (MIT Press) and other books.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By I. Maryanovsky on December 16, 2011
Format: Paperback
Daniel Dennett's first major work, Brainstorms, is collection of essays relating loosely in subject matter, that is to say, artificial intelligence, consciousness, philosophy of the mind and biology, and philosophy of action; and totally independent in written structure. The essays are each written as a stand alone work. His infamous "On giving libertarians what they say they want," the very essay that began the near half decade debate between the author and libertarian Robert Kane, first appeared in this collection. The work is fantastic, in that it achieves precisely what it attempts to; it inspires, by agreement or otherwise, a new intensity and illuminates new horizons in any reader interested or involved in the study of the subject matter. Highly recommended for intermediate students of Philosophy of Mind; the else should consider reading something more accessible.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Complete Culture on May 29, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is easily my personal favorite out of all the Daniel Dennet work that I've read. Fantastic insights into psychology in particular. Brainstorms is a challenging but rewarding read.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By magellan HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on May 9, 2014
Format: Paperback
I am in general a big fan of Dennett's work as a philosopher of science and his work in the philosophy of mind. He has been an ardent defender of science and especially evolution during a problematic time for science education in this country. Overall, I agree with much of what he says in this book.

I have just one criticism which I discuss in detail below. But I don't want the reader to get the impression I don't like Dennett. It's just that in this case I think there are better answers already available from the sciences themselves. I am referring to Dennett's well known proposal of the two stage theory of decision making. Dennett writes:

"The model of decision making I am proposing has the following feature: when we are faced with an important decision, a consideration-generator whose output is to some degree undetermined produces a series of considerations, some of which may of course be immediately rejected as irrelevant by the agent (consciously or unconsciously). Those considerations that are selected by the agent as having a more than negligible bearing on the decision then figure in a reasoning process, and if the agent is in the main reasonable, those considerations ultimately serve as predictors and explicators of the agent's final decision."

Well, right off the bat I can see several issues here. The first is that this much at least was understood long before Dennett was born. Whether an exact two-stage process is correct, no competent psychologist even a hundred years ago would have disagreed with the fact that decision making involves discriminating between multiple inputs and multiple outcomes.
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