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Bram Stoker's Dracula [Blu-ray]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Gary Oldman, Winona Ryder, Anthony Hopkins, Keanu Reeves
  • Directors: Francis Ford Coppola
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Anamorphic, Color, Dolby, Subtitled, Widescreen
  • Language: English, French, Hungarian, Czech, Polish, Arabic, Turkish, Swedish, Romanian, Icelandic
  • Subtitles: Arabic, Cantonese, Chinese, Czech, Danish, Dutch, English, French, Greek, Hebrew, Hungarian, Korean, Norwegian, Polish, Portuguese, Spanish, Swedish
  • Dubbed: Czech, French, Hungarian, Russian
  • Region: All Regions
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Columbia Pictures
  • DVD Release Date: October 2, 2007
  • Run Time: 128 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (794 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B000TGJ7ZY
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #15,448 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Bram Stoker's Dracula [Blu-ray]" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

Francis Ford Coppola's 1992 Bram Stoker's Dracula is a feverishly inventive movie that often overwhelms its own narrative flow, yet proves irresistible to watch. Coppola's baroque, operatic set design, costumes, and cinematography look as lavish as they did on the film's first release. The director's grab-bag of visual effects are still bold and unabashed, if often over-the-top, and the actors still appear caught up in a certain hysterical pitch that feels a little forced but can be a lot of fun to watch. Gary Oldman's imaginative performance as the titular vampire carries the weight of Coppola's vision of Count Dracula as a tragic-romantic hero with Christ-like overtones. Keanu Reeves still looks a little lost in the pivotal role of Jonathan Harker, the London clerk who finds himself a prisoner in a Transylvanian castle while a 400-year-old vampire makes a play for his fiancée back home (Winona Ryder). Anthony Hopkins is fearless as a daft Von Helsing, and Sadie Frost is very good as the doomed Lucy. --Tom Keogh

Product Description

Gary Oldman, Winona Ryder and Anthony Hopkins star in director Francis Ford Coppola's visually stunning, passionately seductive version of the classic Dracula legend. In BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA, Coppola returns to the original source of the Dracula myth, and from that gothic romance, he creates a modern masterpiece. Gary Oldman's metamorphosis as Dracula who grows from old to young, from man to beast is nothing short of amazing. Winona Ryder brings equal intensity to the role of a young beauty who becomes the object of Dracula's devastating desire. Anthony Hopkins co-stars as the famed doctor who dares to believe in Dracula, and then dares to confront him. Opulent, dazzling and utterly irresistible, this is Dracula as you've never seen him. And once you've seen BRAM STOKER'S DRACULA, you'llnever forget it.

Customer Reviews

Excellent performances by Gary Oldman and Anthony Hopkins.
Daelena
The love story that is one of the main plots of this film is not in the novel and simply does not work.
David A. Wend
It's visually stunning with great special effects, sets, and costumes.
Joker

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

180 of 204 people found the following review helpful By Lawrance M. Bernabo HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on October 22, 2004
Format: DVD
"Bram Stoker's Dracula" or, more properly, "Francis Ford Coppola's Dracula"? The assumption was that the title was chosen to stake a claim to being the film adaptation closest to Bram Stoker's original gothic novel, but the reason was more mundane. Another studio had the rights to the title "Dracula," so a qualification was necessary. Since this 1992 horror film would have the same characters along with the same general plotline as the novel, this seemed reasonable enough. But screenwriter James V. Hart added a significant element to Stoker's novel that justified the movie's potent tagline, "Love Never Dies." As director, Francis Ford Coppola provides the stylistic flourishes, which are this movie's best parts, but Hart is the one who is responsible for the derivations.

In the novel Count Dracula only makes vague reference to the historical Vlad the Impaler, son of the prince known as Dracul (the Dragon), hence the name Dracula (son of the Dragon), when he tells his guest Jonathan Harker of the history of his family. Hart takes advantage of what we know about the historical figure to craft the film's prologue. Vlad (Gary Oldman) is fighting the Turkish invaders, not simply as a prince of Wallachia, but rather as more of a true Christian knight. He succeeds, but the exaggerated rumor of his death reaches his beloved Elisabeta (Winona Ryder), who throws herself to her death from the castle walls. As a suicide she cannot be buried on consecrated ground, and an outraged Vlad renounces God and is somehow transmorgraphies into a vampire as a result of his blasphemy. Then we get to the beginning of the novel.
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127 of 143 people found the following review helpful By Marc Ruby™ HALL OF FAMEVINE VOICE on November 23, 2002
Format: DVD Verified Purchase
When I first saw this film I was completely carried away with Francis Ford Coppola's dark and brooding presentation of the novel that created the modern vampire. The visual composition, the use of color as theme, and the music overloaded my senses to the point that I barely noted the movement of the plot. After all, I had read Stoker's tale often enough to recite it word for word. Why pay too much attention? Going back over the film 10 years later revealed much that I missed the first time.
Of course, the film really tries to capture the feeling of the book rather than be a literal copy, which may bother some aficionados. Coppola has chosen to gradually shift emphasis from a horror tale to the tragic story of an impossible love, without ever losing either thread. By shifting Dracula (Gary Oldman) back and forth from Rumanian hero to terrible monster, and allowing each persona to have its emotional context, he forces a foreboding dilemma on the viewer. Dialog and narration is sparse, just enough rather than florid. Again, nothing is allowed to distract from the building tension.
What completely escaped me on the first viewing was Coppola's vision of a creeping corruption that infects almost all of the characters. British social mores fare little better than those of the vampires. Jack Seward (Richard Grant) is a morphine addict and Lucy Westenra's (Sadie Frost) sexual intensity proves her Achilles heel. Even Van Helsing (Anthony Hopkins) is subject to eerie, almost degenerate moments. This is a less pure, more disturbing world than that of Bram Stoker's imaginings.
Coppola keeps the film working on many levels - foreboding horror, grand romance, sharp social commentary, and transcendental morality play. If love redeems, it only does so at a terrible price. Well worth viewing - several times.
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42 of 47 people found the following review helpful By Shelley Gammon TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on July 29, 2000
Format: DVD
Not since Bela Lugosi has there been a Dracula this sexy, handsome, ugly, lovelorn and pure evil at the same time. Whether portraying the young count in the 16th century or playing himself as a late 19th century ogre of a man with a big white bufont hairdo (with a handsome window's peak to boot) and Edward Scissorhands fingernails, Oldman makes this film what it is. His acting is exquistite as the tortured soul who longs after his lost love and lusts after the taste of human blood.
Post-Lagosi vampires in cinema have always seemed to get the best of the good guys, but in this film taken from Stoker's 19th century novel, good does triumph over evil. Copola endeavored to stick with older cinema effects and he did a superb job. There are some scenes that you will never forget ... a marriage between simple effects and creativity gone wild... especially when the elder count's shadow acts on its own accord. More suave than gory, but there is gore... this is the best production of the tale of Dracula since the invention of color film. If Anne Rice's spin on the vampire tale is more your speed, this film will probably not be up your alley. Violence and sexual inuendo make this a film not suitable for kids.
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32 of 35 people found the following review helpful By dv_forever on August 5, 2008
Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
For months people have been complaining about the visual quality of this particular Blu-Ray title. I'm a Blu-Ray enthusiast and I do enjoy this film so I wanted to find out for myself if all the attacks about it's visual quality had merit. Here are my thoughts...

I bought the Superbit Collection standard DVD of this movie and compared it to this Blu-Ray version. For me, it's a no-brainer, the Blu-Ray is superior. The Superbit version actually looks more garish and brighter than any version I've seen before, be it on TV or VHS. The overly bright colors give the movie a fantasy feel. Rarely did the night scenes in the castle look dark or disturbing. It was all very garish, color wise.

In this Blu-Ray version, Coppola's people, acting on his instructions, toned down the color scheme and made it darker, far more sinister and realistic. I enjoyed the look of the film very much. Those night scenes in the castle are eerie and dangerous in comparison to the overly bright Superbit version. The movie has a more horror like atmosphere to it. In a couple of short scenes, the color is drained and the picture has a nearly black and white look to it. It's strikingly beautiful. On Blu-Ray, instead of the garish haze, the color of Dracula's wardrobe for instance, blood red, leaps off the screen unlike the Superbit DVD.

Although most of the scenes don't have the sharpness or detail you've come to expect from Blu-Ray, I still say it's a very good purchase. Obviously this movie is not going to look like the Blu-Rays of Pixar's Cars or Blade Runner or 2001: A Space Odyssey. I didn't expect it to. The audio quality is just fine. Top notch. Some of the most hilarious features on this Blu-Ray are the multi-language tracks. They have Russian, Romanian and several others.
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Topic From this Discussion
Bram Stoker's Dracula - Collector's Edition; Special Features disk
This DVD includes the following extra content:
- Full introduction by Francis Coppola.
- Full length director's audio commentary
- The Blood is the Life - The Making of Dracula
- The Costumes are the sets - The Design of Eiko Ishioka
- In-Camera - The Naïve Visual Effects of Dracula
- Method and... Read More
Nov 29, 2011 by Camilo Rodrguez |  See all 5 posts
subtitles from portugal?
It is from Portugal!
Oct 1, 2009 by Altamiro S. N. Junior |  See all 3 posts
Workprint?
I don't know where you can obtain a copy, but here you can see the differences between the theatrical and workprint versions: http://www.schnittberichte.com/report.php?ID=1106

In this collector edition some deleted scenes apparently extracted from the workprint were included
Nov 29, 2011 by Camilo Rodrguez |  See all 2 posts
Spanish subtitles??
Yes, it has spanish audio & subtitles
Jun 15, 2009 by Camilo Rodrguez |  See all 3 posts
Bram Stoker's Dracula - Collector's Edition???
I do know that coppola does a commentary track for the movie
Aug 23, 2007 by O. Pineda |  See all 2 posts
Is there a widescreen edition? Be the first to reply
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