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Brave Men Run - A Novel of the Sovereign Era Paperback – June 13, 2008


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 240 pages
  • Publisher: Swarm Press (June 13, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 193486109X
  • ISBN-13: 978-1934861097
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (65 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,048,580 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Matthew Wayne Selznick is an author and creator living in Long Beach, California. --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

Matthew Wayne Selznick is an author, creator, and creative services provider living in Long Beach, California. He's the author of the Parsec Award nominated "Brave Men Run -- A Novel of the Sovereign Era" as well as his latest novel, "Pilgrimage," and a number of other titles set in a variety of storyworlds.

Matt's newest works are the literary collection "Four Stories" and "Reading The Amazing Spider-Man," a non-fiction critical analysis of the first twelve issues of the comicbook with an eye on lessons for writers.

Learn more about Matthew Wayne Selznick and get a free e-book by joining his mailing list at http://www.mattselznick.com.

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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After listening to the podiobook version of this story, I had to buy the book.
Jeffery Doherty
I really loved the characterization and felt that the characters and the story were really well written.
M. Solocinski
This book is for 12 and up listen or read this it will leave you wanting more .
Richard

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

15 of 16 people found the following review helpful By B. Press on February 20, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I've been listening to the podiobook of this book (available at [...]) and it has completely captivated myself, my wife, my 11 year old daughter and my 14 year old son. Told as a revealing and personal narrative, the story is dramatic, well paced, intriguing and very accessible. It's also a great blast from the past for those of us who were in high school and/or college in the fabulous 80s! Warning: Some of the content is probably more suggestive than a pre-teen should be exposed to, but it is relatively brief and easily by-passed for younger consumption.
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16 of 18 people found the following review helpful By P. G. Holyfield on May 8, 2006
Format: Paperback
You don't see many examples of "super-hero" stories in novel form (unless you are speaking of graphic novels, of course). But 'Brave Men Run' begins its existence in a non-graphic form, both written and as an audiobook (actually, the better term is podiobook in this case). I could definitely see 'Brave Men Run' as a graphic novel, but for now I am very happy to have experienced it in its current form.

As with most good novels, when you peel back the layers of 'Brave Men Run' you find more depth. On the surface it is a coming of age novel. The main character endures high-school during an alternate-Earth Reagan era. He falls in love and is transformed by the events that take place around him.

'Brave Men Run' is also an origin story, in comic-book terms. It introduces what character William Donner calls 'The Sovereign,' similar to the 'mutants' of X-Men stories. The twist here is that the story is told through the eyes of main character Nate Charters, a boy with definite differences that has no idea if he is one of these 'Sovereign.' that have announced themselves to the world.

The tone of the story is that of an outsider seeking normalcy in an 80s world. But if being a misfit in high school wasn't enough, this 'Sovereign Declaration' produces a new form of alienation for Nate Charters.

'Brave Men Run' has been called "The Breakfast Club meets the X-Men", and "Spiderman as directed by John Hughes." The 80s feel is realistic across the board, and the voice the author gives to Nate Charters (especially in the podiobook) is on the mark. Children of the 80s will enjoy the references, comic book readers will enjoy the references to the 'silver age' of comics, and the story is enjoyable to boot.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Chrispian Burks on October 31, 2005
Format: Paperback
Brave Men Run is a rare find in books today. The story of Nathan Charters is very easy to relate to and just flat out fun to read. The story is of Nathan Charters, who was born a bit different. He's got some special gifts and finds they also have a knack for getting him into trouble. The story is a coming of age story of friends, first loves and responsiblity. Brave Men Run takes place in the 80's where Nate is attending High School where being different is a curse. Nate has to learn to live with who he is before he can live up to his potential. If you like character driven stories, you'll love this book. If you like comics, you'll like this book. If you are a fan of the 80's, you'll probably like this book. Buy the book and tell your friends about it!
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10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Christiana Ellis on July 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
I listened to the audio version of this book and absolutely loved it. It begins with a perfect sense of time and place, set in a small high school during the 1980's, then adds well-developed, compelling characters, and a genuine mystery. From there it develops into a fascinating alternate history, a remix of superheroes, an adventure story, and a emotionally honest coming of age story with some real surprises. I loved it.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Nick D. on July 13, 2008
Format: Paperback
Brave Men Run is a science fiction novel set in a small American town in the 1980's, dealing with a teenage outcast whose physical peculiarities become more than the subject of highschool ostracism after a scientist makes public the existence of superhumans on live national television at a Washington, D.C. press conference. Despite being billed as "the Breakfast Club meets the X-men", BMR tells it's story with all the sincerity of speculative short fiction and the narrative complexity of true "literature" without the pretentiousness. If you have an interest in a classic coming of age story that never leaves the bounds of reality in exchange for pulpy outrageousness nor ever descending into artsy self-satisfaction, this book is highly recommended. I can't say it will be the best book you have ever read, but it it definitely possesses literary qualities and meaningful themes, as well as a clever and colorful description of the real 1980's (and the thought out incorporation of an alternate history), that many people have long claimed stories about people with superpowers (and about teenagers outcasts for that matter) lack. So with that in mind I posit another description of this novel: The Catcher in the Rye for the X-Men/MTV generation.

All that said, BMR does have it's problems, but none of them are glaringly obvious. Pretentious commentary from this reviewer side, it really is a light but substantial read with a satisfying ending worthy of a chance from even "serious" fiction readers who usually stay far away from genre fiction. I enjoyed it as both a comicbook and pop-science fiction fan AND a literary man, so I hope that you will consider giving it a try.
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