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377 of 406 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Through the eyes of a savage
Aldous Huxley's novel "Brave New World" is both one of the best science fiction books and one of the most brilliant pieces of satire ever written. BNW takes place on a future Earth where human beings are mass-produced and conditioned for lives in a rigid caste system. As the story progresses, we learn some of the disturbing secrets that lie underneath the...
Published on November 8, 2001 by Michael J. Mazza

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19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
2.0 out of 5 stars Reviewed by bookshelfish.blogspot.com
This is one of those books that I have been wanting to read for about twenty years, have started a few times, have been somewhat uneasy about my ignorance of - and now, finally, I did it. Was it worth the long wait? Did I spend my time wondering just what on earth had been the delay, delighting in a classic that had almost gotten away from me, ready to pass it on to...
Published on November 18, 2011 by Bookshelfish, by Jennifer


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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars COMMUNITY, IDENTITY, STABILITY, May 2, 2000
This review is from: Brave New World (Hardcover)
This is an excellent book, depicting a future where babies are born in bottles, 60 identical twins are common. There is no god, only a leader, his Fordliness. There is no lonliness or sorrow due to soma, the drug of the future. Pain is not necessary, and everyone is happy.... or are they?
This book does have some low spots, and thats why it doesnt have 5 stars, but it is well worth reading.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars New World Order, February 15, 2005
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
3 1/2 Stars

Replace soma with television, harvest centers with embrionic stem cell research and controllers with the United Nations and you know where we stand right?

This is a very light and entertaining book that will only take a few hours to finish, but you will think about it for many more. Its dystopian entertainment value more than makes up for its simplistic writing style.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars this is of course a masterpiece!!, January 7, 2002
By 
alper (ANKARA Turkey) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
really no need to write sth about this "cult" novel... in a couple of years everything written by this genius man will come true..i should say this book was the reason why i studied molecular biology and genetics for four years..and it turned out to be the only thing i can work on...to clone myself...(maybe FBI will read this and i will be dismissed from the scientific community hehe:)) i wouldnt care the least...i ordered this by amazon.com coz i couldnt find the complete original text in Turkey unfortunately..this invaluable work of art will stay next to another breakthrough work of art by Orwell, of course 1984, in my library...where would i be now if i hadnt met these i dont know...(the explicit lyrics by PULP!! those of you will remember:))
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Good Book, but a little dated, June 23, 2001
By 
James Riley (Alexandria, VA) - See all my reviews
(REAL NAME)   
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
I was not blown away like many other reviewers with this one. This tale of a frighenly perfect future world has its moments, and there are many of them, but overall I don't ran it with the best of the Future Shock type books. It was hard to find a character to like, as they were all so sterile from theyr future conditioning. Perhaps that was one of the points, if so, fine. But it makes for a dull read. The whole explanation of how things got like they are was done very well, with the teacher giving his lessons, and the lockerroom conversations going on all at once. I wish something similar to that technique could have happened more often. Overall, its a good book worth reading, it just doesn't pack the wight of a 1984 or Lord of the Flies.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars The Man Who Saw Our Future, September 5, 2006
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
Many writers have tried to predict our future, but none have succeeded as well as Aldous Huxley did in Brave New World, first published in 1931. As prophesy and social commentary, this book easily earns five stars. As a novel, the plot is interesting but not up there with the top works of entertainment. Please don't let that stop you from reading this remarkable book. By the way, I recommend buying a version that includes Huxley's "sequel" Brave New World Revisited, published 29 years later. Brave New World Revisited is not a conventional sequel in that it is not a novel. It is commentary, by Huxley, on the 1931 work, on World War II, and on how the world had changed since the original novel was written. Well worth the read.
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3 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars HORRIFYINGLY ACCURATE, March 24, 2001
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
Although this book was written in 1932, it is amazing how much of it is happening now. In the book, people worship the Ford god. Of course, Ford was one of the biggest, if not THE biggest and most important company back then. Cars were beginning to replace the horse-and-buggy way of traveling. Huxley obviously took note of this fact while writing this book, and it's AMAZING how it seamlessly fits in. The Year of Our Lord is The Year of Our Ford in Brave New World. Scary, huh? Babies are mass-produced and predestined as to what field they will work in--batch A will be doctors, batch B will be engineers, etc. There is a drug called Soma that reminds me a lot of the melange in Frank Herbert's Dune. As in most if not all utopian novels, people fornicate with whoever they want and think nothing of it. The writing style is certainly different from the norm. Not exactly Hemingway, but not exactly like those older authors who would spend ten pages describing a mountain range. In between but leaning towards Hemingway. One of the major characters of the story is a man known as the Savage. The first half of the book goes into detail about the society, while the second half focusing primarily on the Savage who is dragged out of his reservation and forced to cope with this Brave New World. The last line of this book was most shocking, but understandable, and is certainly one of the most memorable ending-lines in literature. Before reading it, my expectations weren't so high for this book, because I was under the impressions that any book written before 1980 would be boring. I was wrong. This is one of the very few books that EVERYBODY should read. IGNORE THIS BOOK AT YOUR OWN RISK.
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Frightening Look at Utopian Society, April 16, 2011
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This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
Considered a classic in apocalyptic literature, Brave New World was received to negative reviews when it was published in 1932. This book examines a 2540 utopian society who accepts promiscuous sex and drug use. The forward thinking author creates a carefree, technologically advanced society, produced by genetically bred humans who obey the ruling order passively. The drug "soma" is designed to keep one perpetually calm and happy. In other words, ignorance is bliss. The frightening premise suggests that the individuality and human ambition will be sacrificed for harmony in society.

Incidentally, the use of "For the love of Ford" injected some humor into the dialogue.

Reviewed by Holly Weiss, author of Crestmont
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Riveting... and frightening, July 18, 2001
This review is from: Brave New World (Paperback)
A fantastic voyage into what increasingly appears to be the near-future reveals the finer, or not so fine, qualities of human ingenuity. While production and conformity are praised, individuality and emotion are punished and pushed away. In the end, one person in a caste is like all other people in that caste. There is no love, no mother, no God. Instead, all praise goes to Ford and the only measure of like or dislike is the dislike higher castes have for those beneath them. All totalled, Brave New World is like most dystopian novels with the exception that, unlike most, it is hauntingly close to reality (as is also the case with another great dystopian novel, Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury).
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0 of 1 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Interesting, But Not Very Relevant, March 23, 1998
By A Customer
I am a reader of non-fiction, and I guess I never really learned to appreciate works of fiction. I have a hard time applying their relevance to the real world. Every now and then, I attempt to read an "acclaimed" piece of fiction, and the results are usually the same: I feel like I've missed something. I prefer to learn about and ponder the "horrors" of today's reality by reading history and current events. I find there is more history that I don't know but need to. Reality is far more bizarre than anything that Huxley or Orwell can dream up. By the way, I prefer Orwell's work to Huxley's. I found this work to be very light reading and somewhat entertaining.
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2 of 4 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars Not as good as it's classic dystopian peers, July 12, 2013
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This review is from: Brave New World (Kindle Edition)
Aldous Huxley's dystopian classic "Brave New World" is a dark look into what humanity could become if a worldwide government is given complete control of everything. The story opens with a tour through a London hatching and conditioning center. In this center, fetuses are altered in various ways at various times by exposing them to foreign substances, or by denying them things (like oxygen) for certain periods of time. This is done to create different classes of people by altering their intelligence and conditioning their preferences. The conditioning is continued as the children grow up. They are raised not by parents, but by the government, and are taught to love everything, to enjoy anything they want (including child sex), and to depend on a daily ration of a drug called "Soma". All thought and opinion has been stripped from the public and replaced with whatever propaganda the government has deemed appropriate. In return, everyone is provided for and taken care of by the government.
The story is scary. No doubt about it. This situation - as farfetched as it may seem to some - is in a lot of ways, exactly where society is headed. With the increasing power of the United Nations, the "political correctness" that is being pushed on everyone, and the record number of people signing up for welfare, it's not hard to see that a one government world where the people exchange freedom for provision is not that far away. So from a story idea perspective, Huxley's tale is horrifyingly ingenious - especially since it was written in the early 1930s.
My complaint about the book is that it's not enjoyable to read, it jumps around a lot, and the ending is terrible. The focus of the story moves around from character to character. Huxley spends chapters developing a character, only to abandon that character later in the book for a new one. This is done repeatedly. And while most of those characters do come back into play at different points in the novel, none of them really develop into a "main character" except for maybe John "the savage" and he doesn't even appear in the book till it's half over. ***Spoiler ahead*** What makes matters worse, is that as the book draws to its end, you as the reader are wondering how Huxley plans to wrap all of this up in just a few last pages. How does he do it? He has the main character (John) hang himself. No warning, no debate, no dialogue, and no epilogue to tie things together or elaborate. John is simply upset at the way he handled the mob situation, and the next day someone finds him hanging from the rafters. The end.
As I compare this book to other classic dystopian stories like "1984" or "Fahrenheit 451", I believe that the idea of the book is equally compelling, but not nearly as well executed and certainly not as much fun to read. Classic or not, I can't give this one more that three stars.
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Brave New World
Brave New World by Aldous Huxley (Paperback - October 17, 2006)
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