Customer Reviews


19 Reviews
5 star:
 (17)
4 star:
 (1)
3 star:    (0)
2 star:    (0)
1 star:
 (1)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sadly Overlooked
It's too bad that after Dig! came out--the film chronicling the travails of BJM and their pals The Dandy Warhols during the late nineties and beyond--Anton Newcombe's only claim to fame might be that he comes across as perhaps the biggest jerk in rock and roll. Too bad because despite his abrasive stage persona--which continues to this day, by the way--his music is...
Published on October 25, 2005 by Paul McGrath

versus
9 of 30 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Complete mediocrity
Compared to the other Brian Jonestown albums, this one is lackluster. The band sounds lethargic and uninspired, a big contrast to the previous albums that I love so much. If you don't have all the other albums, I would recommend any of them before this one (especially Give It Back!, Thank God For Mental Illness, or Their Satanic Majesties' Second Request). If you have...
Published on February 26, 2002


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

26 of 28 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Sadly Overlooked, October 25, 2005
By 
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
It's too bad that after Dig! came out--the film chronicling the travails of BJM and their pals The Dandy Warhols during the late nineties and beyond--Anton Newcombe's only claim to fame might be that he comes across as perhaps the biggest jerk in rock and roll. Too bad because despite his abrasive stage persona--which continues to this day, by the way--his music is uniformly excellent, and nowhere displays the bizarre, vindictive, practically psychotic behavior he routinely exhibits on stage.

His albums, in fact, display exactly the opposite. They are so thoughtful, so introspective, so beautifully played and arranged, you have to wonder how he can possibly be the same guy. Bravery, Repetition and Noise might be his best, but it's really hard to say. Hard to say because most of the time one's opinion depends entirely on which of his albums happens to be in the CD changer at any given moment. All are excellent and a day doesn't go by that at least one of them doesn't make an appearance on it.

As the great rock bands of the early sixties drew their inspiration from earlier American rock, blues, and folk, Anton draws his from the early sixties' rock bands themselves, particularly those with a heavy psychedelic bent. Think the Byrds, the Velvet Underground, the early San Francisco sound, and of course, the Rolling Stones when Brian Jones was at his most influential; think acoustic rhythm guitars, spacey electric guitars, various keyboards, horns, winds, beautiful vocal harmonies, and, yes, a sitar here and there; mix it all around in your brain with the full understanding that the songwriter is brilliant, and you get BJM.

Here are the partial lyrics to the song, Sailor, song number six on this CD:

Sailing the ship across your sea, the stars are calling me;

Sailing the ship across the sea, it's so lovely;

Sailing the ship across the sea, and I'm so lonely.

What a lovely sentiment this is, a perfect metaphor for the mysterious, compelling, and ultimately solitary journey that is life. Musically, it could be from a Byrd's album; more generally it is reminiscent of the time when folk went electric, with its elegant rhythm guitar and sinuous synthesizer. Also perfect is the female vocal harmony, which adds just the right touch of wistfulness.

All of the songs are like this: deft arrangements, with thoughtful, often remorseful lyrics. Stolen is another excellent example: a short, lilting guitar piece, the lyrics tell a very brief story about a chance encounter with a girl he knows he will never see again, and ends with the refrain, "oh, oh, broken-hearted." If you've seen Dig! you'll recognize Nevertheless, the song which opens the film, and which is a superb rock song with excellent rhythm. Perhaps the best song on the album is, You Have Been Disconnected, which has an absolutely haunting melody and which is as good as anything anybody ever did in the early sixties.

In fact, everything here compares favorably to that era. There is no filler. And although it is maybe clear who Anton's influences are, he is no mimic. Instead, he is an original, a distinct voice with a distinct sound.

Let's face it, rock and roll is a tricky, hugely competitive, dog-eat-dog business. It is a business in which good management, good luck and, well, good manners are often as important than pure talent alone. The brass ring long ago passed by Anton and the BJM, but his albums are out there, and if you haven't heard of them yet, do yourself a favor and become acquainted. They are the real deal and deserve better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars imperfect, dirty, beauty, March 26, 2002
when i first heard bjm's new record i was a bit dissapointed at the quality of the production. it didn't seem to have the same rock edge "give it back" or "strung out in heaven have." upon further listening i discovered that below the layers of super muddy guitars, noise, and vocals lied one of the darkest, saddest, most sincere rock records i'd heard in a long time. it's a lovely thing to have something knock my socks off very quietly.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


3 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars this is the best BJM record, September 18, 2006
All of BJM's records are excellent but this one is my favorite. The songs are memorable, dreamy, evocative. The mood is a bit somber, and the production appropriately moody. This one tends to favor acoustics a bit over electrics, and has a less hard-rocking sounds than Give it Back or some of the others, but each song is a gem. There is no filler, there are no mediocre tunes.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 2 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Cool as God, June 3, 2006
This band doesn't ride the waves of the many pathetic and short-lived musical fads that have dominated the last 15 years of mainstream music. And it is this rejection of the increasingly parasitic mainstream musical culture that will leave this band's music strong and unwavering against the relentless wind of time and change. Forget your fast food, quick fix band's like `Jet'; this is the Brian Jonestown Massacre! Bravery, Repetition and Noise contains some of the bands strongest work. Some of these songs you simply cannot explain in words. It is not derivative in any sense...it is an absolutely original take on modern music. Nevertheless is a near pefect song, as are many on this album. Telegram is another highlight...but the listener must listen and experience this album. It is more than a collection of songs. It is a body of beautiful sound and must be experienced in the same way that an informed listener may experience something like 'Abbey Road' or 'Magical Mystery Tour', except this is better.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars "Sit back...and we'll pour you a drink!", May 6, 2007
Welcome, tired and weary shopper, to the innermost sanctoms of rock and roll. Put your feet up, and let Anton and his wandering retinue of minstrels delight your senses with the greatest rock and roll album made in the lat 20 years. The Morning After Girls, The High Dials, and the Black Rebel Motorcycle Club are the titans of today's rock movement. But even these elite few worship at the feet of this venerable sage. There can be no comparison, ye, for this is art of the highest caliber!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 5 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Most Excellent Music, January 14, 2002
By 
"johnhenrymuhrer" (Evanston, IL United States) - See all my reviews
For anyone seeking a wonderful music experience this is the album to own. Spanning the decades of rock and strangely beyond rock, BR&N is an experience to be felt. A mix of complex psychedelia and simple melodies any spohisticated listener will not be disapponted.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


4 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Real Rock 'n' Roll, September 3, 2002
By 
"lostindandyland" (Brisbane, QLD Australia) - See all my reviews
I discovered the Brian Jonestown Massacre a few months ago. I purchased most of their albums ... because they are not well known in my country (well...actually no one knows them at all) I couldn't find one music store that had any of their albums. I am a huge fan of the Dandy Warhols, and I have always heard BJM mentioned when people talk of the Dandy's and when the Dandy's themselves are talking. Anyway...this album is my favourite BJM album. I love BJM's sound. Every song on this CD is great. I can listen to it over, and over, and over again, and never get sick of it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


2 of 3 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Mutton Chops Forever, June 30, 2006
This album could possibly be one of the best pieces of contempory art in the United States. Listening to the music conjures images of Jack Kerouac, Beach Boys, Bob Dylan, and the Velvet Undergound, yet the music is strikingly original. Mutton chops forever.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars CD, March 15, 2014
Verified Purchase(What's this?)
This review is from: Bravery Repetition and Noise (Audio CD)
It was a great CD. I knew the songs on it. It's what you'd expect from a CD that has songs you know on it.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


5.0 out of 5 stars A Favorite, December 1, 2012
This review is from: Bravery Repetition and Noise (Audio CD)
It's hard to pick a favorite album of BJM's, but I often wonder if this is it. "Just for Today" and "Nevertheless" can stand up to anything they've ever done, and the first 9 tracks, in short, are all memorable. The cover of "Sailor" is long overdue and brilliant, which also stands out, as does "Telegram" and "Stolen," as for songs that are more accessible and immediately appealing.

So yeah, anyone who likes BJM, I would think, would love this particular album. Nevertheless and Sailor in particular are live staples for them of late.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Bravery Repetition and Noise
Bravery Repetition and Noise by Brian Jonestown Massacre (Audio CD - 2010)
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Rate and Discover Movies
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.