Bad Boy Brawly Brown: An Easy Rawlins Mystery and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$3.74
Condition: Used: Good
Comment: This book has already been loved by someone else. It MIGHT have some wear and tear on the edges, have some markings in it, or be an ex-library book. Over-all itâ?TMs still a good book at a great price! (if it is supposed to contain a CD or access code, that may be missing)
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Bad Boy Brawly Brown (Easy Rawlins Mystery) Hardcover – July 2, 2002


See all 21 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$0.01 $0.01

Best Books of the Year
See the Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 320 pages
  • Publisher: Little, Brown; 1 edition (July 2, 2002)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0316073016
  • ISBN-13: 978-0316073011
  • Product Dimensions: 9.5 x 6.2 x 1.1 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (63 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,646,658 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

Racial tensions and America's civil rights movement have previously figured into Walter Mosley's series about sometimes-sleuth Ezekiel "Easy" Rawlins. But Bad Boy Brawly Brown turns what had been a background element into compelling surface tension. The year is 1964, and though Easy seems settled into honest work as a Los Angeles custodian, he's having other problems--notably, his adopted son's wish to quit school and lingering remorse over the death (in A Little Yellow Dog) of his homicidal crony, Raymond "Mouse" Alexander. Yet he remains willing to do "favors" for folks in need. So, when Alva Torres comes to him, worried that her son, Brawly Brown, will get into trouble running with black revolutionaries, Easy agrees to find the young man and "somehow ... get him back home." His first day on the job, however, Rawlins stumbles across Alva's ex-husband--murdered--and he's soon dodging police, trying to connect a black activist's demise to a weapons cache, and exposing years of betrayal that have made Brawly an ideal pawn in disastrous plans.

Mosley's portrayal of L.A.'s mid-20th-century racial divide is far from simplistic, with winners and sinners on both sides. He also does a better-than-usual job here of plot pacing, with less need to rush a solution at the end. But it is Easy Rawlins's evolution that's most intriguing in Brawly Brown. A man determined to curb his violent and distrustful tendencies, Easy finds himself, at 44, having finally come to peace with his life, just when the peace around him is at such tremendous risk. --J. Kingston Pierce

From Publishers Weekly

Finally. Five years after the last taste (1997's Gone Fishin') and six years after the last full meal (1996's A Little Yellow Dog), Easy Rawlins makes a very welcome return. Now 44 years old, Easy no longer makes a living from doing people "favors." Now he owns a house, works for the Board of Education in Los Angeles and is father to a teenage son, Jesus, and a young daughter, Feather. It's 1964, and while some things have changed, the process is slow and uncertain. Too slow for some, including Brawly Brown, the son of Alva, the girlfriend of Easy's friend, John. Hotheaded Brawly has become involved with a group calling itself the Urban Revolutionary Party, and John and Alva fear the group's unspoken aim is violence and revenge. Friendship and loyalty being still sacred to Easy, he agrees, as a favor, to try to locate and talk to Brawly. As usual, Easy's path is not easy. When a body surfaces, Easy finds himself in the middle of a vicious puzzle where lives are cheap and death the easiest solution. As always, Mosley illuminates time and place with a precision few writers can match whatever genre they choose. He also delivers a rousing good story and continues to captivate with characters readers have grown to love, including the now "dead" Mouse, who still plays an important role in Easy's chronicle.
Copyright 2002 Cahners Business Information, Inc.

Customer Reviews

This latest novel was fast paced, thoughtful and a thoroughly good read.
"altergurl"
I would highly reccomend it and I am looking forward to the next book to find out what really happened to Mouse.
Educator1
Also the loss of his best friend is on Easy's mind daily and sometimes overwhelms him.
The RAWSISTAZ Reviewers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By FictionAddiction.NET on October 14, 2002
Format: Hardcover
The mystery in "Bad Boy Brawly Brown" serves as a device through which the black perspectives of the 60's civil rights' movement are explored. The people in this story ranged the full spectrum of attitudes, from the apathy of the older generation through noble ideals to the militant actions of youth. Never once does the narrative avoid the honesty of portraying the times. In the midst of all this, Easy Rawlins strives to rescue Brawly Brown from the troubles of the times.
While still coming to terms with the death of his best friend, Mouse, Easy Rawlins accepts a request to find Brawly Brown and help him. Easy's long time friend, John, asks him to find his girlfriend's boy, Brawly, whom John had hired on at his construction site. Since becoming involved with the Urban Revolutionary Party, Brawly had dropped out of touch with his family. His mother was scared that he might be in serious trouble. For the fee of one home cooked meal, Easy agreed to look into it.
Throughout the novel, black culture is presented in all its colors. Dialogue varies with the education level and social status. "'I'm no cop brother. I heard about this place down at Hambones. They said you guys do a lot a talkin' and I decided to come on down and hear you out.' My diction and grammar slid into the form I wanted junior to hear."
Status is determined as much by the shade of skin color as well as well. The darker a black person's skin is, the more African he is, and the more trusted he is within the black community. Those with paler skin are shunned for betraying their race by the accident of birth. Filled with distinct characters, there is no room in "Bad Boy Brawly Brown" for stereotypes.
If there is any weak aspect of "Bad Boy Brawly Brown," it is that the cast of characters is simply too large.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on September 20, 2002
Format: Hardcover
Mouse is not dead. In "Bad Boy Brawly Brown" Mouse's spirit pervades nearly every page, certainly every chapter and, ultimately, Mr. Ezekiel Porterhouse Rawlins finds that, whether dead or alive, Mouse has given him the solution to the problem of Brawly Brown. And Walter Mosley offers a solid hint that Easy's quest to purge himself of his guilt over Mouse's death will be continued in the next installment in the series.
I can't believe that I'm saying this: This book was worth every day I've waited for it over the past six years. After completing the book moments ago, even as a dedicated Mosley fan I was struck numb by the power of his words and his vision here. Other reviewers have commented on that already. But because Mosley is writing about a now well-documented period of history and my life when secret police "intelligence" units along with the FBI ant others were concocting provocations and committing extra-judicial murders much as Mosley describes them in his novel, perhaps it resonated with me more than it might with other readers, or at least resonated differently. I knew people such as Mosley describes in this novel in the late '60s and early '70s, people filled with the desperate passions of revolutionaries and dreams of a greater freedom for their humanity. Mosley honors the memories of many members of a generation that struggled and dreamed by allowing their many voices to speak through his characters with all their flaws and strengths.
The brightest threads of Mosley's multi-textured and intertwining plots are those which reveal Rawlins, the man, unobstructed by the ferocious shadow of Mouse, and the torture of human relationships, especially those of family.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By B. McGovney on August 1, 2004
Format: Mass Market Paperback
This is the first book I've read in the "Easy Rawlins" series of detective novels. I heard Mosely speak once in a panel discussion of the legacy of Raymond Chandler, and since then I've been looking for an opportunity to read his stuff. Chandler wrote novels about corruption, about institutions that you expect to be stalwart and only gradually find out are corrupt to the core. In Mosely's books, the corruption is taken for granted up front. This is a book about relationships, about the ad-hoc institutions and problem-solving methods people put together by themselves when they KNOW the legitimate system is crooked. Easy Rawlins isn't a paid detective; he's a problem-solver doing a favor for a friend. This puts a fresh new face on the detective genre. I've never read the first Rawlins book, Devil in a Blue Dress, but I think that I'll be looking for a copy soon.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Larry Scantlebury on October 26, 2003
Format: Hardcover
It seems more often than not that the heroes of the mystery genre are white. So for many of us to go back into a racially subjugated time, here in the early sixties, we may realize that we never heard the other side of the story. We missed the other background. No longer with Walter Mosely.
Mr. Mosely brings us back to the past, the very recent past, where the black detective really had all the problems the white detective had, i.e. the bad guys would attempt to put him in harms way, plus the subjugation of the (for the most part) white police force.
So it would be a mistake for us to say that Mr. Mosely brings a "refreshing" view. Painful, perhaps. Unfortunate, certainly. But always very well written.
Here Ezekial Rawlins is asked by his friend, John, to help his girlfriend Alva's son stay out of the limelight or rather, the searchlights of the police department. Brawly has been influenced by a Black Group named the First Men. Whether they truly seek only the leverage and subsequent parity that equal education can bring (the 1960's in Los Angeles was only a few years after Brown vs. Board of Education) or as the police believe, they were but a front for gun running, bank robbery and revolution, is denied to us as it has been in the last 40 years.
However, Mosely doesn't pass judgment on this. Who's to say that in some arenas of social justice the end . . . But we're not asked to go there. We follow Easy, troubled by a violent past he cannot avoid, haunted by the sins of omission and commission, as the bodies turn up. Easy is a noble man who struggles, like Marlowe before him, Spenser and Cole, to maintain his own sense of integrity. Like some of the music of that time, "(you) who are on the road, must have a code, that you can live by.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

More About the Author

Walter Mosley is one of America's most celebrated and beloved writers. His books have won numerous awards and have been translated into more than twenty languages.

Mosley is the author of the acclaimed Easy Rawlins series of mysteries, including national bestsellers Cinnamon Kiss, Little Scarlet, and Bad Boy Brawly Brown; the Fearless Jones series, including Fearless Jones, Fear Itself, and Fear of the Dark; the novels Blue Light and RL's Dream; and two collections of stories featuring Socrates Fortlow, Always Outnumbered, Always Outgunned, for which he received the Anisfield-Wolf Award, and Walkin' the Dog. He lives in New York City.