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Brazil (Criterion Collection) [Blu-ray]


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Product Details

  • Actors: Jonathan Pryce, Robert De Niro, Katherine Helmond, Ian Holm, Bob Hoskins
  • Directors: Terry Gilliam
  • Format: Multiple Formats, Blu-ray, Dolby, DTS Surround Sound, NTSC, Widescreen
  • Language: English
  • Region: Region A/1 (Read more about DVD/Blu-ray formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.78:1
  • Number of discs: 2
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Criterion Collection
  • DVD Release Date: December 4, 2012
  • Run Time: 142 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (59 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B009D004X6
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #9,794 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

Special Features

  • Restored high-definition digital transfer of Terry Gilliam’s 142-minute director’s cut, supervised by Gilliam, with DTS-HD Master Audio 2.0 surround soundtrack
  • Audio commentary by Terry Gilliam
  • What Is “Brazil”?, a thirty-minute on-set documentary by Rob Hedden
  • The Battle of “Brazil”: A Video History, a sixty-minute documentary by author and film writer Jack Mathews about the controversy surrounding the film’s release
  • The “Love Conquers All” version of Brazil, a ninety-four-minute cut of the film produced by the studio in an attempt to make it more commercial, with commentary by Brazil expert David Morgan
  • The Production Notebook, a collection of supplements featuring a trove of Brazil-iana from Gilliam’s personal collection: a short documentary on the screenplay, featuring interviews with screenwriters Gilliam, Charles McKeown, and Tom Stoppard; Gilliam’s storyboards for unfilmed dream sequences, animated and narrated by Morgan; visual essays on the film’s production design and special effects; a visual essay on Brazil’s costumes, narrated by costume designer James Acheson; and interviews with Gilliam and composer Michael Kamen on the score
  • Trailer
  • PLUS: A booklet featuring an essay by film critic David Sterritt

  • Editorial Reviews

    In the dystopic masterpiece Brazil, Jonathan Pryce (Glengarry Glen Ross) plays a daydreaming everyman who finds himself caught in the soul-crushing gears of a nightmarish bureaucracy. This cautionary tale by Terry Gilliam (Fear and Loathing in Las Vegas), one of the great films of the 1980s, now ranks alongside antitotalitarian works by the likes of George Orwell, Aldous Huxley, and Kurt Vonnegut Jr. And in terms of set design, cinematography, music, and effects, Brazil, a nonstop dazzler, stands alone.

    Customer Reviews

    Odd and fantasic i like the unhappy ending.
    Stefan Persson
    It looks similar in quality to the Universal Blu-ray of the 132-minute version.
    keviny01
    The only option worth purchasing on bluray for this title.
    S. Jack

    Most Helpful Customer Reviews

    25 of 26 people found the following review helpful By keviny01 on December 11, 2012
    Format: Blu-ray
    The Criterion editions are the only ways to obtain the longer, director-approved 142-minute version of the 1985 part-Orwellian-sci-fi, part-slapstick-comedy masterpiece "Brazil". All other Region-1 DVDs and Region-A Blu-rays are of the shorter, 132-minute studio version for US distribution that is not of director Terry Gilliam's original vision.

    The 2-disc Criterion Blu-ray sports a director-approved high-def 1080p video transfer. It looks similar in quality to the Universal Blu-ray of the 132-minute version. But the Criterion disc shows a little more grain, which usually indicates less digital noise reduction was used, a usual characteristic of Criterion Blu-rays (except "The Children of Paradise", which is not their fault).

    The Criterion disc offers a DTS lossless 2-channel audio track, to be decoded into surround with Dolby Pro Logic. This is Criterion's way of supporting those with legacy audio equipments, since 2-channel audio can be carried by older means of transmitting digital audio, such as S/PDIF (coaxial or TOSLINK optical cable). Curiously, Criterion does use modern 6-channel lossless bitstream audio (DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1) on a lot of their Blu-rays. The Universal Blu-ray also offers DTS-HD Master Audio 5.1.

    The Criterion Blu-ray also includes the excellent 1996 full-length audio commentary by Gilliam, the same track used in all previous Criterion editions: 2006 DVD (Disc 1 re-release), 1999 DVD (3-disc set), and 1996 laserdisc. Gilliam talks about the making of his film and the challenges it entailed, and the film's long running time makes this a very informative track.
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    7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By C. Sawin VINE VOICE on December 8, 2012
    Format: Blu-ray
    Being particularly fond of most of Terry Gilliam's work, "Brazil" is without question his masterpiece. Gilliam has always seemingly had this monstrous battle with whatever studio he's working with at the time whenever he sets out to make a motion picture and "Brazil" is no different in that aspect. Despite what had to be cut for budgetary reasons and all of the clashes Gilliam had with studio head Sid Sheinberg, "Brazil" seems to be one of the few times Gilliam's brilliance has ever really been allowed to fully come together.

    What makes "Brazil" so special is how everything looks. Even though the film was made nearly 30 years ago, practical special effects have helped the film look just as amazing now as it did when it was first released. There's this emphasis on technology that is so peculiar because it's as if an inventor got a hold of a bunch of equipment from that time period and tried to make it more advanced without really succeeding. There's the troublesome air ducts, the tiny TV screens, typewriters, giant magnified lenses, cameras on wheels, and light up menus at fancy restaurants. Sam's apartment alone is riddled with automatic drain stoppers, self ejecting toasters, and sinks that turn on by themselves.

    The film never really stops having this claustrophobic atmosphere to it, as well. Everything Sam does is in this tiny environment. His original work place is rather large, but it's always occupied by a mass of people and dozens upon dozens of typewriters while his office at Information Retrieval is so small that it barely has room for Sam at all. His apartment is eventually overloaded with air conditioning ducts. He drives one of the tiniest cars ever.
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    5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By birdman on May 28, 2013
    Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
    I was torn between getting the Criterion Blu- Ray or the Universal release. But seeing all of the extras that came with the Criterion, and the fact that the transfer was approved by Terry Gilliam, I finally opted for the Criterion version.

    It looks fantastic and at 142 min. is 10 minutes longer than the Universal version. My main complaint is the sound; like most DTS soundtracks, when the volume is turned up to a comfortable volume for dialogue, inevitably you come to an action sequence that blasts you out of your chair, forcing you to turn the volume back down until the next sequence of dialogue. However in 5.1 surround, you can generally have the center channel set higher to even things out. Unfortunately the Criterion version of Brazil merely remasters the stereo soundtrack of the original film into DTS 2.0 (Stereo) which divides the dialogue, music and sound effects between your right and left channels only. I was constantly turning my volume down during explosions, etc. only to turn it up again when the characters were speaking.

    Looking at the specs of the Universal edition I see that the soundtrack is DTS 5.1; I wish the Criterion edition would've at least given us that option.

    It remains a great film and I'm glad to have it for the Gilliam approved "Director's cut" with all the extras, but if I found a cheap copy of the Universal version, I'd be tempted to get it just to compare the soundtrack quality.
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    4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By YearningForTheOldNewDays on January 14, 2013
    Format: Blu-ray Verified Purchase
    I originally saw this film in its very short theater run in 85 and was blown away by it. Little did I know at the time all that had taken place just getting this film released and when I finally got the original Criterion 3 DVD set with the director's cut and the whole story, I was even more impressed by what Gilliam and the others who contributed to this film had accomplished. The print of the film on the DVD had some flaws, as they were apparently unable to obtain the original and/or restore it, but it is still a great acquisition for anybody who doesn't have Blu-Ray capability for whatever reason. This latest version is almost flawless as far as the actual movie, although the extras are still in the same SD, grainy, scratched state as the original 3 DVD set. This one comes on two 50 GB Blu-Ray discs and contains the same content as the 3 DL DVD set, but the 1080P movie is excellent in quality, and OF COURSE as far as content is one of the greatest movies of all time. I rank it in my top ten and I am damn critical as my top 100 currently only has 84 movies listed! I would ask anybody who has simply heard that this is just a really weird movie and not to waste time on it, to forget that and check it out. It is more timely than ever and will NEVER become dated due to the prescience shown by the creators. I agree with Gilliam that Kim may not have been the best choice for Jill, but the script and sets are so spectacular that this is a minor point and she still pulls off a very admirable performance. It is only when one looks at the enormity of the other actor's accomplishments that she seems to come up a bit short. I love To Kill a Mockingbird, but the casting of Jim (Phillip Alford) was absolutely horrible and the movie is still a great one.Read more ›
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    Topic From this Discussion
    Terry Gilliam's "Brazil" and it's releases.
    Er... no offense, here, but what the heck are you talking about?

    There were only two different DVD editions produced by Criterion -- the non-anamorphic 3-disc 1999 edition, and the later anamorphic upgrade, which could either be purchased in a single-disc version (for those of us who already... Read More
    Dec 6, 2012 by The Bandsaw Vigilante |  See all 5 posts
    preorder price went up fast!
    $20.99 right now, as part of their December Blu-Ray sale (most other Criterions are also around 45-55% off as well, right now).
    Dec 6, 2012 by The Bandsaw Vigilante |  See all 2 posts
    Does the Criterion blu ray include theatrical cut along with director's...
    I do not believe so. It includes the director's cut and the "happy ending" version. The theatrical cut is on the Universal Blu-ray B004V8W54Q.
    Mar 20, 2013 by Craig S. Thom |  See all 4 posts
    subtitles Be the first to reply
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