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Bread: The Breads of the World and How to Bake Them at Home Paperback


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: Lorenz Books; First Edition edition (January 1, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 068187922X
  • ISBN-13: 978-0681879225
  • Product Dimensions: 12 x 9.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.8 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,060,858 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.1 out of 5 stars
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See all 14 customer reviews
I have made at least 15 of the recipes from this book and they all turn out very well.
Steve
One of the best features is the great pictures accompanying many steps in the instructions - very helpful!
Rebecca S. Cotton
This book makes an excellent gift for the cook/baker who wants to turn out better or different bread.
Norman Strojny

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Jimmy C. Philips on August 8, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book is lavishly illustrated, as any cook book should be. But it has more than just pretty pictures. You get lots of pictures that illustrate technique. It also offers really detailed instructions on fermented dough starters used in French and Italian breads. For a next step, you might want something that spends more time on weights and ratios and the finer points of technique. But this is a great book for a baker with some experience who wants to make the next step.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Sarah Henry on August 14, 2012
Format: Paperback
I honestly had to check several times to make sure the book I had was the same one everyone was reviewing as my experience was so very different.

Yes, it has great pictures and really cool info about the breads of many different cultures, but for me that was the end of the books usefulness.

I am not a novice baker, I started baking around the age of 10 (I am now 37) and it is, hands down, one of my very favorite things to do. I was rather surprised to find that the very first recipe I tried, added all the wet to the dry ingredients. I typically do it the other way around to moderate the amount of flour. What the heck, I thought, I'll assume the book makers know what they are doing. It was horrid and obviously had way to much flour. I added a bit more wet just to hold it all together and went through the steps to finish it. As I had expected the resultant bread was nasty.

At that point I figured I'd just keep out half the flour to moderate this problem. It's easier to add than subtract. Next recipe I made sure to read through the recipe a few times to know what I was doing. Checked to make sure all my ingredients were correct and good. (I bake enough to have what I need and to have fresh ingredients) I wanted to make sure to eliminate user error. I even tried a whole new recipe. Fail. This time I held out half the flour, and once the wet was mixed in I found not only did it not need any more but the flour still seemed high.

So I tried again.

And again. Different recipes and yet still the same problem. I got one (scottish morning rolls) to turn out close to what I though it should be. It wasn't fantastic, but it was eatable. Today was the final straw. I tried the first recipe I'd tried.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Steve on February 16, 2009
Format: Paperback
I have made at least 15 of the recipes from this book and they all turn out very well. As with any baking book, there's going to be the need for some practice to learn how to turn out a good loaf, but once you have the basics down, the variety of recipes and consistently delicious products make this book a great buy.
Among my favorites are the recipes for focaccia and English muffins. The muffins are fantastic fresh off the griddle.
The recipes are clear, and I have not found errors yet after reading practically the entire book. The background information at the beginning is fairly interesting as well for thumbing through while waiting for yeast to proof.
The only two recipes I would adjust that I have made so far are the pretzels and bagels. For the recipe size, these came out smaller and crisper than I like, so I would double the recipe but make the same number of pieces.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By Norman Strojny on December 27, 2008
Format: Paperback
"Bread" (the breads of the world and how to bake them at home), Hermes House, copywrite 2003, by Anness Publishing Ltd. of London, 256 pp., by Christine Ingram and Jennie Shapteer, is an excellent book for baking the breads of the world. There are many excellent color photos to show the finished products as well as some of the steps in the preparation of the breads. The recipes and directions are easy to follow.

Baking bread is a learned art/skill. No one turns out a good loaf on the first try. However, anyone with patience can, eventually, turn out a good loaf of bread, each time. On the other hand, patience, skill, and a variety of intangibles sometimes result in an ability to turn out an exceptional loaf of bread.

Personally, I am still working at it. However, this book is a wonderful resource for techniques, especially if I want to try something different. Try it. This book makes an excellent gift for the cook/baker who wants to turn out better or different bread.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca S. Cotton on November 21, 2008
Format: Paperback
I love this book! I've made several of the recipes, such as challah, pita and baguette over and over again. My husband (who studied in France) said the baguette tastes just like what he ate in France. I plan to give this book to people as gifts (if I can find copies!). It's got recipes from around the world as well as educational articles on the components of bread and how to make it. One of the best features is the great pictures accompanying many steps in the instructions - very helpful!
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5 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Oscar's mom on October 31, 2006
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The photographic presentation of the breads in this book is beautiful. However, the reader will soon find that many of the photographed breads have no recipe provided in the book. So, while the reader may learn of the types of breads prepared in numerous areas of the world, there may be no recipe for the particular breads the reader finds interesting. I found this frustrating. Still, I tried quite a few recipes in the book and each turned out very well due to the detailed instructions provided for each recipe. I think the novice breadmaker will benefit also because of the amount of detail provided at the beginning regarding flours, required supplies, definitions of breadmaking terms, etc.
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