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Bread Matters: The State of Modern Bread and a Definitive Guide to Baking Your Own Hardcover


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 416 pages
  • Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing (September 15, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0740773739
  • ISBN-13: 978-0740773730
  • Product Dimensions: 8.8 x 7.6 x 1.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.7 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.2 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (52 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #269,135 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'What an important book; passionate and polemical and full of truth. The chapter too on gluten-free baking is original and inspiring.'Bee Wilson, Sunday Telegraph and New Statesman 'This will be the most important book on baking since the publication of Elizabeth David's "English Bread and Yeast Cookery".' Rose Prince 'Makes for interesting reading, and Whitley makes the information accessible by using easy-to-follow tables where appropriate!Throughout the book Whitley has dotted interesting historical footnotes to recipes and practical tips to recover from baking disasters. The book is comprehensive in its span of recipes and its examination of the baking process.' Caterer and Hotelkeeper 'A superb and necessary new book.' Bee Wilson, The Sunday Telegraph 'Every bit as feisty as the title implies!a good sense book that includes recipes for sour-dough and gluten-free baking.' The Independent 'The best food book of the year. Part counterblast against the shocking state of British baking, part manifesto for us all to get our hands floury and do something about it. Essential reading for anyone who cares about their daily loaf.' Financial Times Pick of the Year 'Committed to the cause of getting us to eat properly, Bread Matters explains clearly what's wrong with commercial bread and how to bake your own.' Independent --This text refers to an out of print or unavailable edition of this title.

About the Author

In 1976, Andrew Whitley converted a stone barn next to his house into a small bakery. There, he refined his bread making techniques and grew his own organic fruit and vegetables. In 2002, he founded Bread Matters, an organization devoted to improving the state of bread. He teaches baking classes and continues his mission in Cumbria, England. In 2008, he was one of the founders of the Real Bread Campaign in Britain, which works to increase the production and enjoyment of wholesome bread made without additives.

More About the Author

In 1976, Andrew Whitley opened his award-winning bakery near his home in Cumbria, England. Since then he has perfected the craft of bread baking, and in 2002 he founded Bread Matters, an organization devoted to improving the state of bread. He is also one of the founders of the Real Bread Campaign in Britain, which began in 2003. He still resides in Cumbria where he teaches baking classes and continues to promote bread without additives.

Customer Reviews

Highly recommend for those who like to bake their own bread.
Dr Adam Weiss
If you just want to make a good loaf of bread, you can use this book to learn how, but it is only half the reason to buy it at most.
Aceto
There are full color picture sections showing off the various baked wonders that are the recipes in the book.
Kitten Kisser

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

17 of 18 people found the following review helpful By liat2768 TOP 500 REVIEWER on November 19, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
This author is quite simply passionate about bread! He is very openly on a mission to open the eyes of the public to the empty calories and harmful chemicals that have been masquerading as bread for decades now.

The first quarter of the book may turn some readers off since it is quite 'dry', but it is probably the most important part of the book!The author details the modern process of commercial breadmaking with all it's faults and dangers. Then he moves one to reiterate that making bread is not the mystery so many of us think it to be. The layout, while dull to look at, is chock full of excellent information on tools, methods, bread making steps and descriptions of ingredients. The explanations are clear and in a simple language that makes the book accessible to most readers.

The 50 bread making recipes in this book are scattered in chapters titled :
First bread and rolls
Simple Sourdough
Bread-a meal in itself
Of crust and crumb
Sweet breads and celebrations
Easy as pie
(and Miraculously!) Gluten Free baking!!

(on a personal note the last chapter will be a lifesaver for me since, two weeks after getting this book, I discoverd that my son is allergic to Gluten!)

I have tried out a few of the recipes in the 'first breads' chapter (Basic bread, Milk Bread) and one from the Sweet breads chapter. All turned out great although, having baked bread before, I was skeptical of the consistency of some of the doughs. What was great about the book is that the author forsees the questions that will pop up in the novice or experienced baker's mind (shouldn't I add some flour now? This is way too sticky!) and addresses them promptly in the recipe.
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8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Aceto TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on April 19, 2010
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Bread Matters is a punny title, the kind loved by the British, who we learn quickly now eat forty-five per cent less bread than fifty years ago. Yet they are beginning to look American. SO Mr. Whitley is writing for his people lest they cruise the American path of morbidly cheap "food". Criticisms of America are mine only. The polite Mr. Whitley has the decency to scold only his own.

Bread was good for us before we let go of it to the corporate bakers. If you are interested in corporate malpractice, this book is for you. If you want to understand, for good and for bad, bread as a nutritionist would, this book is for you. The information here is important if you imagine carbohydrates to be bad. If you worry about glycemic response there is food here for thought and for life. If you just want to make a good loaf of bread, you can use this book to learn how, but it is only half the reason to buy it at most.

Ultrafast dough, used by corporate bakers is as pernicious as every other "ultra" facet of our ultra marketed ultra miserable society. Ultra fast dough is the product of ultra fast chemicals that puts you into that ultra dirt nap.

Bread is not to be hurried. Mix ingredients and let them rest rather than jumping straight into kneading. Give your little enzymes a head start and they will help you back by developing structure while you knead later.

Go slowly to load enough water. Enjoy icky sticky by lofting your dough and kneading in the air. The dough will leggo your fingers soon enough.

Same with rising. Slow. I even take extra days to make a new starter when I move to let the local yeasties find it and add their tang. Beers used to be so local because their own yeasts had a natural radius of around 25 miles.
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22 of 27 people found the following review helpful By Ursiform TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on October 25, 2009
Format: Hardcover Vine Customer Review of Free Product ( What's this? )
Although this book does explain baking, and does contain recipes, it is in large part an attack on industrial bread production, and a call for everyone to eat bread baked from organically grown, whole grain, stone ground, flour; preferably baked yourself, otherwise bought from a local bakery. Parts of his argument are strong and well supported, others less well so. One thing I noticed as he builds his story is that for some parts of his chain of argument he cites studies to support his point, while other parts are argued largely by assertion. If you read the book, watch for this.

In the 1950s bread sales in Britain (from where he writes) and America began to be dominated by industrially-produced bread. Time is money, and the large bakers wanted to turn out the product quickly, not wait all day for the dough to rise. They modified the product by using additives and large amounts of single-culture yeast to speed production; in the process, they changed the nature of the bread.

Additives are a big deal to Whitley. Although all of the additives used in breads are considered safe by health authorities, he presents evidence that some additives are not necessarily good for you. But that isn't enough for him, he finds fault with every additive he identifies as used in bread. In some cases it's merely that they add no nutritional value or might be made from genetically modified plants. In these cases he fails to show that they are harmful, they just fall outside his paradigm of what is right.

Whitley discuss the various milling methods and resulting content of flour. In the case of wheat, I think it is well known that white flour is significantly deficient in nutrients compared to the original wheat.
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