Amazon.com: Customer Reviews: The Breakfast Club (25th Anniversary Edition) [Blu-ray]
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on September 13, 2003
Just when you couldn't bare being in school during the week, imagine having to be forced to spend a Saturday there. That's what happens to five high school students who are forced to spend a Saturday detention together. None of them have anything in common and none of them are friends. Each is an opposite from the other. The group consists of a brain, a prom queen, a jock, a basket case and a trouble-maker. A unique and unexpected bond is formed by the five teens as the day goes on, with all sorts of different states of emotion going on for each of them. No matter happens on Monday, all five of them will always that one Saturday together; therefore, forever labeling them "The Breakfast Club."
Not only is this a classic film, it's one of my personal favorites. I loved it when I was little and I love it now as I am in my twenties. It's so refreshing to have a brutally honest film that plays on all of your emotions as this movie does. And even though this was shot in the eighties, people can still relate to it now in 2000. This is why it is so effective and powerful.
The movie is so memorable that you will most likely repeat every single line during each viewing. The actors do a terrific job of portraying their roles flawlessly. The script is funny and touching at the same time. Everything that is shown in the movie is crucial and significant; being that there isn't a single minute in the movie that goes wasted.
This new DVD edition, while it may not be the most spectacular of DVDs, is a lot better than the previous version. They did an excellent job of producing a successful remastered version of the movie that looks and sounds excellent. You can even watch it in DTS; that is, if your system carries it. I'm afraid there's not much to offer in the special features department. It really is a shame, being that this is such a classic movie. Still, the way the film looks and sounds is worth the price alone.
"The Breakfast Club" is a terrific movie that still has the same effect on us as it did years and years ago. It's funny, tragic, touching and honest. If you haven't seen this movie yet, please, make sure that the next time you are at a video store that you pick this up and check it out. You have no idea what you're missing if you don't. Still a favorite after so many years, this film surpasses so many movies that we see today. An excellent achievement on all fronts.
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on June 2, 2001
There are plenty of reviews here about the movie, so there is no sense in writing another.
This review is about the DVD. I will tell you up front that this DVD looks like a direct copy off VHS. I have seen the VHS version about 2 times this year and when the title song comes on, the audio fades in and out. Not bad, but you can definitely see some age in it. The DVD is EXACTLY the same. The sound is of no higher quality.
There is no widescreen, just a full screen with the same picture quality as VHS. It's not horrible, but if you are the type of person who buys DVDs for the superior picture quality, you are definitely going to be unhappy with this.
The movie itself is EXCELLENT, I love it, but the DVD transfer from VHS isn't the best.
As for bonus features, you get bios for all of the actors. The trouble is, the information included is the same as you can find on the internet movie database (imdb) as well as fan sites. If you have read a fair amount on any of the actors and know their biography fairly well, this DVD offers nothing new.
There are also some brief production notes about where and how this movie was done, and some quotes from the cast and crew.
Again, if you have done any research online and gone to any fan sites or even a site dedicated to John Hughes, you will find nothing new here. No interviews, a little behind the scenes, some background detail, but in the big picture, not much else.
Just a forewarning.
I bought the DVD because unlike VHS tapes, a DVD CD doesn't wear out. But if you watch the VHS version, then the DVD, the quality is the same. DVD is not any better.
So overall, EXCELLENT movie, but not a great transfer. Still, if you are a fan, definitely add it to your collection, but if you buy DVDs for the extras, you will be very disappointed with this.
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on June 30, 2004
Some question the durability of "The Breakfast Club," saying that the themes and plotlines do not hold up in today's teen society. As a 15-year-old, I would like to say that that is thoroughly untrue. 19 years after its release, "The Breakfast Club" is still a truthful, relateable account of teenagers and their personalities, and the ways in which they interact with each other. Sure, the stereotypes of the characters may be a bit exaggerated -- but that's necessary in order to get the point across. Watching this movie, I feel as if I know these people, or at least I've run across them at one point in my high school career.
The plot, as most people know, involves five different kids being assigned Saturday detention together. Each kid represents a typical high school stereotype -- a princess (Molly Ringwald), a jock (Emilio Estevez), a brain (Anthony Michael Hall), a basket case (the excellent Ally Sheedy), and a criminal (Judd Nelson). At the beginning of the day, none of them know each other, except for the princess and the jock. Throughout the day, they learn more about each other and work at tearing down the stereotypes that pit them against each other. As for the reviewer who said this isn't realistic that they would open up so much to each other -- it absolutely is. Put five kids into a room without an adult for nine hours, and they will talk about anything.
The beauty of this movie is the depth of the characters beyond the stereotypes -- particularly the nerd, Brian, who as we find out in the movie has problems well beyond what people think of him. He is the one that I most relate to in the movie. Watch "The Breakfast Club," and see who you most relate to. It's a great experience. Beyond the social commentary aspect, it's also just a funny movie. The jokes come at breakneck speed, especially for the first half of the movie (before it gets somewhat serious). The actors are also very enjoyable in their roles, particularly Ally Sheedy and Anthony Michael Hall. Highly recommended.
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If you graduated from high school in the 1980s and haven't seen this film, you must have been locked in a cave.
John Hughes delivers the definitive nostalgic teen movie of the Generation X crowd. The cast made up the '80s "brat pack" with Judd Nelson, Emilio Estevez, Ally Sheedy, Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall. It's hard to believe while seeing this film that Ringwald and Hall were the only real high school aged performers... the others were in their mid to late 20s during filming.
While modern teens may not find this as "sophisticated" as over-sexed comedies like "American Pie," anyone can appreciate true feelings, teen angst, self doubt and relationships with parents portrayed in this film.
A group of kids sitting for 8 hours in detention on a Saturday none of them will ever forget. While there is foul language, it's about the same speed as what you can hear on "NYPD Blue" on TV. There is no nudity or sex, just raw, in your face teen angst.
You see this group of "losers," warts and all, and become friends with all of them before the film is over. The DVD doesn't offer anything other than cast bios and subtitles... which is a disappointment. It would have been great to have had some interviews with the cast and behind the scenes footage. Nonetheless, DVD is much better than tape and definitely worth the extra $ for a non volitile format.
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on May 14, 2005
"The Breakfast Club" is one of the finest representations of emotion portrayed through images and music that I have ever seen. Five people from completely different angles are able to break down the walls of popularity, prejudice, and judgment, and come together as friends. If all films were made like this, the world would be in better condition than it is today.
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on December 5, 2001
This movie is a classic and it will stand the test of time. This is the second "teen coming of age" installment from John Hues, and round 2 for Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall. The first installment, Sixteen Candles, was more of a sexual coming of age movie whereas The Breakfast Club is more of a coming of age for one's character and social awareness. Where they are "teetering" with; staying with their social allegiances to their perspective pack, or do they listen to that inner voice...the voice of reason, maturity and human compassion that's not bound to any "click". I like the choice of actors; I think they all fit like pieces in a puzzle and make their characters totally believable. I am in the same age range as almost the entire cast and I was a senior in High school when this film came out. Allot of reviews seem to put this film within the Junior High crowd but I feel it's much more mature than that. The very message that it's trying to get across isn't understood in real life until we get close to 18 or so. The story is simple; 5 kids have to come into school on a Saturday for detention. At first they try to segregate themselves according to their school social standings. Inevitably they find out that they are more alike than they ever thought. The movie, in my eyes, is broken into 3 parts; the first part is pure character development. This is where you (the viewer) gets to know each person they way they are supposed to be seen with their everyday face. At first, they act the way they think they should act, and stand up for what they always had, with out question or defiance. They stay true to their cause never steering away for a second. The second part of the film is where the movie itself develops. These 5 separate entities realize that they are variations of the same person. They have the same desires and anguishes. Their pressures and stresses are the same even though it's generated from very different sources.
The jock (Emilio Estevez) has the pressure to be on top of his sport (wrestling). In return for this he gets attention from his dad, coaches and keeps his standing within his social group. This is his priority in life and he doesn't stray.
The Princess (Molly Ringwald) has to conform and obey the rules of her social group in order to be accepted and keep her standing within the group. She keeps her eyes closed; mouth shut and goes along for the ride.
The Metal Head/criminal (Judd Nelson) is an angry guy! He wears the physical and mental scars of growing up in an abusive house. He hates most people, like the ones Emilio and Molly play, because in his eyes, they have had a free ticket and earned nothing...things are handed to them because of their social and/or economical standings. On the other hand, he feels that he's on a whole other plain because his eyes have been beaten open and he was forced to grow up a little faster than he wanted too or was ready too. I feel that Judd Nelson's character is the most crucial to the movie. He is the key to this whole new self-awareness for everyone, including himself.
The nerd (Anthony Michael Hall) is the quintessential geek. His every woken moment is spent learning. He hides behind his grades and in fact, he wants to be more accepted by the "cooler" groups. He also is a little "cocky" about his better grades and academically superiority to the other people in the room.
The weirdo (Ally Sheedy) is a loner and an outcast. She doesn't have friends that we (the viewers) know of. Because her parents ignore her, She feels ugly and without a place in the world. She is starving for positive attention. I think her character was needed in this movie to balance off the cast. It would have left out a very critical part of teen angst!
Richard Vernon (Paul Gleason) is the "Villain" of the movie. To the kids, he represents the out of touch older generation and the mean spirited, high testosterone adult. For Richard Vernon, these kids are the source of his anger and agony. He has lost touch with the younger generation for 1 reason, he got older...and the older you get, the harder it is to relate to youth. Youth recycles right before your eyes, but you keep getting older. His character is the key that releases these kids. He helps them to strip away the blindfolds and to take a fresh look at every thing and everyone (including themselves).
This leads to the 3rd and final part of the movie. Where they cleanse themselves of all the pentad up anger and prejudices, where they experience a sort of rebirth. When the kids realize that they all have the same goal, they were just taking different roads to reach it. I also like the fact that Anthony Michael Hall's character, the nerd, has the last word and Judd Nelson's character, the criminal, gets the last scene. I think it was poignant that the 2 groups that are pushed the furthest down the social ladder get to close out the movie and punctuate the message that is being given' to a person that represents the source of their anguish. I highly recommend The Breakfast Club and it should go down as one of the all time great teenage movie!
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on October 4, 1999
I have seen this movie 8 times, and I still love it. Who hasn't dreamed of being stuck with four freaky people on a Saturday morning and smoking pot? Okay, maybe you haven't, but if you loved "Sixteen Candles" and "Pretty in Pink", you will love this movie, GUARANTEED. You can hunt me down if you don't. Judd Nelson as Bender is positively scary, and Ally Sheedy is her best ever -- except, perhaps, for the recent "High Art". What really makes this movie great, though, is its accurate portrayal (or close approximation anyway) of high school life. Having been in Anthony Michael Hall's shoes until a very short time ago, I can totally relate. The only difference is that at the end of "The Breakfast Club" you actually believe they will all stay friends, while in real life that doesn't happen. Still, this movie remains a cult classic (who can forget the dancing scene in the library?) and should be seen by 80's devotees and film students alike.
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on June 20, 2001
This movie is probably my favorite of all time. I own the VHS edition and the DVD. The story revolves around 5 high school students who are forced to spend Saturday detention together. Judd Nelson plays the criminal, Emilio Estevez is the jock, Molly Ringwald is the princess, Anthony Michael Hall is the brain, and Ally Sheedy plays the basketcase. At the beginning of the movie they are total strangers with nothing in common, and by the end of the movie they each have bared their souls to each other and have become good friends. This is a great dramatic comedy that is a can't miss for anyone who loves great movies. These five actors have incredible chemistry, and this movie is an excellent showcase of their individual and collective talents. Each actor gives a gripping performance especially Judd Nelson who is outstanding in his role as the criminal. Directed by John Hughes, who also produced such classics as "Ferris Bueller's Day Off", "Sixteen Candles", and "Weird Science". "The Breakfast Club" is truly one of the "new classics" that never gets old. If you have never seen this movie, you absolutely owe it to yourself to watch it. Get this one and get ready to run with the "Brat Pack"!
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on November 28, 2001
This movie is a classic and it will stand the test of time. This is the second "teen coming of age" installment from John Hues, and round 2 for Molly Ringwald and Anthony Michael Hall. The first installment, Sixteen Candles, was more of a sexual coming of age movie whereas The Breakfast Club is more of a coming of age for one's character and social awareness. Where they are "teetering" with; do they stay with the social allegiances of their perspective pack, or do they listen to that inner voice...the voice of reason, maturity and human compassion that's not bound to any "click". I also like the choice of actors here; I think they all fit like pieces in a puzzle and make their characters totally believable. I am in the same age range as almost the entire cast and I was a senior in High school when this film came out. Allot of reviews seem to put this film within the Junior High crowd but I feel it's much more mature than that. The very message that it's trying to get across isn't understood in real life until we get close to 18 or so. The story is simple; 5 kids have to come into school on a Saturday for detention. At first they try to segregate themselves according to their school social standings. Inevitably they find out that they are more alike than they ever thought. The movie, in my eyes, is broken into 3 parts; the first part is pure character development. This is where you (the viewer) get to know each person they way they are supposed to be seen with their everyday face. At first, they act the way they think they should act, and stand up for what they always had, with out question or defiance. They stay true to their cause never steering away for a second. The second part of the film is where the movie itself develops. These 5 separate entities realize that they are variations of the same person. They have the same desires and anguishes. Their pressures and stresses are the same even though it's generated from very different sources.
The jock (Emilio Estevez) has the pressure to be on top of his sport (wrestling). In return for this he gets attention from his dad, coaches and keeps his standing within his social group. This is his priority in life and he doesn't stray.
The Princess (Molly Ringwald) has to conform and obey the rules of her social group in order to be accepted and keep her standing within the group. She keeps her eyes closed; mouth shut and goes along for the ride.
The Metal Head/criminal (Judd Nelson) is an angry guy! He wears the physical and mental scars of growing up in an abusive house. He hates most people, like the ones Emilio and Molly play, because in his eyes, they have had a free ticket and earned nothing...things are handed to them because of their social and/or economical standings. On the other hand, he feels that he's on a whole other plain because his eyes have been beaten open and he was forced to grow up a little faster than he wanted too or was ready too. I feel that Judd Nelson's character is the most crucial to the movie. He is the key to this whole new self-awareness for everyone, including himself.
The nerd (Anthony Michael Hall) is the quintessential geek. His every woken moment is spent learning. He hides behind his grades and in fact, he wants to be more accepted by the "cooler" groups. He also is a little "cocky" about his better grades and academically superiority to the other people in the room.
The weirdo (Ally Sheedy) is a loner and an outcast. She doesn't have friends that we (the viewers) know of. Because her parents ignore her, She feels ugly and without a place in the world. She is starving for positive attention. I think her character was needed in this movie to balance off the cast. It would have left out a very critical part of teen angst!
Richard Vernon (Paul Gleason) is the "Villain" of the movie. To the kids, he represents the out of touch older generation and the mean spirited, high testosterone adult. For Richard Vernon, these kids are the source of his anger and agony. He has lost touch with the younger generation for 1 reason, he got older...and the older you get, the harder it is to relate to youth. Youth recycles right before your eyes, but you keep getting older. His character is the key that releases these kids. He helps them to strip away the blindfolds and to take a fresh look at every thing and everyone (including themselves).
This leads to the 3rd and final part of the movie. Where they cleanse themselves of all the pentad up anger and prejudices. When the kids realize that they all have the same goal, they were just taking different roads to reach it. I highly recommend The Breakfast Club and it should go down as one of the all time great teenage movie!
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on May 27, 2008
A new release of The Breakfast Club is coming out in September with an audio commentary by Judd Nelson and Anthony Michael Hall, a couple features called "Sincerely Yours" and "Most Convenient Definitions: The Origins of the Brat Pack," and the theatrical trailer. These will be the first real special features to have been included with The Breakfast Club on DVD. It's known that there are deleted scenes (some have been shown on TV), but there was no mention of any in the announcement for the new DVD.

The Breakfast Club is considered by many the quintessential high school movie, which is quite a comment on high school, as almost the entire film takes place in detention. Five students, each representing a type but fleshed out into real characters as the film develops, are stuck together on a Saturday in detention. In terms they use themselves, there's a "criminal" (Judd Nelson), a "princess" (Molly Ringwald), a "jock" (Emilio Estevez), a "brain" (Anthony Michael Hall), and a "basket case" (Ally Sheedy). Effectively portrayed tension between the five builds to explosive levels before they finally discover how much they have in common. There is a lot of sharp humor, some hijinks, a lot of emotional release in the last third. The acting is very good. Nelson is especially good as the main catalyst for the tension, projecting a powerful personality and sharp mind turned in against self and back out at others.

I loved this movie in the '80s. I still like it and admire it now, though its formula seems a little more prominent to me than it used to. By today's standards it may seem to pull its punches when it comes to the reasons kids have to be unhappy and in trouble, but it strikes a fair balance between entertaining teen comedy and realism. It's also a fine time capsule from the '80s.

The new DVD will be 1.85:1 anamorphic widescreen with English Dolby Digital 5.1 and English DTS 5.1. No indication has been given that this will be any different from the older DVDs.

New Flashback Editions of two other John Hughes classics, Sixteen Candles and Weird Science, are slated to come out on the same day as this one. Each will include a feature about the film. Weird Science will also have the Weird Science TV series pilot episode and the theatrical trailer. Apparently only this one gets an audio commentary. No Blu-ray announcements yet.

Amazon has a page to pre-order here.
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