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Breaking Bread in Galilee: A Culinary Journey into the Promised Land Paperback – April 18, 2012


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Product Details

  • Paperback: 260 pages
  • Publisher: Hilayon Press (April 18, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9657594006
  • ISBN-13: 978-9657594001
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.6 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 13.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #2,106,278 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Abbie Rosner is a Washington DC native who has lived in the Galilee since the late 1980s. She has published articles on the multi-cultural culinary landscape of the Galilee in Gastronomica, Wine Spectator and Lilith magazines. She also leads Culinary Tours of the Galilee, which she created to offer visitors a unique and memorable experience of this region, through encounters with local foods and the people who prepare them. Abbie also writes a blog, Galilee Seasonality, documenting her local food experiences.

More About the Author

Abbie Rosner researches and writes about the multicultural culinary landscape of the Galilee. Specifically, she is interested in identifying ancient foodways as they are practiced today, particularly in the rural Arab communities in the Galilee. A dedicated forager, Abbie is committed to using dialogue over food as a means to establish communication and trust over the Jewish-Arab divide.

Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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Ms. Rosner's brings the Galilee alive on every page.
Beth Banks Cohn
Great to read through from beginning to end and then to dip back into to re-read specific parts.
BookWormNZ
Excellent source of biblical references linked to today's agriculture in the middle east.
bernice schmid

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Beth Banks Cohn on May 15, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I visit the Galilee almost every year, yet Breaking Bread in Galilee helped me see it as if for the first time. Abbie Rosner's love of the land, and her passion for understanding the ancient ways comes through on every page. This book is a travelogue to places most people will never get a chance to visit. There is great value in that. Although Ms. Rosner's never says it explicitly, even the order of her book mirrors the seasons in Israel. If you appreciate agricultural history, this is a book you will surely enjoy. Ms. Rosner's brings the Galilee alive on every page. A must read for lovers of Israel, food and the Bible.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Steven on April 26, 2012
Format: Paperback
BREAKING BREAD IN GALILEE is, all at once, a travelogue, a lesson in history, a celebration of food, an archaeological journey, and a political manifesto. The combination of Rosner's covert and overt subject matters, her mature, poised tone (which alternates between the ecstatic and the mournful), and the lapidary nature of many of her sentences caused me to read slowly and carefully, savoring every nuance. In that way, Rosner's prose reproduces for the attentive reader the experience she evokes again and again--not only of the mindful preparation and eating of food but of the prayerful approach of one human to another. There is a timeless meditative quality to the mood Rosner's book produces in the reader, and I found it enlivening, relaxing, nourishing, both tremendously sad and exalting. (Full disclosure: I read the book in manuscript and suggested a few line-edits.)
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By BookWormNZ on May 29, 2012
Format: Paperback
Reading "Breaking Bread in Galilee" by Abbie Rosner is an immersive experience. Each page was a discovery of joy and passion. While the book is ostensibly about food, it's also about people, and history, and ways of life and of interacting with others and with the agricultural and natural environment. As beautifully written, deeply researched and well-organized as the book is, the overall effect is of a very natural journey of discovery -- of fast-disappearing foods and traditions, as well as of new friends. Rosner's curiosity and openness to learn more about and get to know her Arab and Druze neighbors creates a framework for readers to do the same. This book is easy to read and informative. While it is written in the first-person and Rosner's personality comes through clearly, it is not about HER, but about the people she meets and the things she learns and experiences. I felt like I was sharing those experiences and getting to know those people personally. Great to read through from beginning to end and then to dip back into to re-read specific parts.
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Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent source of biblical references linked to today's agriculture in the middle east.
Shows how people working together can overcome pressures brought upon them by outside sources.
Very readable. Excellent recipes.
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1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Anna on April 27, 2014
Format: Paperback
Rosner's romp through the Galilee is fun on the culinary front -- if you want to know the difference between freeka and burgul, for example, or understand more about how the traditional local diet mirrors the growing seasons, you'll love this book. The chapters are short essays relating Rosner's encounters and adventures with various locals, and the anecdotes are vivid, well-told and informative (although the endings are sometimes a little too pat).

Two caveats:

1. Sorely missing are photographs. The one on the cover is tantalizing and whets the appetite for more. What does wild asparagus look like anyway? How about the tabun she built? Her friend's famous cookies? The ancient olive and wine presses she describes?

2. Rosner's thesis, which she hammers at unceasingly, that if Jews and Arabs would just sit down and eat together, all difficulties would be resolved is both naive and disingenuous. Her strong tendency to romanticize the agrarian Arabs she meets makes for a happy but sadly misleading story. Several examples, although there are many more:

a) She mentions a memorial in one Arab village to residents killed from the early 20th century through to the Second Intifada, without ever mentioning the thousands of Jewish citizens deliberately targeted by Arab terrorists as part of said intifada. It's akin to bemoaning the post 9/11 difficulty of some Muslims in passing through airport security without ever mentioning why they were having that difficulty.

b) She refers to the scourge of agricultural theft without mentioning that it's a one-way street. Hint: the Jews are not the ones doing the stealing. Since her husband is a police officer in the district, there's no way she doesn't know this.
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