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Brian's Return Mass Market Paperback – May 8, 2001


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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Mass Market Paperback: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Laurel Leaf; Reprint edition (May 8, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0440413796
  • ISBN-13: 978-0440413790
  • Product Dimensions: 6.8 x 4.2 x 0.4 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (156 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #556,190 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com Review

A deer in his canoe, a bear attack, a leg stabbed with an arrowhead--it's just another week in the life of 16-year-old Brian Robeson. In his opinion, this beats a date at Mackey's Pizza Den, a fight with a bully, and a video game at the mall any day. After having survived a plane crash and 54 days in the Canadian wilderness several years earlier, Brian can't seem to fit into "civilization." The world of high school and family life makes no sense anymore. So Brian begins to plan. It's time to return to the woods. This time, though, he makes no plans to come back home.

Gary Paulsen, the popular author of many critically acclaimed books for young people and winner of the 1997 Margaret A. Edward Award, has written another sequel to the Newbery Honor Book Hatchet. (The River and Brian's Winter were earlier sequels.) Paulsen's graphic and detailed descriptions of Brian's adventures demonstrate a deep familiarity and connection to the wilderness; and in fact the author has spent much of his life in the bush, living almost entirely off the land. Brian's experiences in nature parallel his growing independence and maturity; readers who don't feel like they "fit in" will easily relate to the young protagonist's search for identity and purity. (Ages 11 and older) --Emilie Coulter --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

From Publishers Weekly

The appearance of yet another sequel to Hatchet may raise a few eyebrows, but Paulsen delivers a vigorous, stirring story that stands on its own merits. Whereas the previous continuations, The River and Brian's Winter, essentially offer more of the same survivalist thrills that have made Hatchet so popular, this novel goes further, posing a more profound question: How does someone go from living on the edge to polite membership in ordinary society? (Paulsen addresses the same theme, albeit more grimly, in his Civil War novel Soldier's Heart.) Here, Brian has returned to his mother's house and can barely reconcile the seemingly arbitrary demands of high school with the life-or-death challenges he surmounted during his months alone in the wilderness. With the aid of a counselor, Brian formulates what had been an almost instinctual, unacknowledged plan to revisit the bush, and this solo trip, not his interlude with his mother, marks the true "return" of the title. The few cliff-hangers are almost beside the point: the great adventure here is the embrace of the wild, the knowledge of life at its most elemental. Aside from its occasional use of YA conventions (e.g., the preternaturally sensitive counselor; jejune rhapsodies over the relevance of Shakespeare), this work is bold, confident and persuasive, its transcendental themes powerfully seductive. Ages 12-up.
Copyright 1998 Reed Business Information, Inc. --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

More About the Author

Gary Paulsen is one of the most honored writers of contemporary literature for young readers. He has written more than one hundred book for adults and young readers, and is the author of three Newberry Honor titles: Dogsong, Hatchet, and The Winter Room. He divides his time among Alaska, New Mexico, Minnesota, and the Pacific.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

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#58 in Books > Teens
#58 in Books > Teens

Customer Reviews

I loved this book it was very pages turning.
dr huston
Overall, the book is Great and I recommend it to everyone who loves the outdoors.
Pace
It is part of a series so read the other books first.
Jenny Carey

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

19 of 21 people found the following review helpful By Robert W. Kalteux on May 17, 2001
Format: Hardcover
Brian's Return, by Gary Paulsen, is an adventure/survival book about Brian's long-awaited return to the Canadian woods written by Paulsen, a three time Newberry Honor award winner. The story begins with Brian, a 16 year old boy trying to live a normal life. The hard part for him is, he spent 48 days in the Canadian woods after his pilot had a heart attack and it changed his perspective on life. He can't find joy in having his food put right in front of him, or talking about who was going out with whom. After beating up a football player, he sees a counselor named Caleb. Caleb listens to his beautiful descriptions, and tells Brian that the answer was to go back up into the wilderness. He creates a list and a plan for a hundred mile kayak trip to eventually visit the Smallhorns, who rescued him in Brian's Winter. Brian goes through yet another action packed wilderness experience in Brian's Return. This book would be a little hard for young kids to find the true meaning of, so ages 11 and up would be a good reccomended age. Anyone who enjoyed Hatchet and its other sequels will enjoy this book.
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26 of 30 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 5, 1999
Format: Hardcover
I think Brian's Return is a great book. If you have read Hatchet, The River, and Brian's Winter (like I have) then you will understand the story better 'cause you probably wouldn't really understand it if you haven't read at least one of those three books that came before this one. This time, Brian is back at home and he can't seem to adjust to his formal life at home. After he gets into a huge fight with this kid who is jelous of him and gets arrested for it, he decides that the best place for him is back in the woods and so he goes back there. This time, Brian is prepared and he is used to the way the woods is so he can survive. I think this book is awesome and if you have read Hatchet, The River, and Brian's Winter and liked those books, then I can gaurentee that you will like Brian's Return! Even if you haven't read those books but have read other books by Gary Paulsen then you should get this book!
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on July 15, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Brian's Return is the third and final sequel to Gary Paulsen's 1988 Newbery Honor book Hatchet. In this sequel Brian is an unhappy 15 year old high school student who is having great difficulty adjusting to a normal "civilized" life after being alone in the wilderness. For almost two years he tries to fit in but he just can't seem to connect with his old friends and their seemingly trivial concerns. Through conversations with a counselor Brian realizes that he must return to the wilderness to find himself and his place in the world. This book chronicles his canoe trip back into the wild. Paulsen's desciptions of the scenery and wildlife are so vivid and realistic that readers will feel they are on the trip with Brian. If you have read Hatchet, The River, and Brian's Winter, you MUST read Brian's Return. Although it is a little more reflective than the other action packed books, it is still a fitting conclusion to Brian's saga. I highly recommend Brian's Return.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 22, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
The book Brian's Return is a very good book. It's interesting and no matter where you stop reading you can tell something good is coming up next. It's not a high reading level so it's easier to understand. The author explains every thing throw and it's not really at a high reading level.
Brian's Return is the last book in a series. The first book was called Hatchet, second was The River, third was Brian's Winter, and then Brian's Return.
Hatchet was about when it all started. Brian was flying on a single engine plane to see his dad up North. The pilot had a heart attack and the plane went down in a lake in the middle of the wilderness. He had to learn how to survive alone in the wilderness with only a hatchet for fifty-four days.
In The River, the government asked Brian to go back to the wilderness and show astronauts and the military his survival techniques that kept him alive. Derek Holtzer went with him to observe him and take notes. But during a storm, Derek was hit by lightning and falls into a coma. Brian builds a raft a tries to transport Derek to the nearest town down the river for medical help.
Brian's Winter is a little different, it takes after Hatchet. The author made it that what if Brian didn't get rescued and had to make it through the winter. The stakes were raised for survival. Brian had the longest winter ever.
Finally, Brian's Return. Brian was rescued every time before and brought back to his mom in the city. After everything Brian has gone through he has to try to fit back in with the city life. He had to get used to the tv, stove, microwave, grocery store, noisy vehicles, and everything else that he had learned to live with out. He started school again and tried to make friends and hang out, but he doesn't feel that he fits in.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on January 7, 2001
Format: Hardcover
This book was about a boy named Brian who stayed in the wilderness for awhile and went to the city with his mother. He didn't like it in the city. One of the days he was in the city he got into a fight and got put with a counselor to fix his problem. After awhile he went back to the woods because he didn't like it in the city and because he wanted to go back. He thought that he would behave better in the wilderness rather then the city. He took a cab to a cabin of a pilot and then took a plane to a river. From there he took a canoe to find a campsite. Along the way he got into many more adventures. I really liked this book and would recommend this book to anyone who likes adventures. Also to someone who has already read the other books by Gary Paulsen.
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