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Brian's Winter Hardcover – January 1, 1996


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Brian's Winter + The River + Brian's Return
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Product Details

  • Age Range: 12 and up
  • Grade Level: 7 and up
  • Hardcover: 144 pages
  • Publisher: Delacorte Books for Young Readers; Feb-96 edition (January 1, 1996)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0385321988
  • ISBN-13: 978-0385321983
  • Product Dimensions: 5.9 x 0.6 x 8.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 8.8 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.3 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (519 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #55,487 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From Publishers Weekly

First there was Hatchet, Paulsen's classic tale of a boy's survival in the north woods after a plane crash. Then came a sequel, The River, and, last year, Father Water, Mother Woods, a collection of autobiographical essays introduced as the nonfiction counterpart to Hatchet. Now Paulsen backs up and asks readers to imagine that Brian, the hero, hadn't been rescued after all. His many fans will be only too glad to comply, revisiting Brian at the onset of a punishing Canadian winter. The pace never relents-the story begins, as it were, in the middle, with Brian already toughened up and his reflexes primed for crisis. Paulsen serves up one cliffhanger after another (a marauding bear, a charging elk), and always there are the supreme challenges of obtaining food and protection against the cold. Authoritative narration makes it easy for readers to join Brian vicariously as he wields his hatchet to whittle arrows and arrowheads and a lance, hunts game, and devises clothes out of animal skins; while teasers at the ends of chapters keep the tension high ("He would hunt big tomorrow, he thought.... But as it happened he very nearly never hunted again"). The moral of the story: it pays to write your favorite author and ask for another helping. Ages 12-up.
Copyright 1995 Reed Business Information, Inc.

From School Library Journal

Grade 5-9-At the conclusion of Hatchet (Macmillan, 1987), Brian Robeson is rescued after surviving a plane crash and summer alone in the north Canadian woods. Now, in this second sequel, Paulsen shows what would have happened if the 13-year-old boy had been forced to endure the harsh winter. For a brief time, Brian lives in relative luxury, living off the contents of the recently recovered survival pack, which included a gun for hunting. Then, his freeze-dried food runs out and his rifle fails, and he realizes how careless and complacent he has become. Suddenly aware of the changing seasons, he works frantically to winterize his shelter, fashion warmer clothes from animal skins, and construct a more powerful bow and arrow. About the time he has mastered winter survival, he discovers a dog-sled trail that leads him to a trapper and final rescue. The same formula that worked before is successful here: the driving pace of the narration, the breathtaking descriptions of nature, and the boy who triumphs on the merits of efficient problem solving. The author's ability to cast a spell, mesmerize his audience, and provide a clinic in winter survival is reason enough to buy this novel. Although the plot is both familiar and predictable, Paulsen fans will not be disappointed.?Tim Rausch, Crescent View Middle School, Sandy, UT
Copyright 1996 Reed Business Information, Inc.

More About the Author

Gary Paulsen is one of the most honored writers of contemporary literature for young readers. He has written more than one hundred book for adults and young readers, and is the author of three Newberry Honor titles: Dogsong, Hatchet, and The Winter Room. He divides his time among Alaska, New Mexico, Minnesota, and the Pacific.

Amazon Author Rankbeta 

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#38 in Books > Teens
#38 in Books > Teens

Customer Reviews

This is a great book for enjoyment reading.
Adam Kinnunen
This is the story of what Brian learns and does to survive in the winter.
Jane
The author of this book described the stories very well.
jacob revor

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

29 of 32 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on January 15, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
I first heard about Brian's Winter when my teacher gave every student a copy the day before winter break. I am not a very bookish person, so I only read books that I tremendously like from the first chapter. This book was one of the rare books that captivated me on the first page. Without warning, Brian was involved in a horrible plane crash. He sustained no injuries, and afterwards he also survived on the isolated lake grounds for a very long time. I was very interested in all of Brian's weapons, his Native American ways of survival, and his hunting skills. I had tried reading Hatchet but it didn't really interest me. A good strategy to get yourself reading more is to read the second book in a series to get all the excitment right away, then read the first in the series. I was really impressed by Brian's way of survival in the wilderness. It was very suspenseful and exciting when Brian had to put up somewhat of a fight against some of his larger prey. I just couldn't put the book down. I admired Brian's way of life so much, that now one of my favorite things to do is to hunt rabbits and set traps for birds. In conclusion, Brian's Winter was filled with excitement, suspense, and emotion.
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12 of 13 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 16, 2006
Format: Mass Market Paperback
In 6th grade i read the book before this and i thought wow that was ok. Then i was on a dry streak and never read a book for a year or two and i saw this book in my closet and remembered i read the one before this one. I beleive this book got me reading again and I suggest you get this book immediately because it draws you in and it makes you want to read more and more. I read this last week and after this i read all the other ones in the next week it was amazing and I hope you find this helpful.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on November 15, 2001
Format: Mass Market Paperback
Have you ever been stranded in the middle of nowhere, in the winter? Brains was stranded for more than 54 days, and no one had found him yet, so Brian knew now that he is going to be there for a while. Brian is worried, he has only some food and he knows that it will only last for some of the time. Well Brian didn't want that to happen, so he got out his hunting tools and went hunting. He got some more food for the winter, and then he was all set. He had a sleeping bag, pots, pans, silverware, matches to start fires, and of course food. I wonder if Brian will survive. Ladies and gentlemen I invite and encourage you to read the book "Brian's Winter, By: Gary Paulsen".
One thing I dislike about the book was when; he found out in the beginning that he wasn't going to be found for a while. Then he thought on how it was going to be winter very soon! If I was he I would be worried too just like him. Something I liked about the book was at the end when he was found. A lot of times when I read books I am always anxious to see what is going to happen in the book, how it is going to end up. When I was reading "Brian's Winter" I was so anxious to see what was going to happen. All of these events were happening and it was really exciting for me to read this book.
I would describe Brian, different than other people. Brian is determined, courageous, and smart. He is determined because he has a goal to live through this winter and he is determined to meet his goal. Also Brian is courageous. He has lived this long out there, and hasn't given up by being scared or any thing. Finally he is also smart. In the book "Hatchet" (the book before "Brian's Winter") he was smart when he was stranded there he didn't know how to start a fire. He tried rubbing sticks together; rocks together, and it wouldn't work.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on February 17, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Imagine being stranded in a forest after a plane crash with just a hatchet, nature, and no one to help you! In the extraodinary and suspenseful survival book, Brian's Winter, a 13 year old boy named Brian Robeson has to survive in the threatening wilderness during the winter alone. Brian has to use his head and his skill to hunt for his food as well as produce his own weapons and living quarters. With bear attacks and frost-biting temperatures. Will Brian survive? Will he ever find civilization? If you like stories about the wilderness, with lots of suspense, adventure, and vivid language, Brian's Winter is the book for you. on a rating from 1-10, we would give this book an 8. Appropriate for grades late 4th to 6th.
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6 of 7 people found the following review helpful A Kid's Review on February 20, 2007
Format: Paperback
The book Brian's Winter has to be one of the best books that I have read in a long time. I am not the biggest fan of Gary Paulsen but, this book made me feel like I was actually at the camp he built and could hear all the sounds of nature.

When Brian Robeson's plane crashed, he was stranded in the northern Canadian Woods. Since the pilot of the plane died, Brian was on his own. After surviving the summer, he found a survival kit with food, water, a rifle and other essentials for surviving. Unfortunately, the rifle was broken after so many uses. He had to settle for the bow he made.

Brian had lost track of the days and didn't realize that winter was coming! The sign in which he realized winter would arrive soon is that cold rain poured for days. He began to worry and his food supply was low. To his luck, he saw wolves coming back from the woods with food in their mouths. He went to the area where they came from and found a half eaten doe lying out in the open. Brian needed food so he carried the doe back to camp.

As the days went by, the air became very cold. His doe meat was running low. He knew that he needed a larger animal to survive. Brian's old bow would not be able to kill large animals. So he made a larger bow with larger arrows. Brian also made a lance when he needed the extra boost. When he went out hunting, he came across a moose. The moose was enormous! Brian shot his large bow and hit the mark, but it didn't kill the moose. The moose charged, but Brian used the lance and stabbed it. After taking the moose back to camp, he realized his tattered and torn clothes would not suffice. So he made a jacket out of fur from the deer and rabbit fur. He also made moccasins out of the same material.
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