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Bride of the Wind


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Product Details

  • Actors: Sarah Wynter, Jonathan Pryce, Vincent Perez, Simon Verhoeven, Gregor Seberg
  • Directors: Bruce Beresford
  • Format: Anamorphic, Closed-captioned, Color, Dolby, Subtitled, Widescreen, NTSC
  • Language: English (Dolby Digital 2.0 Surround), English (Dolby Digital 5.1)
  • Subtitles: English
  • Dubbed: English
  • Region: Region 1 (U.S. and Canada only. Read more about DVD formats.)
  • Aspect Ratio: 1.85:1
  • Number of discs: 1
  • Rated: R (Restricted)
  • Studio: Paramount
  • DVD Release Date: November 13, 2001
  • Run Time: 99 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 3.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • ASIN: B00005Q2YS
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #200,536 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)
  • Learn more about "Bride of the Wind" on IMDb

Special Features

None.

Editorial Reviews

Product Description

From acclaimed director Bruce Beresford ("Driving Miss Daisy", "Double Jeopardy") comes the sensual, epic saga of a woman for whom genius was the ultimate aphrodisiac. Jonathan Pryce ("Tomorrow Never Dies"), Vincent Perez ("The Crow: City of Angels") and

From the Back Cover

From acclaimed director Bruce Beresford ("Driving Miss Daisy", "Double Jeopardy") comes the sensual, epic saga of a woman for whom genius was the ultimate aphrodisiac. Jonathan Pryce ("Tomorrow Never Dies"), Vincent Perez ("The Crow: City of Angels") and sexy newcomer Sarah Wynter ("The Sixth Day") star in this true story of untamed passion and inspiration. Like moths to a flame, the greatest talents of turn-of-the-century Europe were drawn to Alma, a remarkable muse who ignited desire that would translate into masterpieces of art, music and literature. What drove "the most beautiful woman in Vienna" to inspire the hearts and minds of composer Gustav Mahler (Pryce), painter Oskar Kokoschka (Perez), architect Walter Gropius and novelist Franz Werfel? Give yourself over to this tale of creativity and seduction, of art and love, and of the sacrifices one extraordinary woman - a century ahead of her time - made in her attempt to have it all.

Customer Reviews

What I do miss, perhaps, are some 'the making of...'scenes, but no matter.
B. Van der Walt
And in the center of all this ennui plods Sarah Wynter, a pretty, unremarkable Australian actress, giving a pretty unremarkable performance here as Alma.
Randy Buck
Yet a kind of dusty solemnity continues to hang over the proceedings, aided by the beautiful but underlit settings and some very pedestrian dialogue.
Lawrence A. Schenbeck

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

37 of 40 people found the following review helpful By Paul B. Rucker on December 1, 2001
Format: VHS Tape
I was lucky enough to see this movie during the one week it spent here in New Orleans, and I knew to look for it because six months earlier a fellow art/music/film/eccentric lifestyles maven had alerted me to it.
What I know about the life of Alma, I know from the film, so I cannot judge its veracity with historical accuracy-- although I am familiar with all of her lovers and husbands' work. I thought it was thoroughly enchanting-- here is why:
It is set in one of my favorite periods of European history, the fin-du-siecle up to post WWI, and the costumes and settings alone are truly gorgeous. Gustave Klimt makes an extended supporting appearance here; the immersion of the intelligentsia and high society in the aesthetic and cultural ideas of each period are ubiquitous. The art direction and research were masterfully undertaken; the light that appears in this film, both outdoor and indoor, contributes effectively in every scene. It is rare indeed that I am so aware of the light itself in a film as a primary "actor". From scenes set in elegant halls, to a sanatorium, to boulevards, to Oscar Kokoschka's wonderful studio, the sets alone inspire my admiration.
But of course that is not enough to sustain a movie-- the story here is a basic one: Alma Mahler was a woman of intelligence and artistic gifts who was continually put in the position of aesthetic concubinage because of her beauty and skill at the "feminine" role. The notion of a woman being needed to be "The Muse', the inspiratrix of Art, has not only been historically popular with (male) artists but has by definition precluded the active expression of said woman's talents.
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19 of 19 people found the following review helpful By Samhot on June 27, 2003
Format: DVD
I stumbled upon this film knowing that it was based on Alma Mahler, the woman who was married to classical composer Gustav Mahler. Since Mahler is a huge fascination of mine, I was compelled to watch this film. While Gustav Mahler seemed to be the central focus of the story in the first half, Alma Mahler gets more of the spotlight during the second, which makes this seem like two different films.
Like another reviewer stated, if you're a history/research buff, you may notice some loopholes or inaccuracies within the story. However, I'm guessing that this wasn't really intended to be epic material. Other than that, the film is quite artistic, beautiful and seductive. In the first half of the movie, it was nice to see Mahler (played by Jonathan Pryce) conducting parts of his 5th symphony, and some of his other pieces, while gaining a little bit of insight into the personality and thought-processes of the composer, however accurate they were. Some of those scenes were painful to watch (especially when Mahler found out he had heart problems, and he was going to die.) Elsewhere, like the critic said on the page, Sarah Wynter as Alma, had a seductive air about her, as she portrays a woman with talent, lust, passion and heartache. Some of the love scenes in here were quite steamy as well.
Overall, if you have interest in Gustav Mahler, Alma Mahler or any of the other historical figures involved in the story, I'd recommend that you view this. Despite not being the most serious or epic of documentaries, there's more than enough ear and eye candy to keep you fascinated.
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15 of 15 people found the following review helpful By S. A. Felton on December 8, 2002
Format: VHS Tape
I am writing this review to balance the incredibly negative reviews
I have read about "Bride of the Wind." I read the reviews before and
after seeing the movie, and I am aghast at what I've read - reviewers
who happily give 4 (out of 4) stars to (I won't say it) like "Breaking the
Waves" and "Signs" give this 1/2 star. Or how about "Fargo" and "The Big
Lebowski?" I think it's a travesty, and I wonder if there isn't some agenda
that big-budget movies with top stars have to be reviewed favorably for the
reviewer to be "in," while a movie like this can be trashed so unfairly. "Bride
of the Wind" deserves more merit than most movies if for no other reason than
it attempts to seriously portray the life of one of the 20th century's finest
(opera) conductors/composers, though here obviously focusing on his talented,
beautiful, outspoken, sometimes even callous wife, who indeed has numerous
affairs before, during (!), and after his death. Clearly the moviemakers focus
on Alma because she outlives Mahler by more than 50 years, and has a more
"racey" life.
I've been a fan of Mahler's symphonies for years, and I felt that the
producers of "Bride of the Wind" correctly chose to focus the bulk of the
movie on Mahler and Alma. I found the performances of the actors who played
the great composer and his wife more than acceptable, though not for a moment
would I call them "perfect." I was pleased with the selection of some of Mahler's
symphonies and songs (though the musician who recommended the movie to me said
that the conducting sequences were very poor!).
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