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Bridges to Babylon


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Audio CD, September 30, 1997
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$12.95 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by premiervideogames and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.

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Bridges to Babylon + A Bigger Bang + Voodoo Lounge [Reissue]
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Editorial Reviews

Rolling Stones Bridges To Babylon UK CD album

1. Flip The Switch
2. Anybody Seen My Baby?
3. Low Down
4. Already Over Me
5. Gun Pace
6. You Don't Have To Mean It
7. Out Of Control
8. Saint Of Me
9. Might As Well Get Juiced
10. Always Suffering
11. Too Tight
12. Thief In The Night
13. How Can I Stop

Product Details

  • Audio CD (September 30, 1997)
  • Original Release Date: 1997
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Virgin Records Us
  • ASIN: B000000WEZ
  • Average Customer Review: 3.7 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (107 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #205,915 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

3.7 out of 5 stars

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

22 of 24 people found the following review helpful By B. L. Vor Broker on January 21, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Having read all the previous reviews slamming the Stones for their age and lack of feel, I am compelled to defend the Greatest Rock and Roll Band in the World. I think it is widely agreed upon that the Stones' prime was '68-'72 (Beggars Banquet, Let It Bleed, Sticky Fingers, Exile on Main Street). With that in mind, every album before and after has been inferior. Bridges to Babylon, being a good 25 years after their prime, cannot be compared to the greatness of the Great Four. The fact that a group of 50+ year old men, who have been through what the Stones have been through (drugs, alchohol, the spotlight since they were 20), can even put out an album is in itself a great accomplishment. In Bridges to Babylon, the Stones show few signs of age. They rock when they need to (Flip the Switch, Out of Control, Saint of Me) and Keith is at his best with 3 superb songs proving that at least he still has the heart rather than greed. Bridges to Babylon is not going to be like the Stones were in their prime. This is post-70's Stones at arguably their best. Anyone who disagrees either never liked the Stones in the first place or just put them down because they are old. If you people didn't know their age or past greatness, your reviews would be much better. I think we are all thankful that the Stones didn't quit in the 70s, and Bridges to Babylon proves it.
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14 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Boss Fan on September 4, 2005
Format: Audio CD
A psudo-sequel to their similarly under-rated "Voodoo Lounge," The Stones'"Bridges To Babylon" is similar in tone and content (which is a good thing), but has less of the lulls and clutter that plagued that previous effort in spots (which is an even better thing). "Bridges" is fast-paced, straight-ahead rocker full of diverse and atypical Stones tracks. Never do we not know we are listening to the Stones, but we are often surprised at what we are hearing from them. Witness "Might as Well Get Juiced." It's not just the more experimental cuts that will leave listeners pleasently surprised, but the hard-edge return to old-school-Stones form that pops up from time to time. "Gunface," for instance, is the type of seathing, "Jumpin' Jack Flash/Gimme Shelter" cut the band used to turn out so effortlessly. While nothing here is admittedly at the level of those classics, that is certainly no reason to miss out on an all around great album. Compaired to the high standards of classic Stones cuts it may not stand out much, but compared to almost all of their albums from the previous decade, and to any album from any band at the time, "Bridges to Babylon" is far and away at the top of its class. "Out of Control" and "Saint of Me," however, do, to these ears, rank among the bands' classics. And Keith closes the album with two wheezy ballads that should grind the whole affair to a screetching hult; and undoubtably would from almost anyone else. Somehow it not only works, but stands up with the rest of the album, even towing over the two ballads Mick submits. "Bridges" is an ambitious amalgam of different musical styles all poured through a Rolling Stones filter. The result is never less than an enjoyable classic rock and roll listen - done by the band best at doing it - and it is often a lot more.
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15 of 18 people found the following review helpful By G. J Wiener on October 7, 1998
Format: Audio CD
Whereas Bridges To Babylon is not on the same playing field as Beggars Banquet and Exile, this recording has much high quality material. Besides catchy straight ahead rockers(Out Of Control, Two Tight), there are many other elements present here including a nice touch of techno(Anybody Seen My Baby, Might As Well Get Juiced). Keith's contributions are excellent specifically the regaae flavored You Don't Have To Mean It. The difference between this albums and the Stonefs best works is that every track is loaded with contributions from studio musicians. The old days it was purely the fab five with occasional contributions from Billy Preston, Bobbie Keys, and a few others.
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7 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Popmart42@AOL.com on November 5, 1999
Format: Audio CD
You know, looking at the embarassing state of rock music today, I'd give an arm and a leg for a new Rolling Stones album. With "Bridges to Babylon", this ageless band DELIVERS. Ok, it is 1999, and obviously the Stones pretty much peaked creatively with 1970's "Sticky Fingers", and then came close to that rise again with 1978's "Some Girls", and then delivered just a plain top-notch rock record with 1981's "Tattoo You". But for the record, "Bridges to Babylon" is as close as you can get to a Rolling Stones masterpiece in the 1990's. After seeing the boys on the "No Security" tour a few months back, it simply amazes me that four guys in their mid-50's can put on a more entertaining, energetic, exciting, and worthwhile show than any modern garbage "rock" acts can. With "Bridges", the Stones put their live sensibilities into the studio and along with some cool experimentation, craft an album the both rocks in traditional Stones style, and feels fresh and modern at the same time. The songs on "Bridges" are some of the best that the Jagger/Richards team has come up with in a while, even if they haven't changed their basic structures for some 30 years. Those big fat Richards riffs adorn rockers like "Flip the Switch", "Gunface", "Low Down" and the absolutely magnificent "Saint of Me". Keith may not be a virtuoso, but he wisely sticks to what he's good at. But the really interesting (for the Stones anyway) stuff are the more "razzled" cuts. Theres some sweet wah-wah pedal work by Ronnie Wood on the excellent "Out of Control", which is awesome live, and some reggea flavorings on "You Don't Have to Mean it".Read more ›
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