Customer Reviews


1,221 Reviews
5 star:
 (650)
4 star:
 (276)
3 star:
 (131)
2 star:
 (88)
1 star:
 (76)
 
 
 
 
 
Average Customer Review
Share your thoughts with other customers
Create your own review
 
 

The most helpful favorable review
The most helpful critical review


82 of 89 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Time to get noticed!
While most people will read this book because of the movie version starring Renee Zellweger, its important to remember that the book has been around for quite a bit of time, and that its essential reading even if you have seen the film.
The problem with reading a book AFTER you've seen the movie version is that you undeniably relive the scenes with the cinematic...
Published on April 15, 2001 by Marc Cabir Davis

versus
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars enough with the insecurities!!
At the beginning of this novel I was surprisingly pleased with the funny way she spoke of the insecurities that plague allmost all women in this day and age. We all have the fat day, the too many drinks day, the hate all men and wish they would all spontainously combust day etc. I found myself laughing out loud at certian points relating to the character. But, then...
Published on June 25, 2001 by Lauren Scaravelli


‹ Previous | 1 2123 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

82 of 89 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Time to get noticed!, April 15, 2001
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
While most people will read this book because of the movie version starring Renee Zellweger, its important to remember that the book has been around for quite a bit of time, and that its essential reading even if you have seen the film.
The problem with reading a book AFTER you've seen the movie version is that you undeniably relive the scenes with the cinematic players in mind. Luckily, my time with this book was spent before the film opened and I was able to appreciate Helen's attempts at comedy with a better perspective on what she was trying to do - create a female character so flawed and jinxed, that it was impossible but to fall in love with her.
I must say that some of the scenes here read funnier than when they made it to film. But to give it credit, the movie version excelled in portions that were more or less underplayed in the book - the blue soup incident, and the mom-on-TV segments especially. However, I must say that the quality of language and the author's writing style here are wonderful and quite exceptional. Rarely has there been a book that makes you want to meet the lead character, but this one does just fine on that count.
The only concern I had is that while Bridget Jones's Diary is a journal that takes you through a girl's life in a year, the movie seemed to be more a collection of little vignettes, focussing less on the diary itself - though in the end, its the diary that brings her happiness and the man she loves. Readers may find the climax a bit silly (it looks even more contrived on film) but keep in mind this was written for twenty-somethings looking for a way to pass their time on a lonely weeknight, and not for aspiring professors of literature. Still, there are highly comic moments, and I'd have to give it to the author for sustaining my interest in the book until the very end.
And yes, if you're wondering if all your favorite scenes from the movie are there in the book, well, the answer is both yes and no. And there are bits and pieces that I found essential to the story that were left out from the movie, but thats no big deal. As a novel, this reads very well, and its satisfying to learn that it will gain renewed attention now that the film version is out.
On another note, when I first read the book, I did not at all picture Bridget the way Renee does her in the film. I saw her more as a plump Toni Collette ('Muriel's Wedding' and 'Emma') or a bloated Kate Winslet ('Sense and Sensibility', and 'Jude'). Also, the Hugh Grant character seems more suave and smooth than Hugh does on film - a Rupert Everett or Jeremy Northam was what I first thought of in this role. However, Bridget's mum is as funny here as she is in the film. What I really love about the entire Bridget Jones Diary madness going around is that the film really compliments the book and is a faithful reproduction, for the most part. If you're a person whos been thinking about reading this book based on the hype thats been circulating, I would urge you to get it now. For once, heres a work of comic writing thats worth your time.
Highly recommended!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


19 of 19 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A Quick, Fun, Hilariously Enjoyable Read!, June 10, 2001
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
I was sort of dragged to see this film the night it came out, but I ended up enjoying it immensely. Of course, I had to buy the book next, and it kept me company on a long cross-country flight. With all the humor of Nick Hornby, the self-deprecation of Woody Allen, and a plot borrowed from a classic, Fielding's narrative moves quickly and surely; always funny and ever-endearing, Bridget Jones's attempts to move from insecure singleness make for an engaging and hilarious read.
The humor of "Bridget Jones's Diary" is its strongest quality. From the exchange between Bridget and her boss, Daniel, regarding the absence-due-to-sick-leave of Bridget's apparently too-short skirt, to the Tarts and Vicars fiasco, there's a lot to laugh at in this book. Fielding does funny well, but she's also good for a pithy rejoinder in the Cruelty Department; the American woman Bridget catches her man Daniel with says, as Bridget is leaving, "I thought you said she was thin." Ouch.
Some of the reviews here have bashed "Bridget" for ripping off Austen, which is a little unfair. Rewrites like this are nothing new--see Jean Rhys' "Wide Sargasso Sea," which updates "Jane Eyre," or David Lodge's "Nice Work," which does ditto for Gaskell's "North and South," or Peter Carey's "Jack Maggs," a skewed perspective on "Great Expectations." Fielding's contribution to this growing genre (the nineteenth-century rewrite) is more openly self-aware than some, and she allows herself and Bridget to have an awful lot of fun with "Pride and Prejudice," even pointing comically to other versions of this classic, like the BBC series. I don't see this in the least as a detractor from one's enjoyment of "Bridget Jones."
The one thing that does detract, for me, is the incessant inclusion, at the outset of every chapter, of updated data on Bridget's running battle with her weight and waistline. There are occasional comic variations on the theme, but I felt, for the most part, that they were a distraction that I soon came to disregard. Unlike the recipes that commence every chapter of Laura Esquivel's "Like Water for Chocolate" and have significant symbolic resonance throughout the chapter they introduce, Fielding's chapter-epigraphs in lbs. and calories don't seem to add much to the ongoing story. (What's interesting is that Fielding apparently noticed this while writing the screenplay; in the film, she leaves them out after about the first five minutes, realizing that it was a trick that gets old fast.) But that's not much to complain about.
Overall, I would recommend this book for its humor alone. However, add to that comedy a fairly well-crafted plot that pokes fun at a classic while yet paying it homage and bringing it up to date, and you've got a great, fun read. I totally enjoyed "Bridget Jones's Diary" and hope to read the sequel soon.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


96 of 114 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars The truth hurts so good, May 15, 1999
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
This book has received some of the most vicious and petty reviews of any in recent history. Of course if Fielding had been a man, she would have been universally appluaded for her exhuberent wit and candor and entertainment skills. As a woman she is ripe for marginilization and outright crucifixtion. How sad that we as a culture havent evolved to a sense of humor about ourselves as women -- that every heroine must be living alone and loving it, performing neurosurgery for charity, or ladling soup to ophans unless she is to be praised. The fact that this book rocketed to the bestseller list and stayed there speaks for itself. I found it fun, hilarious, fresh, charming and a great read -- bridget is self deprecating, doesnt claim to be mother theresa or ghandi. why must we wish that on her? nick hornby wrote with wit and irreverence about his sex life and everyone just about broke a leg trying to deify him (I love him too) but helen fielding is being skewered with red hot needles, and I'm not sure why. she wrote a comic novel, not a sequel to The Feminine Mystique. So what? And it may be true that this book doesnt hit everyone's mirth spot -- then why not just ignore it? why go out of one's way to throw poison darts? I think I know why. It's called Jealousy, and it's been aorund since the beginning of time. Ms Fielding deserves not derision, but applause -- for a sharply honed novel and for starting a Bad girl trend that moves away from the banal let's not-offend-anyone-or-tell-too-many-truths claptrap that female writers seem doomed to. Helen? I say write another book, make it even more shocking and irreverent, and send your critics a superbly wrapped lemon they can suck on. I thought her plot was skillfill and would make a terrific film, especilly the finale. Loved it, and that doesn;t make me a mindless idiot. It makes me human.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


14 of 14 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars don't skip this just because you saw the movie, October 14, 2005
By 
Miss Ivonne (Louisville, KY USA) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
Time's tight for all of us. That's why you'll be tempted to skip reading "Bridget Jones's Diary" if you saw the movie. Don't!

The movie is, of course, darling with cute Renee Zellwenger, uptight but decent Colin Firth and Hugh Grant as the epitome of the gorgeous, smooth-talking cad. However, the book is much, much better. You'll miss the uproariously funny details inherent in the format of Bridget's diary (e.g., counting cigarettes and calories, the despair of falling off the wagon, the recriminations common to all young women's diaries -- and low self-esteem). Reading this was like reliving my own misspent youth. By necessity, the movie had to shear big sections of the book out of the screenplay -- and you won't want to miss a juicy day of Bridget's year-long diary. Also, the movie treatment of some of Bridget's adventures just aren't as clever or funny as Helen Fielding's handling.

It's a cliché to say you'll laugh out loud. But in this case, it's actually true. Don't miss reading Helen Fielding's gem just because you saw the big-screen version.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


10 of 10 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars A must read for every girl out there!, March 30, 2001
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
With terms like Singletons, Smug Marrieds and Whippersnappers... Bridget Jones tells us what it's like being a single woman in London in the modern times. Through her diary, the reader is able see right into her mind. Oh her obsession with counting things... like her weight, counting calories, cigarettes smoked, alcohol contents consumed among other things is hilarious with her special comments next to them. Her obsession with Mr. Darcy (especially the wet shirt bit) from Pride and Prejudice (along with her friends Shazz and Jude) Bridget has several interesting encounters with her own Mr. Mark Darcy. Stuck in a dead end job and doomed relationships- Bridget shares with us her every day life, which is filled with outrageously embarrassing situations to mundane everyday things. Although, with Bridget Jones, everyday mundane things are not really mundane at all! These daily entries are funny and absolutely engrossing!! And found myself laughing outloud not just because the heroine is a crack-up but because I was able to relate so much to Bridget! I actually noticed myself writing more like her in my own journal entries... I loved reading about a woman who got into more humiliating scrapes and embarrassing situations more than me! There really is a Bridget Jones in every woman. Can't wait to read Edge of Reason!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


9 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars My review... a la Bridget Jones., May 12, 2001
By A Customer
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
Found book to be contagiously engrossing. Interesting that pronouns are exempt due to diary format, however, allows for a light, fresh approach to modern day Pride and Prejudice.
1:30 pm
Am staring at review screen attempting to think of witty and charming things to write about Fielding's novel. Going over a multitude of scenes in head to describe, but feel strongly that one must read book to fully appreciate Bridget's obsessive-compulsive sometimes daft character.
1:33 pm
Aha! Have hit upon excellent choice of words for review. Ahem. When first heard of Bridget Jones's Diary instantly thought as Cosmopolitan type top pick book for lounging in sun on hot days thus must be sleazy literature. After reading novel, feel very badly for such snobby presumptions and highly recommend book to almost anyone for a good laugh, a bit of insight into self, and an illustration of being single in your 30's.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
3.0 out of 5 stars enough with the insecurities!!, June 25, 2001
By 
Lauren Scaravelli (Halifax, NS, Canada) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
At the beginning of this novel I was surprisingly pleased with the funny way she spoke of the insecurities that plague allmost all women in this day and age. We all have the fat day, the too many drinks day, the hate all men and wish they would all spontainously combust day etc. I found myself laughing out loud at certian points relating to the character. But, then about half way through I started to get quite annoyed. I mean her largest weight, once translated from stones to pounds, is like 130lbs, and then the book started to wear on me like a friend that constantly complains ablout her weight searching for you to tell her, no hon you look great. I became bothered by the fact that this women could not find anything about herself too be happy about, that she could not find any measure of peace alone and that only in finding of a man would her life be fulfilled. By the end of the book I felt that she had become a character that bothered me, so I couldn't root for her, instead I felt like grabbing her and yelling, "suck it up for gods sake"!!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


7 of 7 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Parallels, Parody, Pleasure, January 13, 2001
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
Bridget Jones's diary was funny enough to read three times running and my pleasure in this book was shared with a number of female friends. Men do not appear to understand the humour, which is hardly surprising as it deals largely with the female psyche and response to life and relationship issues. Bridget is a somewhat exaggerated character, but this device works to entertain women by presenting an extreme version of some of their own foibles. A source of particular amusement and pleasure for me were the plot parallels with Jane Austin's Pride and Prejudice. Never so obvious as to be irritating, the parallels are none the less obvious enough that they are not to be taken seriously but simply enjoyed. Bridget Jones's Diary is not LIKE Jane Austin's books, but it has a similar scope. That is, it deals with the social interactions between people, with relationships, and with the petty social discourse that is yet so crucially important to our lives.
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Laugh out loud funny, June 4, 2005
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
In one of those coincidence thingies, both this book and the movie landed on my desk at the same time. Recognizing a sign when I saw one, I started with the book, seeing that it was written before the movie, and things should, after all, go in their natural order.

The first thing I had to do was go back in time a bit and try to remember my tables, when I realized that the little notations like 8st 11 were references to weight. After spending a few moments contemplating the complexity of 14 times tables, I took out my calculator to work out that Bridget weighed 129 lbs at the first chapter. This I thought was perfectly normal for a healthy young woman, and tried to remember if I had weighed that little at birth.

Fast forwarding to the summary of this outrageously funny book, I can tell you that it is about the hilarious episodes that led to Bridget Jones drinking 3,836 units of alcohol, smoking 5,277 cigarettes, eating 11,090,265 calories, gaining 72 lbs and losing 73 within a calendar year.

Laid out in the format of entries in a diary (hence the title - duh), we get the privilege of following every calamity and crisis of her romantic life (mostly pitiful), her weight swings (ongoing), her mother's midlife crisis (v.g.), her neurotic friends and their problems (numerous), her job exploits (unimpressive), her weakness for gambling on scratch cards (improvement required) and her cooking skills (non existent)

Once you pick it up you'll want to finish it in one sitting, and I was laughing out loud without even caring that people were beginning to edge away from me. (not so good). Just when you think you have the measure of the book, it picks up the pace in the last chapters, and turns into a madcap romp of pure reading pleasure.

Highly recommended for everyone except males with commitment problems, those dreadful people who can eat all they want without gaining weight, and European con men.

Amanda Richards, June 4, 2005
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


6 of 6 people found the following review helpful
4.0 out of 5 stars A very funny and light read, March 10, 2001
By 
This review is from: Bridget Jones's Diary (Paperback)
I guess I'm late on the bandwagon as I just picked this book up the other day. It's a very quicky and easy read. I didn't necessarily think it was "hysterical", but it had it's moments where I was highly amused.
I think this book comically conveys that society as a whole expect that women, once in their thirties, to get married and start having children. And if they don't, then they are unhappy. And then there's the other side of the coin - the married thirty-somethings, although somewhat content in their married lives, sometimes wish they were single again as they crave that freedom of singledom. A double-edged sword. I believe it portrays a very realistic view of those expectations as well as the flaws in both of those generalizations.
Some people may see this book as a stereotypical view of women. A thirty-something women is obsessed about her weight, men, smoking, being alone. But haven't all women, at one time or another, experienced those same apprehensions? I know that I have. While I've never gone to the extreme that Bridget has, I can relate. And so, I relished with great interest, what would happen to Bridget next. I also liked the group of people around Bridget, it was good to see that see had such good friends.
I definitely recommend this book. It may help you realize that maybe you shouldn't take things so seriously. No doubt about it - it's a fun book!
Help other customers find the most helpful reviews 
Was this review helpful to you? Yes No


‹ Previous | 1 2123 | Next ›
Most Helpful First | Newest First

Details

Bridget Jones's Diary: A Novel (Penguin Ink)
Bridget Jones's Diary: A Novel (Penguin Ink) by Helen Fielding (Paperback - June 29, 2010)
$16.00 $11.50
In Stock
Add to cart Add to wishlist
Search these reviews only
Send us feedback How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you? Let us know here.