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  • Bridging The Future
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Bridging The Future


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Product Details

  • Producers: William Woollard
  • Format: NTSC
  • Region: All Regions
  • Studio: DigiComTV
  • DVD Release Date: September 23, 2009
  • Run Time: 52 minutes
  • Average Customer Review: 5.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (1 customer review)
  • ASIN: B002QQ7SFG
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #707,642 in Movies & TV (See Top 100 in Movies & TV)

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Editorial Reviews

Ever since he has had a ditch or a river to cross man had been building bridges. In fact the oldest bridges go back to around 4000BC. And Roman engineers threw bridges across great rivers like the Danube and the Rhine as their armies marched across Europe. Today bridge building is at the very cutting edge of technology as engineers strive to use the lightest possible materials to build longer and longer spans across estuaries and island straits. Few engineers would have believed it possible to join Europe with Asia by bridging the Bosporus, with a span of over 3500 ft, and now we have the world record Akashi Straits Bridge in Japan with a span of over 6500ft. This highly praised documentary gives us a unique view of the world through the bridge builder's eyes. NTSC - 52 minutes.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

This is an extremely educational program about bridges, their construction and why they sometimes collapse. The program outlines one of the very first recorded bridge collaspes of 1879. The Tay Bridge disaster occurred during a violent storm on December 28, 1879 when the first Tay Rail Bridge collapsed while a train was passing over it from Wormit to Dundee,killing all aboard. The bridge - designed by Sir Thomas Bouch - used lattice girders supported by iron piers, with cast iron columns and wrought iron cross-bracing. The piers were narrower and their cross-bracing was less extensive and robust than on previous similar designs by Bouch.

Bouch had sought expert advice on "wind loading" when designing a proposed rail bridge over the Firth of Forth; as a result of that advice he had made no explicit allowance for wind loading in the design of the Tay Bridge. There were other flaws in detailed design, in maintenance, and in quality control of castings, all of which were, at least in part, Bouch's responsibility.

Bouch died within the year, with his reputation as an engineer ruined. Future British bridge designs had to allow for wind loadings of up to 56 pounds per square foot. Consequently,Bouch's design for the Forth Rail Bridge was never used.

Amazing archival film footage of the Tay Bridge collapse, as well as other bridge collapses. This program also explores the tallest bridge in the world piercing the sky above the verdant hills of southern France.

Celebrated as a work of art and an object of French national pride, the Millau bridge will enable motorists to take a drive through the sky -- 891 feet above the Tarn River valley for a 1.6-mile stretch through France's Massif Central mountains.
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