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A Brief History of Economics: Artful Approaches to the Dismal Science Paperback – July 15, 2001

ISBN-13: 978-9810238490 ISBN-10: 9810238495 Edition: 2nd

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Product Details

  • Paperback: 481 pages
  • Publisher: World Scientific Pub Co Inc; 2nd edition (July 15, 2001)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 9810238495
  • ISBN-13: 978-9810238490
  • Product Dimensions: 1.3 x 6 x 8.5 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (2 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,824,613 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"No one interested in economics - and it's an interest all shrewd citizens should cultivate - will want to miss Ray Canterbery... He has established himself as an incisive and interesting scholar who greatly prefers truth to the orthodox applause... Canterbery always has a good foundation of fact, analysis and judgement to support his positions." John Kenneth Galbraith Harvard University "Canterbery's unique style of presentation and breadth of vision manages to breathe new life into the study of dead economists... Really helps the reader conjure up a vision of the economic times... A fine addition to the history of thought literature." Michael C Carroll Journal of Economic Issues

About the Author

In January 1996, Prentice-Hall, Inc. selected E Ray Canterbery for their Hall of Fame Economist Baseball Cards for "significant contributions to the economics discipline," including "developing one of the first complete mathematical theories of foreign exchange; a new theory of the labor market and of personal incomes (vita theory), which later was integrated into international trade theory; independently of Pasinetti, developing a production model of the total value added required in both labor and profits, proving also that profit margins equal price markups; several policy ideas that have become real world economic policies." Active in many economics associations, Canterbery served as President of the Eastern Economics Association in 1986-1987 and President of the International Trade and Finance Association in 1998-1999. He is an elected member of the New York Academy of Sciences. Canterbery was one of the earliest critics of Alan Greenspan's monetary policy. Canterbery wrote of how Greenspan, as the most influential Cheerleader of the "New Economy," helped to hype the American stock market into a giant bubble destined to burst. Canterbery was correct: Greenspan was wrong. Only now have other economists and financial experts jumped on this prescient critic's bandwagon as it now passes before their delayed perceptions! The International Biography Centre in Cambridge, England includes Canterbery among 500 persons worldwide in its Living Legends (2002), among 2000 scholars worldwide in their Outstanding Scholars in the 21st Century, and among the select One Thousand Great Americans (2002). The American Biographical Institute includes Canterbery in its Great Minds of the 21st Century (2003). --This text refers to an alternate Paperback edition.

More About the Author

E. Ray Canterbery is the author of many acclaimed books, including, most recently, Harry S. Truman, The Economics of a Populist President, and before that, The Global Great Recession. In press is The Rise and Fall of Global Austerity (now available on Amazon.com). He has also published a novel, Black Box, Inc., while authoring two biographies (Alan Greenspan: The Oracle Behind the Curtain and F. Scott Fitzgerald: Under the Influence, with Thomas D. Birch), as well as other works in economics. His A Brief History of Economics is a best-seller. He also is the author of some 100 articles and reviews.

Canterbery has served as President of the Eastern Economics Association and of the International Trade and Finance Association. In January 1996, Prentice-Hall, Inc. selected him for one of their 100 Hall of Fame Economist Baseball Cards for "significant contributions to the economics discipline," including "developing one of the first complete mathematical theories of foreign exchange." He was a Truman Scholar during 2001-04, during which he collected copies of documents related to his book on Harry Truman.

The International Biography Centre in Cambridge, England includes Canterbery among 500 persons worldwide in its Living Legends(2002), among 2000 scholars worldwide in its Outstanding Scholars in the 21st Century, in 1000 Great Intellectuals (2003, in 2000 Outstanding People (2003), and in 1000 Great Americans (2003). The American Biographical Institute includes Canterbery in its Great Minds of the 21st Century (2002) and American Biography (2003). He has also been listed in Marquis Who's Who in the World and Who's Who in America, as well as other biographical sources.

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Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Jim Sitnik on March 24, 2013
Format: Paperback
I have a personal interest in economics and have read a couple rudimentary college economic books on my own. But I wanted to learn more about economics than just lines and graphs. I wanted a book that talked about the major economists. This book does that and more.

The book gives a short personal history of the economists that are mentioned and the relationships between them and their different theories. The author even throws in some literary references here and there. (The author states that literature often states the real economic conditions of certain time periods.)

The book was very readable. It does not weight you down with heavy math or an intense review of graphs behind economic theory. Generally, when it gets into the math that supports whatever theory, it is usually just 3 or 4 pages long and is explained in an understandable, logical way. What I did for myself while I was reading was I took notes just here and there to remind me of what economist had what theory.

The book is well ordered; it is pretty much a time line from Adam Smith to Milton Friedman. The book builds upon each new theory and each new economist comparing schools of thought that came before until the end when... when we reach Reaganomics.

Reading about Reaganomics was the toughest reading of the book. This is the only part of the book that I found difficult. I found the complexities of Reagonomics are... somewhat off the wall. I'm going to have to go back and re-read that section. This is the main reason why I did not give the book 5 stars. Someone who is more versed in economics might better understand this section in one reading. However, the author's concluding opinion of Reagonomics is very clear. (Hint: It is not positive.
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By Philip G. Pryor on June 24, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Here is a book to explain the foggy and even filthy aspects of that great guessing game of economics. Pure economics would have been an adjunct of philosophy, especially in areas of ethics and morals. Just as medical sciences like surgery and dentistry have been hijacked and abused by those desiring enhanced teeth, tits, vulvae and eye and lip surrounds,(or the fat) so economics has been abused by the greedy, ambitious, crooked and devious. To justify behaviour of extreme antisocial and selfish acquisitiveness, some economists and fringe financial figures have turned economics into a bloody, noholdsbarred death struggle, with Keynes and Hayek lately being worshipped or denounced by half-baked wannabe seers and opinioneers. Ray Canterbery gives a broad, witty, informative scale and analysis to it all. You can see how a fraud of a female impersonator with grudges going back through the Tsars and Lenin, one A Rand, can be appealing to those seeking justifiable excuses for whole careers. You can learn how a tissue thin mentality can become a manipulatable president of the USA, purely to get noticed and be relieved. You might learn of the imprudence many had in believing and following false messiahs in Greenspan, Friedman, Volcker, etc. You can see how the Milkens and Madoffs came and went, with more likely. World finance, especially USA trends, frighten us, leave the honest hardworking job holder and seeker in fear, the investor on the outside of the pillaging gangs in danger. Why do we allow it, this "crime"? This is the best single book to unravel, all too late, some of the machinations of that moneyed type and class which wants to control and corner the wealth, with all the political and social power that it promises. Adam Smith might smile, Marx would have said he told us, Keynes would have denounced his messed up supporters. Read it well.
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