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Bring Me My Machine Gun: The Battle for the Soul of South Africa, from Mandela to Zuma Hardcover – April 13, 2009

4.4 out of 5 stars 14 customer reviews

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Editorial Reviews

From Booklist

From 1993 to 1997, British journalist Russell reported from Johannesburg and witnessed the “fairy-tale” ending of apartheid with the release of Mandela. Now he returns to find South Africa still has one of the world’s starkest divides between rich and poor, little redistribution of land, and continuing rampant corruption. In open, journalistic style, he looks in depth and detail at the stalled dream of peace and reconciliation, and he speaks to the leaders, including Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Jacob Zuma, and also to many ordinary people: Afrikaners in a small town, with their casual, unacknowledged racism about “they” and “them”; blacks in the poverty-stricken townships, who want just modest change: running water and electricity, health care, education. Scathing in his criticism of newly rich magnates, he also exposes the two-faced liberals. He shows close-up that the widely reported attacks on immigrants are rooted in the anger and anguish of the poor and dispossessed. This is exciting contemporary history, a must for anyone concerned with what is happening now. --Hazel Rochman

Review

Peter Godwin, author of When a Crocodile Eats the Sun
“A vivid portrait of post-apartheid South Africa, briskly depicting the dramas of a young nation and the telling threats to its future.”

Kirkus Reviews, March 1, 2009
Financial Times world news editor Russell offers a cogent study of the political perils ensnaring South Africa since the fall of apartheid…. An important dispatch from a journalist in the trenches.”

Booklist, review 4/15
“In open, journalistic style, Russell looks in depth and detail at the stalled dream of peace and reconciliation…. This is exciting contemporary history, a must for anyone concerned with what is happening now.”

Gillian Slovo, Financial Times, 4/4
Bring Me My Machine Gun, layered with anecdote, historical background and close scrutiny of recent events, stands as an informative, nuanced, and provocative end-of-era report…. A valuable contribution to the debate about the future of the rainbow nation. Alec Russell has looked at the country with a sympathetic and knowledgeable eye and he leaves his reader with a deep understanding of the challenges to come.”

Washington Post
“Sweeping, up-to-date…. Russell offers an acute look at the remarkable period when apartheid unraveled and a new political system under the African National Congress (ANC) took shape…. A compelling, bracing chronicle of the 15-year campaign to make the promise of 1994 a reality.”

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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 336 pages
  • Publisher: PublicAffairs; 1 edition (April 14, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1586487388
  • ISBN-13: 978-1586487386
  • Product Dimensions: 9.3 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (14 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #985,804 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

Top Customer Reviews

By D. Maree on April 14, 2009
Format: Hardcover
"South Africa's negotiated transition from white rule to democracy was one of the wonders of the late twentieth century. But it was only the first chapter of the postliberation narrative."

In Bring Me My Machine Gun Financial Times journalist Alec Russell skillfully chronicles the new struggle underway in South Africa: that of the ruling African National Congress (ANC) to deliver on its democratic promise and avoid the tragic trend of African liberation movements--and dominant political parties from Mexico to India--of descending into corrupt, stagnant, and ultimately dysfunctional states.

In this way, Bring Me My Machine Gun echoes Andrew Feinstein's After the Party, an inside account of the ANC's disastrous arms deal, and Justin Arenstein's exhaustive 2004 investigative report on corruption in South Africa. If, as Arenstein writes, the ongoing saga symbolizes "a painful dissection of the South African psyche," Russell's book is a timely travelogue of this trauma.

On April 22, just two weeks after narrowly escaping prosecution for corruption, Jacob Zuma will take the world stage as President of the Republic of South Africa. The question is whether this marks the beginning or end of the ongoing battle for the country's democratic soul--a complex battle which Russell covers with great depth and detail, borrowing heavily from the insights and high-level sources acquired during his two tours as a foreign correspondent in South Africa.

"Building a new society out of the rubble of an unjust system is invariably an ugly and harsh process," concludes Russell. "But fifteen years into their task, the time for excusing the ANC is over." As it eventually came to do of the apartheid regime, the world must hold the ANC accountable before it's too late.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
The question on everyman's mind is will South Africa make it. Will it end up like Zimbabwe or Zaire, or will it be a large Botswana. The jury is still out. Big man rule for now has not been sustained in South Africa. However corruption is still a large part of the issue in the South African economy. Will the ANC evolve into a party that competes in elections or will it become the equivalent of the PRI in Mexico.

South Africa has made great strides in overcoming apartheid. However it now has to stop the overwhelming violent crime to satisfy its population. Political corruption and mismanagement has to be controlled. Finally, employment and a fair share for the nation's resources has to be distributed to the nation's population.

Russell details the evolving nature of South Africa's political future. It has moved forward, but more needs to be done. This is a nice read for a country that is a model for the rest of Africa.
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Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I have not had the time to read this; but I am looking forward in doing so. Most books (that I find here in the US) in regards to South Africa are outdated; most are still before Mandela, or if they are recent ones, will be about South Africa's history up to Mandela being president. I'm looking forward to this as it appear to be more relevant with South Africa's history. Great service to by seller!
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Fascinating insights into the political motivations and characters behind South Africa since the end of apartheid. Opened my eyes to many new facets of politics - the fact that the fall of Communism in Europe recast the ANC into a party that the white apartheid government believed that it could deal with (they were more afraid of communism than black nationalism) - the Reagan-like qualities of Zuma, an uneducated glad-hander on the surface, with political skills beyond any of his contemporaries - the scale of the AIDS denial disaster propogated by Mbeki who was responsible for a wave of death on the scale of the Holocaust - the mechanics and consequences of BEE (Black Economic Empowerment)and the resulting new, small band of black "oligarchs" in South Africa.
Be sure to read Meredith's "Diamonds, Blood and War" to learn how the events of just 40 years since the discovery of diamonds shaped the country.
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Format: Hardcover
South Africa's political economy continues to revolve around an odd combination of new political power (and patronage) without money and old money without power, each needing the other to advance its interests. This is structurally disposed to advance corruption and nepotism, which has become an 'incestuous relationship'. This is the theme of Alec Russel's important new book [elsewehere, the book is sold as: "After Mandela: The Battle for the Soul of South Africa, Hutchinson", London, 2009].

Alec Russel was a correspondent of the London Financial Times, who first come to South Africa in 1994 and whose interviews and on-the-spot reports makes his one of the more illuminating of the books named above. His focus, not surprisingly, is on the economics of the current transition process and he presents much in the way of statistical evidence to bolster his arguments. In the end, he can be described as a "pessimist". His "solutions" to some of South Africa's economic woes may be summed up by a 'social liberal' philosophy where a 'regulated market' predominates.

At the onset of 'Liberation/Freedom", a new African kleptocracy was being born while "Die Stem" was still hanging in the air! The rest is history, as they say. Sleaze, undercover operations and character assinations (and 'real' ones) became part of the ANC's modus operandi in power. "Ideology" and the once professed goals of poverty amelioration and a "Better Life for All" (ANCs election slogan of 1994), was soon pushed aside as monetary "self-interest", or plain "greed", took its place as an (African) nationalist bourgeoisie was simply replacing an old (Afrikaner) nationalist bourgeoisie at the helm of the state.
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