Customer Reviews

212
4.8 out of 5 stars
Your rating(Clear)Rate this item


There was a problem filtering reviews right now. Please try again later.

64 of 68 people found the following review helpful
on December 28, 2004
Format: Audio CD
By the time of this 1965 release, Dylan had already proven himself a lyrical master and a new legend in the folk universe. With his electrified performance at the Newport Folk Festival, and this half-electric/half-acoustic LP, he showed that he was not only far from done with pushing the envelope, but that he'd really only begun. In particular, his music and subject matter were now catching up to his revolutionary words and lyrical structures.

The album opens full-bore with the blistering word-puzzle "Subterranean Homesick Blues." Backed by a vamping electric blues band, Dylan is at once a protesting outsider, a sardonic social critic, and a free-associating poet. It stands on its own as an incredible piece of rock music, but as the introduction to Dylan's fifth LP, it was something of a warning shot. The electric blues return for the near-rockabilly arrangement of "Maggie's Blues" and a Chuck Berry (ala "Memphis") styled "Outlaw Blues." In between, Dylan crafted extraordinary ballads, including the acidic "She Belongs to Me" and one of his best-ever love songs, "Love Minus Zero/No Limit."

Side two (tracks 7-11) retreats to mostly acoustic presentations, but even here Dylan expanded upon his earlier work, with the surreal story of "Bob Dylan's 115th Dream" and the poetic folk-rock standard "Mr. Tambourine Man." The latter stretches to over 5-1/2 minutes and includes a trio of verses dropped by The Byrds in their hit cover. One of the album's most effective cuts is the 7-1/2 minute "It's Alright Ma, I'm Only Bleeding," a song Dylan had been performing live for several months before recording it. Though recorded with only an acoustic guitar, the venomous lyrics spare no target in their criticism, providing as much fire as any of the electric tunes on side one.

All in all, this is as good a portrait of Dylan's inventions as can be found. It's a showcase for his brilliant writing, his evolving musical exposition and his ability to parlay an unconventional voice into some of the world's most expressive and effective vocals.
1212 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
41 of 46 people found the following review helpful
Format: Audio CD
Some Dylan fans in late 1964 were still trying to figure out why Dylan no longer sang protest songs. His most recent release, "Another Side of Bob Dylan", moved away from the overtly political and angst ridden lyrics of "The Times They Are A-Changin'" and "The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan". Dylan began to write lyrics that probably seemed obscure and nonsensical to his fans at the time. Some are very funny. Some are so rich in imagery and layerings of meaning that even a few listens won't reveal what's going on. Or was the lack of obvious meaning the point? Nonetheless, "Another Side of Bob Dylan" still featured a Dylan playing accompanied by only an acoustic guitar, piano, and harmonica. Fans seemed okay with it until "Bringing it all Back Home" committed folk music heresy. Dylan went electric. And he didn't do it subtly.

The album opens with a blast. "Subterranean Homesick Blues" introduces the folk blues rock that would dominate the rest of Dylan's career. The lyrics read like a warning to young people who just entered the real world: "Lookout kid you're gonna get hit". "Maggie's Farm" continues the electrified onslaught with its 'take this job and shove it' theme. "Outlaw Blues", "On the Road Again", and "Bob Dylan's 115th Dream" (complete with its bizarre false start) further explore Dylan's new blues territory. But blues rock doesn't exhaust this album's range. "She Belongs To Me", and "Love Minus Zero/No Limit" are beautiful ballads that explore the vicissitudes of relationships.

The second half of the album features a mostly acoustic Dylan (with some subtle accompaniment). "Mr. Tambourine Man" went on to become one of his best known songs after the Byrds scored a #1 hit with it in 1965. "Gates of Eden", "It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Bleeding), and "It's all over Now, Baby Blue" continue Dylan's new approach to lyrics. All are amazing songs in the acoustic Dylan tradition.

One very interesting aspect about "Bringing it All Back Home" isn't preserved on the CD release. The vinyl LP release, like all LPs, had two non-continuous sides. Originally, side one ended with "Bob Dylan's 115th Dream". Side Two then began with "Mr. Tambourine Man". This had the effect of creating two separate worlds whenever one flipped the record. The electric Dylan on side one and the acoustic Dylan on side two. Dylan's folk fans probably wore out side two.

For all the reasons mentioned above, "Bringing it All Back Home" remains Dylan's most abrupt transistional album. It also represents the largest shift in style Dylan made in his entire career.

It's hard to imagine the shock the electrified Dylan sent through the folk scene of 1965. Dylan's set at The 1965 Newport Folk Fesitval is now legendary (his band was booed). Cries of "sellout" and even "Judas" rang from audiences (the latter can be heard on the 1966 Albert Hall Concert CD set). The film "Don't Look Back" from this era shows his folk fans questioning him why he "no longer sounds like himself". It caused an outright scandal in Dylan's main fan base. Despite this alienation, "Subterranean Homesick Blues" made the pop charts and greatly expanded Dylan's fan base. From this point on there was no turning back for Dylan. "Bringing it All Back Home" remains one of his best, and one of his most important, albums.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
37 of 43 people found the following review helpful
on September 17, 2006
Format: Audio CD
This is a brilliant album: wonderful songs, beautifully executed. This can't be said for all Dylan albums.

It's easy to overlook, 42 years later, how original this material was when it came out. It was in the months leading up to this album's creation that the Beatles motivated Dylan to move on from his acoustic-folk music, and he motivated the Beatles to move on from their "Twist and Shout" type crap. They moved on to "Revolver" and "Sgt Pepper" and became a brilliant studio-only band, and Dylan moved on to "Highway 61" and "Blond on Blonde" and became an icon. It can be said that this album marked the beginning of modern rock music.

"She Belongs to Me" and "Love Minus Zero" are wonderful love songs; "On the Road Again" and "Dylan's 115th Dream" are hilarious satires; and "Gates of Eden" and "It's alright Ma" are dark, deep cynical masterpieces. How could a 23 year-old put all this together on one album?

People who have been introduced to Dylan by "Time out of Mind" and later material have no idea what a voice he used to have. It has never sounded as good as it does here, especially "It's all Over Now, Baby Blue". I will never get tired of this song.

I have a big part of Dylans output and I think this CD showcases his voice and his songwriting best. "Highway 61" has a kind of garage-band sound that you have to be in the mood for, and "Blonde on Blonde" has a bit of filler, but "Bringing it all Back Home" has no weaknesses.

Critics have been trying to interpret the songs on this album for over 40 years now, especially "It's all Right Ma" and "Gates of Eden", attaching huge significance to words that Dylan himself chose simply because they rhymed. He wasn't trying to change the world; he was just trying to write songs people would enjoy.

So get this CD and enjoy it - there isn't a weak song on it. Make sure you get the digitally re-mastered version, released in '03 - the sound is much better than on the older analog CD (ADD vs AAD). Look for the date on the back.
88 commentsWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
19 of 21 people found the following review helpful
on August 27, 2002
Format: Audio CD
The historical significance of BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME has been discussed ad nauseum: It was Dylan making a strong break away from his folk roots. Its rock sound reshaped the music of the Beatles and just about everyone else who picked up a guitar forever after its 1965 release. It featured five of Dylan's most often covered and replayed classics -- "Subterranean Homesick Blues," "Maggie's Farm," "Mr. Tambourine Man," "It's Alright, Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)" and "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" -- as well as three more favorites of Dylan's core group of fans -- "She Belongs to Me," "Love Minus Zero/No Limit" and "Gates of Eden." It melded rock, folk and beatnik poetry for the first time in a major album. It was the start of the phase of Dylan's career that would soon include his two most lauded albums, HIGHWAY 61 REVISITED and BLONDE ON BLONDE.
But what is often not mentioned is how much FUN this album is to listen to.
Granted, "Mr. Tambourine Man," "It's Alright Ma" and "Gates of Eden" are classic Dylan epics -- long, complex, packed with striking imagery and poetic wordplays in each line. But this album also features rocking pop hits that leave the listener bouncing in his seat ("Subterranean Homesick Blues," "Maggie's Farm"), beautiful and melancholy love or love-gone-wrong songs ("Love Minus Zero/No Limit," "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue") and even shaggy dog stories showcasing the impish sense of humor that would later bring Dylan to mind when interpreters were attempting to identify the man behind the jester character in Don McLean's "American Pie" ("On the Road Again," "Bob Dylan's 115th Dream").
In other words, there's something on this album for every mood. Which may be why it's even more beloved for its singles than the future album epics HIGHWAY 61 and BLONDE ON BLONDE. And, in fact, BRINGING IT ALL BACK HOME doesn't hang together as well as the succeeding two releases, and certainly not as well as JOHN WESLEY HARDING or NEW MORNING. But it's more versatile than any of those other albums. On the one hand, you can sit down and really LISTEN to it, catching all the nuances of Dylan's lyrics, admiring his musical fireworks, laughing at his jokes. Or you can play it in your car, at work, as background music while you write or clean or work out, and it's not distracting.
Best of all, you can take advantage of an aspect of CD's not available to the original vinyl audience. Simply press the "Shuffle" button, and this becomes a whole new album to be rediscovered.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
15 of 16 people found the following review helpful
on May 23, 2008
Format: Audio CD
It seems hard to believe now both as to the performer as well as to what was being attempted that anyone would take umbrage at a performer using an electric guitar to tell a folk story (or any story for that matter). It is not necessary to go into all the details of what or what did not happen with Pete Seeger at the Newport Folk Festival in 1965 to know that one should be glad, glad as hell, that Bob Dylan continued to listen to his own drummer and carry on a career based on electronic music.

Others have, endlessly, gone on about Bob Dylan's role as the voice of his generation (and mine), his lyrics and what they do or do not mean and his place in the rock or folk pantheons, or both. I just want to comment on a couple of songs here. Obviously, no one will ever really unravel what the meaning of Subterranean Homesick Blues is about except that it has produced one of the most famous lines of the 1960's- `you don't need a weatherman to know which way the wind blows' (although if the truth be known you do) that I am fond of using anytime I get a change to use it as a political cutting edge. Love Minus Zero No Limit is one of the great modern love songs that will along with a few others define what love, longing and companionship meant for our generation ('my love is like some raven at my window with a broken wing' says more above love than half the sonnets every written).

Needless to say Gates of Eden is the modern equivalent of John Milton's Paradise Lost (and I do not mean to use that praise hyperbolically). If Milton was explaining the ways of god to man in the aftermath of the defeat of the English Revolution then Dylan was attempting to give his take on the eternal verities for modern times.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
22 of 25 people found the following review helpful
on October 12, 2003
Format: Audio CD
'Bringing It All Back Home' sounds a bit like the work of an artist who had ideas for two albums, but for some reason, decided to put the different-sounding material on one album. Bob Dylan, by 1965, was getting tired of playing "cause concerts" and folk festivals and wanted to play rock and roll. Of course, his stalwart fans at the time hated it, saying he abandoned them, but it was the first major evolution of an ever-evolving artist. 'Subterranean Homesick Blues' uncompromisingly jumps right into the fast rock and roll sound, along with the heavily electric 'Outlaw Blues' and 'Bob Dylan's 115th Dream' (my personal favorite of the album). It isn't until 'Mr. Tambourine Man' that any shades of Dylan's previous work are revisited. As a cohesive unit, this album is miles away from 'Highway 61 Revisited' or 'John Wesley Harding', but this album is a flawless collection of great songs, not unified by any certain sound and is probably the representative, definitive 1960s Bob Dylan album (simply based on the fact that it is more of a grab-bag type work, with heavy blues, rock and roll, ballads, surrealist epics, folk songs, and protest songs; just about every type of 1960s Bob Dylan song).
This SACD/CD re-release is very clear and well-balanced. The mix sounds very bright, much like the 'Highway 61 Revisited' remaster, and avoids any kind of fake digital effects unlike a bit of of post-milennium remasters. The guitars are rock solid, the drums crack, and Dylan's voice is right up in the center. One can never truly appreciate Bob Dylan without owning this album. This is exceptional music.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
14 of 15 people found the following review helpful
VINE VOICEon July 16, 2007
Format: Audio CDVerified Purchase
This is IT.
This is where, in retrospect, it all started. I didn't realize it at the time but I do now. There were two sixties, the early 60-64, Beach Boys, Frankie Avalon, Annette Funicello, early Beatle "I Want to Hold you Hand", crew-cut, clean-cut, A-line dress, beehive hair, Bass Weejun, khaki, American Graffiti sixties, and the other sixties, the Revolver, Sgt Pepper, Jimi Hendrix, Steppenwolf, The Doors, Led Zeppelin, Cream, United States of America, hippy sixties that everyone today thinks was the sixties, happened AFTER 1965. And it all started with this album!

Bob Dylan, the antiwar, civil-rights, Woody Guthrie-imitating darling of the folksingers, the Voice and Conscience of his Generation, after penning "Blowin in the Wind", and "The Masters of War", stunned his purist followers with "Bringing it All Back Home". Electric instruments and a turn from trying to change the world by preaching at it to a bemused surreal satire. This, and "Revolver" are the two most influential albums of the sixties, maybe of music history. I remember.

The Beatles were wildly popular with younger listeners, but generally dismissed by music critics of the time as being a wildly sucessful but totally Pop phenominon. Dylan said they were "Bubblegum". Dylan's friend Al Aronowitz (sp?), said that the Beatles weren't that bad. Dylan and friend were introduced to the Beatles at a certain party in Manhattan AUG 64, whereat someone offered Lennon his first smoke. Lennon "took a drink from Dr Robert's special cup". Dylan and Lennon talked and found they had a lot in common. Dylan suggested Lennon should put more of his feelings into his songs. Following this party, the Beatles became much better, more introspective, and a few months later "Rubber Soul" and "Revolver'!. See DVD "No Direction Home" directed by Martin Scorsese for details...

"Subterranean Homesick Blues"

Johnny's in the basement
Mixing up the medicine.
I'm on the pavement
Thinking about the government.
The man in the trench coat
Badge out, laid off,
Says he's got a bad cough
Wants to get it paid off.
"Look out kid
It's somethin' you did,
God knows when
But you're doin' it again
You better duck down the alley way
Lookin' for a new friend."
The man in the coon-skin cap
And a Bic pen
Wants eleven dollar bills
You only got ten.

Maggie comes, fleet foot,
Face full of black soot,
Talkin' that the Heat put
Plants in the bed, but,
The phone's tapped anyway.
Maggie says "the Many say
They must bust in early May,
Orders from the DA".
"Look out kid,
Don't matter what you did.
God knows when, but you're doin' it again!
Better walk on your tip toes
Don't try, 'No Doz'.
Better stay away from those
That carry around a fire hose.
Keep a clean nose
Watch for Plainclothes,
You don't need a Weatherman
To know which way the wind blows".

Get sick, get well.
Hang around the ink well.
Hang bail, hop tail,
If anything you're going to sell.
Try hard, get barred
Get back, ride rail,
Get jailed, jump bail. Join the army, if you fail.
Look out kid
You're gonna get hit
By losers, cheaters,
Six-time users
Hangin' around the theaters.
Girl by the Whirlpool
Is lookin' for a new fool.
Don't follow leaders.
Watch the parkin' meters.

Ah get born, keep warm
Short pants, romance, learn to dance
Get dressed, get blessed
Try to be a suck-cess.
Please her, please him, buy gifts
Don't steal, don't lift
Twenty years of schoolin'
And they put you on the dayshift.
"Look out kid
They keep it all hid.
Better jump down a manhole
Light yourself a candle
Don't wear sandals
Try to avoid the scandals.
Don't wanna be a bum
You better chew gum".
The pump don't work
'Cause the vandals took the handles.

How that for starting off with a (paranoid) bang? The first rap song about being surveilled in a police state.
the Weatherman faction of the SDS (some 60s anarchists) took thier name from this song!

(and where are those Weathermen, now that we need them... ?)

or how about the heartfelt:
"...She's got everything she needs
she's an artist
She don't look back.
she can take the dark out of the nighttime
and paint the daytime black..."

or the workaday world of:
"...He hands you a nickel,
He hands you a dime,
He askes you with a grin if you're having a good time?
And he fines you every time you slam the door.
I aint gonna work on Maggie Farm no more..."
(have you had bosses like that?)

or the surreal 115th dream:
"I was riding on the Mayflower when I thought I spotted land
I yelled for captain Arab, I'll have you understand,
Who came running to the deck, said 'boys, forget the whale
we're goin over yonder, cut the engines, change the sail' ...

...I think I'll call it 'America' I said as we hit land.
I took a deep breath, I fell down, I could not stand...

...A telephone was ringing, it just about blew my mind,
When I picked it up and said 'Hello', this foot came through the line...

...I repeated that my friends were all in jail with a sigh,
He gave me his card, he said 'call me if they die'..."
I went by a (rich) house with the US flag upon display
I said "could you help me out
I've got some friends down the way?"
He said "get out of here, I'll tear you limb from limb'"
I said,'you know, they refused Jesus, too'
he said 'you're NOT Him'..."

or from It's all Right Ma, I'm only Bleeding:

"...While preachers preach of evil fates
Teachers teach that knowledge waits
Can lead to hundred-dollar plates
Goodness hides behind its gates
But even the president of the United States
Sometimes must have
To stand naked..."

(I can't wait for George W Bush standing naked to be judged by the American people)
Anthony Soprano (the teen) in the last Sopranos episode, listened and comments "there it is, Dylan said it ALL and he did it 40 years ago!"

Now those are lyrics!

Pure poetry, funny, insightful. The sheer volume of Dylan's genius is so overwhelming you can only get it in small amounts - I remember I didn't understand all at first. I still hear new ideas in these songs after all these years. Notes from the Underground.

And the backup band isn't "The Band", as I always thought, it's blues guitar great Michael Bloomfield and Al Kooper, trying to learn organ.

After this brilliant album, Dylan met and influenced the Beatles. The folkies (who had played for years in coffee shops where they learned to play and sing harmony and write meaningful songs) all picked up electric instruments. Country Joe and the Fish, Lovin Spoonful, etc. The Byrds did an electric version of his Pied Piper song "Mr Tambourine Man" ("...take me disappearing through the smoke rings of my mind..."). Then came Donovan's "Sunshine Superman", Vanilla Fudge's "You Keep me Hangin On". After that, there was a sea change in culture and in popular music. There was an explosion.

It started here.
This album cannot be recommended too highly (despite the fact that Dylan doesn't have a singing voice like Jim Morrison or Frank Sinatra).
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
17 of 19 people found the following review helpful
on April 1, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Long having denied the implication that he created the folk-rock genre, rather giving the credit to Gene Clark of The Byrds, this release by the Bard from Hibbing would undoubtedly serve as the cornerstone of folk-rock through the ages! "Bringing It All Back Home" continues Dylan's introspection from "Another Side Of Bob Dylan" while adding electric instruments to the mix (a fact that, for some reason, would be acceptable to fans on record but not live at Newport). Here, Dylan can be at his most romantic one minute, with the Baez-inspired "Love Minus Zero / No Limit" or "She Belongs To Me," and simultaneously prophetic and surreal the next!

Introducing classics like "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" and "Maggie's Farm" alongside concert stalwarts "Gates Of Eden" and "It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)," this release would be the first of a trilogy ended all too soon by Dylan's supposed "motorpsycho nitemare." The other two albums in this trilogy are, of course, "Highway 61 Revisited" and the double-disc "Blonde On Blonde."

Many will say that this is Dylan at his finest, placing the artist into an uncomfortable categorization or time capsule, but he would continue to produce highly creative and innovative work both with The Band and The Traveling Wilburys, as well as via his solo career throughout the 1970's and 80's. "Bringing It All Back Home" merely brings folk-rock to the forefront, introduces his audience to "Another Side Of Bob Dylan," and provides some excellent entertainment for the unsuspecting yet open-minded listener.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
12 of 13 people found the following review helpful
on April 1, 2008
Format: Audio CD
Long having denied the implication that he created the folk-rock genre, rather giving the credit to Gene Clark of The Byrds, this release by the Bard from Hibbing would undoubtedly serve as the cornerstone of folk-rock through the ages! "Bringing It All Back Home" continues Dylan's introspection from "Another Side Of Bob Dylan" while adding electric instruments to the mix (a fact that, for some reason, would be acceptable to fans on record but not live at Newport). Here, Dylan can be at his most romantic one minute, with the Baez-inspired "Love Minus Zero / No Limit" or "She Belongs To Me," and simultaneously prophetic and surreal the next!

Introducing classics like "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue" and "Maggie's Farm" alongside concert stalwarts "Gates Of Eden" and "It's Alright Ma (I'm Only Bleeding)," this release would be the first of a trilogy ended all too soon by Dylan's supposed "motorpsycho nitemare." The other two albums in this trilogy are, of course, "Highway 61 Revisited" and the double-disc "Blonde On Blonde."

Many will say that this is Dylan at his finest, placing the artist into an uncomfortable categorization or time capsule, but he would continue to produce highly creative and innovative work both with The Band and The Traveling Wilburys, as well as via his solo career throughout the 1970's and 80's. "Bringing It All Back Home" merely brings folk-rock to the forefront, introduces his audience to "Another Side Of Bob Dylan," and provides some excellent entertainment for the unsuspecting yet open-minded listener.
11 commentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
11 of 12 people found the following review helpful
on September 17, 2007
Format: Audio CD
Released in 1965, Bringing it All Back Home is a pivotal moment in the history of rock `n' roll, a sparkling jewel in the Bob Dylan catalogue, and one of the greatest albums ever recorded. The record combined the earthy poetics of folk music with the freeform, electrified joys of rock, birthing a whole new sound in the process. The music is by turns gritty, dreamy, propulsive and beautiful, an intoxicating swirl of acoustic and electric, of driving rhythms and rolling melodies. The lyrics are pure poetry, a series of mind-bending verses and stark dreamscapes, a vast mixture of poignancy, humor, anger, and longing. Classic Dylan, if I do say so myself.

In its original (vinyl) incarnation, the record was split right down the middle: Side 1 of the original LP was devoted to amped up, blues-soaked folk-rock, while side 2 featured nothing but acoustic ruminations. Both sides were totally awesome. The electric half featured classics such as "Subterranean Homesick Blues," a hard-drivin' blast of electrified blues-rock boogie, with s rhythm that is pure Chuck Berry. The lyrics are a head-spinning surrealist ramble with some deliciously subtle social commentary and warped character sketches. "Maggie's Farm" is a broken-down protest number with a mutilated honky-tonk vibe. "Outlaw Blues" and "One the Road Again" are gin-soaked ramblers with some fantastically bizarre lyrics, and "Bob Dylan's 115th Dream" is a just-plain hilarious slab of distorted Americana. "She Belongs To Me" and ""Love Minus Zero/No Limit" are gentler numbers, with lilting melodies and nuanced vocals.

The acoustic side is, somehow, even better. "Mr. Tambourine Man" is one of Dylan's most stunningly beautiful songs- it's a dreamy, ethereal reverie with lyrics that ring with love, longing, and nostalgia. It communicates an uncanny amount of emotion, mapping the contours of pain and joy with an unbelievable finesse. And then there's "Gates of Eden," a haunting labyrinth of sound and poetry. The lyrics feature some of Dylan's most striking imagery. "It's Alright Ma, I'm Only Bleeding" is a post-modern protest song, an apocalyptic epic that sees Dylan firing shots at the hollow, materialistic pitfalls of modern life, while his guitar radiates pure tension. Closing out the album is "It's All Over Now, Baby Blue," a rolling ballad that manages to be both mournful and scathing. Nice. So yeah, it's a masterpiece. Get it.
0CommentWas this review helpful to you?YesNoSending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Report abuse
     
 
Customers who viewed this also viewed
Highway 61 Revisited
Highway 61 Revisited by Bob Dylan (Audio CD - 2004)

The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan
The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan by Bob Dylan (Audio CD - 2004)

Blood on the Tracks
Blood on the Tracks by Bob Dylan (Audio CD - 2004)
 
     

Send us feedback

How can we make Amazon Customer Reviews better for you?
Let us know here.

Your Recently Viewed Items and Featured Recommendations 
 

After viewing product detail pages, look here to find an easy way to navigate back to pages you are interested in.