& FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Only 1 left in stock.
Sold by gdyer49359 and Fulfilled by Amazon.
Gift-wrap available.
Britten: Spring Symphony ... has been added to your Cart
+ $3.99 shipping
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by Zoverstocks
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: All Discs are inspected and guaranteed. All dispatched with 1 - 3 working days from the UK
Sell yours for a Gift Card
We'll buy it for up to $0.40
Learn More
Trade in now
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon

Image Unavailable

Image not available for
Color:
  • Britten: Spring Symphony / 5 Flower Songs / Hymn to St. Cecilia, Opp. 27,44,47
  • Sorry, this item is not available in
  • Image not available
  • To view this video download Flash Player
      

Britten: Spring Symphony / 5 Flower Songs / Hymn to St. Cecilia, Opp. 27,44,47


See all formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Audio CD, June 10, 1997
"Please retry"
$7.99
$7.99 $0.98
$7.99 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details Only 1 left in stock. Sold by gdyer49359 and Fulfilled by Amazon. Gift-wrap available.


1. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part 1: Introduction: 'Shine Out, Fair Sun'
2. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part 1: The Merry Cuckoo
3. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part 1: Spring, The Sweet Spring
4. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part 1: The Driving Boy
5. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part 1: The Morning Star
6. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part II: Welcome Maids of Honour
7. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part II: Waters Above
8. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part II: Out On The Lawn I Lie In Bed
9. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part III: When Will My May come
10. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part III: Fair and fair
11. Part III: Sound The Flute
12. Spring Symphony Op. 44: Part IV: Finale: 'London To Thee I Do present'
13. Hymn to St. Cecilia Op. 27: I. 'In A Garden Shady'
14. Hymn to St. Cecilia Op. 27: II. 'I Cannot Grow'
15. Hymn to St. Cecilia Op. 27: IIII. 'O Ear Whose Creatures'
16. Five Flower Songs Op. 47: 1. To Daffodils
17. Five Flower Songs Op. 47: 2. The Succession Of The Four Sweet Months
18. Five Flower Songs Op. 47: 3. Marsh Flowers
19. Five Flower Songs Op. 47: 4. The Evening Primrose
20. Five Flower Songs Op. 47: 5. Ballad Of Green Broom

Product Details

  • Performer: Monteverdi Choir
  • Orchestra: Philharmonia Orchestra
  • Conductor: John Eliot Gardiner
  • Composer: Benjamin Britten
  • Audio CD (June 10, 1997)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Deutsche Grammophon
  • ASIN: B000001GYN
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #228,622 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
50%
4 star
50%
3 star
0%
2 star
0%
1 star
0%
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Harvey on March 31, 2006
Benjamin Britten left England to avoid the conflicts that were brewing in Europe, but living in America, he realized his voice was England's, and so Britten returned to England in the early 1940's realizing it was his home, and a new musical voice arose in him. His music, which up to that point, wholly embraced modernity, now also encompassed the English Nationalist sound as well, creating a distinctive, personal compositional style. The three works on this disk represent choral works after he returned to England: Spring Symphony, Five Flower Songs and Hymn to Saint Cecilia.

The Spring Symphony is scored for large orchestra, numerous percussion, mixed chorus, children's chorus, and soprano, alto, tenor soloists. In four movements, each has subsections describing some aspect of spring. The texts are taken from a wide variety of English poets: W. H. Auden, William Blake, John Milton, Robert Herrick, etc. The first movement (Introduction, Merry Cuckoo, Spring Sweet Spring, The Driving Boy, and The Morning Star) shows the wealth of variety in Britten's imagination. The dissonant opening describes nasty winter (with vibraphone) while the chorus beckons the sun to some out. The Merry Cuckoo, for tenor and accompanied by 3 trumpets, is a fanfare of the opening of spring; while Spring Sweet Spring is an evocation of the coming spring, in dance time, complete with soloist bird calls. The children's chorus sings what could be a folk song it is so upbeat and catchy in a charming description of the Driving Boy, with soprano solo; and the Morning Star hails the coming of spring with chorus and brass alone. The second movement (Welcome Maids of Honor, Waters Above, and Out on the Lawn) is the symphonic equivalent of the slow movement.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By G.D. TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 30, 2012
Verified Purchase
John Eliot Gardiner's DG recording of the War Requiem remains somewhat controversial, I suppose (partially because of the recorded sound). I doubt that many will be very disappointed with his fresh and lively, often crystalline account of the Spring Symphony, however. The approach is refined, light, and glittering, the Philharmonia Orchestra responds impressively, and the Monteverdi Choir is absolutely magnificent (and the Choristers of Salisbury Cathedral are splendid as well). However, although subtlety, color, and transparence are important virtues in this score, some may feel that Gardiner loses a little bit of the misty mystery of the opening.

Still, with such a glorious handling of "Sound the flute" and the wonderfully affirmative finale, to take but two examples, I cannot really imagine anyone failing to warm to this account despite one or two caveats. The soloists are overall good. John Mark Ainsley in particular has a beautiful tone and always conveys the meaning of the text with a sense of deep understanding and conviction (though there may be passages where he sounds a little unsubtle, perhaps mostly because the performance in general is often so subtle and delicate). The female parts (Hagley and Robbin) are very convincingly handled.

As couplings we get a very exquisitely sung and finely balanced Hymn to St. Cecilia, as well as the charming but admittedly slighter Five Flower Songs. In both these a cappella works I am just a little concerned about the recorded sound; while clear and well-balanced it doesn't quite have an ideal bloom. In the main work it works excellently, but the a cappella works sound almost under-nourished. Still, this is a very good release, and even though I cannot claim to have extensive knowledge of the competition it can be rather safely recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Santa Fe Listener HALL OF FAMETOP 1000 REVIEWER on September 23, 2005
The lilting title of "Spring Symphony" is misleading--this is one of Britten's thorniest works, and for me very hard to like. Gardiner gives a good-enough performance, not quite up to Previn's on EMI, which has much better vocal soloists, and nowhere near the composer's own version, wich unfortunately comes in mono only.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Grady Harp HALL OF FAMETOP 100 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on February 1, 2006
John Eliot Gardiner conducts the Philharmonia Orchestra and Chorus of London is three fine works in praise of spring and music in this excellent recording. Not that the initial recording of the magnificent and far too infrequently performed Spring Symphony Opus 44 conducted by Britten himself with a trio of brilliant soloists (now deleted from the recordings available), or the splendid recording of the work (with the Four Sea Interludes from 'Peter Grimes') by Andre Previn, the London Symphony and also a fine trio of soloists will be replaced by this CD, but the variation in approach to this complex work deserves all the recordings possible.

Gardner takes a very transparent approach to the Symphony and the result is a performance of crisp precision and delicacy. The soloists he has selected may not be big names but they each have pliant voices and superb enunciation of the poetry that makes this recording the most understandable of those available. Each of the poems is approached with the care of communication Britten demanded and the result is a captivating performance.

The added pleasure of this CD is the presence of the a capella 'Hymn to St. Cecilia' Op. 27, which again Gardner conducts with maximum effort to clarity of diction and mood. The soloists are excellent. The final offering is, appropriately the a capella choral work Five Flower Songs Op. 47. This type of programming is typical of Gardner's style and the three works together give a perspective of Benjamin Britten's genius not often heard. Highly Recommended. Grady Harp, February 06
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in
 


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?