Brooklyn Castle 2012 PG CC

Amazon Instant Video

(61) IMDb 7.3/10
Available in HD

Imagine a school where the cool kids are the chess team! Welcome to I.S. 318. This irresistibly uplifting doc tells the stories of five members of the chess team at an inner city junior high school that has won more national championships than any other in the country.

Starring:
Rochelle, Justus
Runtime:
1 hour 43 minutes

Available in HD on supported devices.

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Brooklyn Castle

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Product Details

Genres Documentary
Director Katie Dellamaggiore
Starring Rochelle, Justus
Supporting actors Pobo Efekoro, John Galvin, Justus, Patrick, Fred Rubino, Elizabeth Vicary
Studio FilmBuff
MPAA rating PG (Parental Guidance Suggested)
Captions and subtitles English Details
Rental rights 3-day viewing period. Details
Purchase rights Stream instantly and download to 2 locations Details
Format Amazon Instant Video (streaming online video and digital download)

Other Formats

Customer Reviews

4.7 out of 5 stars
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See all 61 customer reviews
The video is very well done, and has some great lessons.
Nicki
They have learned life lessons from this game we call, chess.
Gregory Akers
I saw this documentary last year and fell in love with it.
Glenn Gales

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Gregory Akers on February 10, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I feel that this documentary should be shown in every school from elementary through high school. It shows friendship, teamwork, success, hard work and study. Committed parents and what that does for the children, chess... the challenges of chess. A commited school, "I.S. 318" and what the teachers do for the kids. It shows how this great game, can instill confidence,teach not to give up. If they
lose a game, it is not necessarily the tournament and that there are lesson's to be learned from the losses as well as wins. They learned to help each other, the students & teachers. The kids learned
to participate in the political process to save their own school and team from budget cuts, and to work together to raise funding for the after school program and then to petition the government and
school board for additional funding. They have learned life lessons from this game we call, chess. They all have profitted from their experiences. In fact our Congress of the United States could learn quite a bit from this movie, about real kids, and real life, and maybe, just maybe, they can the see the light and provide additional financial and moral support to our schools and our kids. Possibly, they will learn to feel what it is like to help a kid succeed, and this is much greater than their greed. I am a chess player who really enjoys the game, and undertands its benefits and potential benefits, and I commend all who participated in the production of a movie with "substance" and "value". Most of all I commend the "students", for their leadership, excellence, and enduring commitment to themselves and each other.
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4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By Stormy on February 8, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
This documentary highlights the successful chess program at a Brooklyn middle school. What is powerful truly powerful is seeing the impact of chess on the lives of the young people involved with their school's chess program. The program and it's wonderful teachers truly empower students to work hard and try their best. The students, most of whom live in poverty not only find out the power that they each have but also the power that they have as a group. The documentary also highlights the impact that the economy and budget cuts can have on extracurricular programs such as chess... and ultimately how it could impact the future of our youth.
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10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By M. T. Jennings on February 11, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video
I grew up playing chess under the teaching of several grandmasters. I was ranked 10th in the nation for under 18 when I was younger. When I look back on those days I remember all the great friends I made but I also remember the incredible pressure that was placed on me. The movie does a great job of capturing this pressure. It captures the nervousness of players as well as the excitement and joy of winning. Lots of nostalgia for me in watching this film; however, it is still a great watch for individuals who have never played a game of chess. A great mix of chess and life.
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By C. J. Smith on February 17, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
This movie moved me to tears.

It should required watching for ALL POLITICIANS.

People complain about welfare, crime, and lifetime criminals when the answer is so simple: Give EVERY CHILD A CHANCE TO EXCEL and they WILL.

Yes there are some children that get sucked into bad behavior for various reasons,and the adulation from their outcast peers is more than the far-off possible reward from working hard in school. But the are 100x more children that if given a chance to excel in something, get recognized by caring and patient teachers and administrators, will go on to do not only good things, but great things in life.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By ritendra on February 23, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
it was interesting how they were mixing in trying to deal with budget cuts with the chess movie. some of the people that went there before could try to help the school.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Joel O. Estes on February 21, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
If you love kids and you love learning, watch Brooklyn Castle! If you still believe that teachers make a difference (or even if you don't) watch Brooklyn Castle! If you want a contrary argument for those who say that money doesn't matter, watch Brooklyn Castle! In this age of High Stakes Standardized Testing, this movie gets to the heart of engaged learning for kids. Each of the main characters of this amazing documentary owns their own education. From the national champions, to the struggling novices, to the inspiring teachers and administrators, this is a school that gets what learning should be all about. The amazing thing is that there are several programs in this school that could have been featured. There may not have been the national championships to show, but it appears that most kids in this school are deeply engaged. Believe me - you will regain belief in the human spirit and in the promise of our youth.
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2 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Glenn Gales on February 18, 2013
Format: Amazon Instant Video Verified Purchase
I saw this documentary last year and fell in love with it. The kids are natural born actors and added live to this movie. I mistakenly purchased this dvd from Amazon thinking I would be receiving the regular dvd in the mail, but got it only on my computer.

I plan on purchasing it on dvd that way I can watch it whenever/where-ever I want. It a great movie.

Glenn G.
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Format: DVD
"Brooklyn Castle" is a documentary by Katie Dellamaggiore about the championship junior high school chess team at I.S. 318 in Brooklyn, New York. Over the past decade, the youngsters at I.S. 318 have won more national chess championships than any other school. At I.S. 318, the chess players are the jocks. They even find some social status in this traditionally geeky pursuit. 60% of the student population of I.S. 318 lives below the poverty level, yet the school is academically one of the best in the city. But having an underprivileged student body makes the school particularly dependent on after school programs, whose funding has been cut repeatedly in wake of the financial crisis and lost revenue from the financial sector in New York City. "Brooklyn Castle" looks at the chess team, its mentors, and the threats this successful program faces in the current economic environment.

The film follows a group of chess-playing students in 2009-2010. It seems to start early in 2009 and end in mid-2010, so it covers one-and-a-half school years. We're introduced to John Galvin, the school's vice principle, who serves as a mentor to the team and travels with them to tournaments in addition to his other duties, and to Elizabeth Vicary, the team's chess coach and teacher. Chess seems to be an elective at I.S. 318, which students can take up to 7 times per week. Then we are introduced to 3 young chess players: the #1 player at the school, 8th grader Rochelle, the #2 player, 7th grader Alexis, and the #4 player, 7th grader Pobo. Rochelle is also the under-16 U.S. girl's chess champion. Later, when the next school year begins, Justus, an incoming 6th grader, is added to the group, as well as Patrick, a 7th grader who struggles with ADHD.
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