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5.0 out of 5 stars What we do to the web we do to ourselves
Children learn very early in school that the first people in our land were very serious about being keepers of the earth. I have been teaching a graduate class for teachers concerning the protection of our environment and how we can help our children understand that if we are to survive in this world we have to protect our home, Planet Earth. Children have a very strong...
Published 13 months ago by Carol Poole

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49 of 63 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is a fraud based on a fraud.
Readers of this very popular work should know that it is not what it pretends. Chief Seattle's "speech" as presented by Jeffers is forgery, the real chief Sealth never said anything of the kind. The speech presented here was forged in the 1970s by a Hollywood script writer, and was further altered by Jeffers herself. This book is an insulting white...
Published on January 6, 1999


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49 of 63 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars This book is a fraud based on a fraud., January 6, 1999
By A Customer
Readers of this very popular work should know that it is not what it pretends. Chief Seattle's "speech" as presented by Jeffers is forgery, the real chief Sealth never said anything of the kind. The speech presented here was forged in the 1970s by a Hollywood script writer, and was further altered by Jeffers herself. This book is an insulting white stereotype of real Indians, much like "Dances With Wolves." Even Jeffers' drawings are lies, based on photographs of Plains Indians who in no way resemble the real chief Sealth, who was a portly little fellow. Books like this one do a grave injustice to Native Americans.
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18 of 25 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Truth in Historical Fiction is Imperative!, November 4, 2005
This review is from: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (Hardcover)
All those who are applauding Jeffers for her misguided protrayal of Chief Si'ahl's words should rethink what you are proclaiming. I would be enraged -- as you would -- if I were blatantly misquoted. Perhaps you should be sensitve enough to check out how Native Americans feel about this book on [...] -- or -- clear your facts by reading the website posted by his own people [...] We are doing our children an injustice by continuing to pass on misconceptions as history. I would perfer to give this a 0 star rating but since that was not an option -- I guess the pictures are attractive -- even though the drawing of Chief Si'ahl are actually an exact copy of the Cheyenne Two Moons -- try googling it and you'll see. Oh -- did you notice that the ghost on the last page is carrying a empty cradleboard? I find that appalling.
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29 of 41 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars Another vote for "not accurate", August 14, 2005
By 
Mrs Smith (Portland, Oregon) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (Hardcover)
Text aside, Susan Jeffer's book on Chief Seattle has inaccurate illustrations of historic Northwest Coast tribal costume, dwellings and landscape. I also use this book with my third graders every year - but only to show the kids how some authors have not done adequate research before publishing. There are other great children's books on the subject from lesser known authors and smaller publishers. It may be worth your while to look them up.
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5 of 7 people found the following review helpful
1.0 out of 5 stars A nice TV speech full of Bumper Sticker sentiments., May 2, 2012
By 
Loves Lanikai "Pat" (logan, ut United States) - See all my reviews
This review is from: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (Hardcover)
This wasn't written with the intent to be a fraud. The author, a Texas professor Ted Perry, wrote it in 1971 for Home, a TV movie about ecology. One should note that in the case of 'the thousand rotting buffaloes shot from a train rotting in the sun' that there were no buffalo for maybe a thousand miles from Seattle and there were no trains in the west. The 'speech' in the TV movie was actually a letter from Seattle. It has nothing to do with Seattle, American Native peoples and it is contemporary environmentalist aspirations parading as traditional culture.

There are three main issues about Chief Seattle and his famous "speech." First is the projecting of our beliefs onto indigenous people. The argument that many Native Americans feel this way is spurious -- these words reflect the beliefs of many members of many ethnic groups. "Native American culture is constantly being exploited and appropriated as illustrations of whatever European theory is in fashion," said Jack Forbes, professor of Native American studies at the University of California at Davis. This sentiment has been echoed by many Native American writers such as Ward Churchill and Vine Deloria, Jr. Perry's environmentalist Chief Seattle is a wonderful literary creation, but like Longfellow's Hiawatha it tells us about as much about authentic Native American culture as the film Ben Hur or Shakespeare's Mark Antony tells us about ancient Rome.

A second difficulty is in the appropriation of the voice of Native Americans. In quoting the Perry speech (3) we are simultaneously suppressing the Smith version (1) of Seattle's words. The earlier version of the speech is a heart-rending indictment of American colonialism and abuse of power and its tragic results for the Suquamish people -- a message not nearly as attractive to contemporary environmentalists as the ecological vision of a romanticized, twentieth-century film version of Seattle. When we put our own words into somebody else's mouth, we can no longer hear what they themselves are saying.

The third difficulty with attributing these words to Seattle resides in the appropriation of Perry's voice by his literary character. Ted Perry is the author of these powerful and moving words so perhaps he deserves to be given some public credit. His speech has justifiably inspired environmentalists for nearly three decades -- shouldn't his contribution to the literature of environmentalism be publicly recognized?

the last part is all from [...], an excellent article.
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5.0 out of 5 stars What we do to the web we do to ourselves, February 2, 2014
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This review is from: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (Hardcover)
Children learn very early in school that the first people in our land were very serious about being keepers of the earth. I have been teaching a graduate class for teachers concerning the protection of our environment and how we can help our children understand that if we are to survive in this world we have to protect our home, Planet Earth. Children have a very strong sense of justice at an early age and they know that it is "not fair" to be careless of our environment and perhaps destroy it before others can enjoy it. The words of Chief Seattle, above, remind us that we can be very careless and not protect our world from pollution and waste, or we can be good stewards of our home and save it for future generations.
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6 of 9 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Well written, entirely educational and positively uplifting, January 12, 2010
This review is from: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (Hardcover)
This book was gifted to a classroom of elementary school children. They loved it, we did an entire story time on it, discussed the relationship of people with nature, and if we could put a price tag on the earth and its bounties. It taught the children the importance of our surrounding, our community and how we connect to our world at large, with love, respect and all the good things that we cherish every day. This is a wonderful book to gift, receive, and read time and time again. Beautiful pictures.
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3.0 out of 5 stars Beautifully Illustrated, December 1, 2001
By 
tvtv3 "tvtv3" (St. Louis Metro East Area) - See all my reviews
(VINE VOICE)    (TOP 500 REVIEWER)   
This review is from: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (Hardcover)
The central underlying message of this book is that we are all connected in a very fragile web of life and that any damage done to one part of the web will eventually effect another. Therefore, we should give all living things the honor and respect they deserve. The words of the book are taken and adapted from Chief Seattle's message in Washington, D.C. The message has always been important, but seems more relevant in the more environmentally conscience world in which we live now. However, the illustrations in this book are beautiful and captivating; they add a great deal to the words. Children enjoy the book and understand it's meaning. A nice book.
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7 of 11 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars Irrational Slandering of this Wonderful Book in Customer Reviews, October 5, 2008
By 
This review is from: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (Hardcover)
This is a wonderful, heartfelt story that will present new perspectives on customary ways of perceiving our world. It exposes the boundaries our worldviews are often limited to with regard to authoritarianism and concepts of property, in a way children can understand and find challenging. Unfortunately such perspectives can undermine the status-quo and thus many find them threatening, which explains the many slanderous customer reviews here on Amazon. After doing a little research, I found that the speech presented here has been passed down in several translations and has been added to by various parties over the years, as is the nature of much of history, not that it was "written in the 70's by a Hollywood script writer," etc. There is no reason to believe the central ideas haven't survived. It's disturbing to find the reviewers crying the loudest about this book "teaching lies to children," etc. contain the most blatant lies in their reviews--a lesson in itself. Their histrionics are merely a testament to the power of the ideas expressed in this book.
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1.0 out of 5 stars I am very disappointed on the condition of this book, September 18, 2014
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This review is from: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (Hardcover)
I am very disappointed on the condition of this book. The cover is ruined. The spine is dented and broken. I would not have purchased this book in this condition for approx. $16.00.......it is not worth it. Very, very disappointed. I don't even want to handle it.
Last time I will purchase from this source.
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14 of 22 people found the following review helpful
5.0 out of 5 stars There are sources to back up the content!, September 30, 2003
By 
This review is from: Brother Eagle, Sister Sky (Hardcover)
I wrote my review before reading other reviews here on Amazon. After reading reviews questioning the authenticity of the content of this book, I did an Internet search for factual information. A source at the National Archives and Records Association of the USA shows an article by Jerry Clark, which contains information to support the text of this picture book by Susan Jeffers. That article is footnoted with references to source material. There is apparently a huge debate over the authenticity of what Chief Seattle did or did not say. Because I found information to support the content of this book, I will go ahead and do a review and grant it 5 stars for the eloquent text and beautiful illustrations.
Text is based on an adaptation of a speech made by Native American Chief Seattle to the new Commissioner of Indian Affairs, during negotiations between the white settlers and the Suquamish and Duwanish tribes in the 1850s. The speech tells of the views held by the ancient peoples, such as humans cannot own land or air or water. The sacredness of the earth and all of its' inhabitants is explained. The connectedness of the human Native Americans to the Earth is eloquently described. This speech is a plea that if they sell the land to the white men, that the land and animals not be ruined. This message is thought to be the first plea and a forewarning of ecology, as Chief Seattle pleas that the land be preserved for the enjoyment of future generations.
The first and last pages (an unlabeled introduction and an unlabeled afterward) are factual and historical explanations to explain the body of the text. The text itself is a wonderful and poetically written explanation of the views of the Native Americans. If one wishes to explain these beliefs to a child without getting into the historical elements, simply skip the introduction and the afterward, which may be recommended for reading to the very young who are not yet ready to grasp historical facts and concepts. (My three year old was enthralled with this book, and I think even a two year old would be interested in the main text.)
The illustrations are stunning and detailed and are difficult to describe. Very high quality writing and gorgeous illustrations, not to be missed!
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Brother Eagle, Sister Sky
Brother Eagle, Sister Sky by Chief Seattle (Hardcover - September 2, 1991)
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