Qty:1
  • List Price: $37.95
  • Save: $4.64 (12%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 4 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Sold by BookBusterz
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Aside from a few usual library marks and nicely applied laminate covering, this ex issue in paperback is bright, clean and free from other imperfections with very light shelf wear at the bottom edge.
Trade in your item
Get a $8.52
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Brothers in Clay: The Story of Georgia Folk Pottery Paperback – September 15, 2008


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$37.50
Paperback
"Please retry"
$33.31
$29.79 $25.95


Frequently Bought Together

Brothers in Clay: The Story of Georgia Folk Pottery + From Mud to Jug: The Folk Potters and Pottery of Northeast Georgia + Carolina Clay: The Life and Legend of the Slave Potter Dave
Price for all three: $76.30

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Fall Project Resources in Crafts, Hobbies & Home
Preserve fruits and vegetables, redecorate the home, or start a crafts project with help from books in the Fall Inspiration store.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 376 pages
  • Publisher: University of Georgia Press; Reprint edition (September 15, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0820332208
  • ISBN-13: 978-0820332208
  • Product Dimensions: 10.2 x 8.3 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (5 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #927,894 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"Beautifully designed, well written and illustrated, and comprehensive in scope, Brothers in Clay should stand for years to come as the definitive volume on Georgia's exciting and diverse pottery traditions. It also sets a standard for state surveys that future studies will have to work hard to equal."--Journal of American Folklore


"Remarkably complete in its coverage . . . Burrison combines interviews with historic evidence to write a flowing narrative spiced with brilliant photographs and effective illustrations.”--Choice


"A fascinating book—a sort of living history . . . This book is a fitting tribute to the Georgia folk pottery movement.”--Christian Science Monitor


"The first extensive study of a once-prominent part of the state's culture."--Atlanta Journal-Constitution


"Burrison's beautiful book . . . [is] more than an ordinary history; it is a complete study in folklife and material culture."--Western Folklore


"[An] exhaustive study of Georgia's pottery dynasties."--Southern Living


"Combines the popular appeal of a Foxfire volume with the painstaking academic care of the scholarly monograph."--Southern Exposure


"A pioneering work . . . Burrison has provided a remarkably rich and full homage to some 400 Georgia potters. Above all, he has delineated a true, living craft."--Material Culture

About the Author

John A. Burrison is a professor of English and director of the folklore curriculum at Georgia State University. His other books include Storytellers: Folktales and Legends from the South and Shaping Traditions: Folk Art in a Changing South (both Georgia).

More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
4
4 star
0
3 star
0
2 star
1
1 star
0
See all 5 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a book that clearly describes and provides images of the early recognition of folk pottery in a very effective way.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Joan T. on October 11, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Bought the book since my great grandfather and his brothers operated a pottery factory along the Chattahoochee River in Georgia before the Civil War and I have a pottery shard found at the site. Just wanted to know more about Georgia folk pottery and guess what! Great grandfather was mentioned by name. What a delight!
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Brothers in Clay is honestly so well written and so comprehensive .... it should be on every potter's shelf particularly if you are interested in older pottery or face jugs .... or even as a historical reference.... Living in the Pottery trails of North Ga.... I found this to be an easy read and very engaging..... I feel like I know more about my art and far more about the history of this magical area.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
2 of 4 people found the following review helpful By R Russell on January 28, 2007
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Excellent book covering the great folk potters of Geogia -All I hoped it would be.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 18 people found the following review helpful By David Russell on April 19, 2006
Format: Paperback
The first thing that you will need to know about the author, if indeed personal perspectives are important, is that, unless the situation in which he finds himself is self-laudatory, he becomes....boorish. His work is no doubt ground breaking, but he leaves out so much of the ceramic history of Georgia because it would take too much effort to really uncover the truth. For example, one will see much that he has to offer for those potteries that existed above the fault line in Georgia. But, he fails to recognize equally important potteries in South Georgia. Try to find any relevant information about Lanier County, or the area around Lumpkin. Or, more damning, try to find any relevant information in this book about Washington County, probably the earliest pottery center in Georgia. Yes, Burrison does give WACO a passing notice; however, he skims details with the proviso that "more studies need to be done". Instead, Burrison rides the coattails of his protege', Lanier Meaders, who is indeed a worthy beast of burden, and very popular right now with the collector set. Still, the holes in his research are ragged, and we are expected to accept this with the admonition that more will come, later. I believe that as a researcher, Burrison relies on the obvious; that he used his assistants to provide details, and that, in general, as someone who promotes himself to be the primary source of expertise concerning Georgia pottery, he is "not authentic". And so, if you would like what seems to be a well-researched examination of Georgia pottery, but in fact is just a biased snapshot of it, then buy this book. In the meantime, the hope is that someone will take up the fallen mantel of Burrison's book and reveal a complete picture of a fascinating subject.
1 Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?