Buy New
$10.86
Qty:1
  • List Price: $16.00
  • Save: $5.14 (32%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Tom Brown's Field Guide to City and Suburban Survival Paperback – March 15, 1986


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback
"Please retry"
$10.86
$7.61 $5.78
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Tom Brown's Field Guide to City and Suburban Survival + Tom Brown's Field Guide to Wilderness Survival + Tom Brown's Guide to Wild Edible and Medicinal Plants (Field Guide)
Price for all three: $37.27

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Series: Field Guide (Book 3)
  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Berkley Trade; Reprint edition (March 15, 1986)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0425091724
  • ISBN-13: 978-0425091722
  • Product Dimensions: 6 x 0.8 x 9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 9.6 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (25 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #265,722 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Tom Brown, Jr. began to learn hunting and tracking at the age of eight under the tutelage of an Apache elder, medicine man, and scout in Toms River, New Jersey, and is the author of 16 books on nature. Recently, he was the technical advisor on The Hunted, a major motion picture starring Tommy Lee Jones and Benecio Del Toro.   In 1978, Tom founded the Tracker School in the New Jersey Pine Barrens where he offers more than 25 classes about wilderness survival and environmental protection.


More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Tom Brown Jr. is brilliant.
G. L. from up North.
Very practical guide on how to survive real life situations.
Pickyreader
No picture to identify the vegetation.
Donald Compton

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

57 of 59 people found the following review helpful By Sam Adams on September 19, 2008
Format: Paperback
The purpose behind this book differs significantly from Cory Lundin's When All Hell Breaks Loose, which I previously reviewed, even though both books are concerned with survival within a city. Whereas Lundin focused on post-disaster survival -- mainly within the confines of your home and backyard and dependent upon your own resources -- Tom Brown differs in that he imagines the reader needing to survive a personal emergency, with the rest of the city essentially unaffected. He allows, therefore, that you may have uninvited access to city resources outside your home, such as water and shelter in public areas, and restaurant or grocery store dumpsters for food.

He schools the reader in the basics of how electricity and water are supplied in a city and how they move within a house. An entire chapter is devoted to how weather occurs. Avoiding an emergency is as much his intent as surviving one. It is not till the end of the book that he discusses disasters and how to deal with them. Unlike Lundin, Brown briefly shows a debris hut, fire by friction, and a few traps.

Chapter titles: Introduction, Shelter, Water, Heat and Light, Food, Crime, Weather, Disasters, Enjoying the City. Appendices: Common Urban Edibles, Common Urban Animals, Survival Supplies.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
22 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on July 23, 2001
Format: Paperback
Where to get food, water, shelter in the city? What happens when there's a disaster? This book is a decent start. Lots of helpful chapters on how to get the essentials, as well as what common edible plants grow in the city.
Another food-for-thought thing you can read is the chapter in Way of the Scout (also by Brown) on his first solo trip to New York City.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
29 of 33 people found the following review helpful By Mark Fellows on September 10, 2010
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I believe the Author tries to cut bad review off at the pass by writing something like "I am prepared to take critcism from the arm chair survivalist" So, we don't want to be tagged as the "Arm Chair Survivalist" so we don't complain.

However, this book is not worth the money. There are some tips worth thinking about like, building a smaller shelter in your house in an emergency to more easily heat your living quarters, and placing the opening toward the south side window to get natural heat. However, this principle applies to ANY outdoor shelter in the winter, so if you use a little common sense, along with your knowledge of building outdoors shelters, you can figure this out on your own.

The book does not cover techniques on blending into the city in a disaster so you can move more freely to get resources. He discussed getting food out of dumpsters, but says to watch the restaurant to see what gets dumped and when. However, in a disaster, you wouldn't have restaurants doing business as usual, so that advice is worthless, unless you want to spend some time BEFORE a disaster watching the city and finding out a little about the under workings. Of course, the only people that will do this, are extremists. Useless to a middle class family man.

His description of water systems is not very helpful either. He misses a big link in his general description of how water flows into a city, and that is the water tower. These towers are almost always around, and the reason is, you need a big, high reservoir to meet water pressure demands of a city that uses water resources at roughly the same time, in the morning before work, and after getting home, and taking showers, and cooking.
Read more ›
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 22 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on August 2, 1996
Format: Paperback
Was not based on a survival aspect as much as a preparation
aspect, but was still good anyway.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By J. Detgen on July 1, 2008
Format: Paperback
This book is a great guide to being prepared for natural disasters in any city or suburb. Much of the content is techniques for wilderness survival that have been adapted for what you find in the city. One thing that you don't find in a wilderness survival guide is crime prevention, which is approached well in this book.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Nancy Overton on September 1, 2009
Format: Paperback
I love Tom Brown's approach to survival: it's just a real practical, methodical look at basic human needs. Tom doesn't get excited. He just knows a lot of stuff that you should know that he's willing to share. He takes all his tracking and survival skills from the woods and turns them into street smarts for you and me. I may never build a snare trap in the city, but I'm glad to know ten ways to keep warm, six ways to build a shelter and three ways to distill questionable drinking water.

There are chapters on food, water, light, crime, weather and disasters. I keep this book in my "To-Go" bag.

Nancy Overton is the author of "A Checklist/ Making a Family Plan for Emergencies".
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By David on April 29, 2012
Format: Paperback
This book doesn't cover everything. What book does? The most important survival tool you have is your intuition- and you develop this by asking questions, just like Tom teaches. The only really good book I've read on that is Quantum Power Questions. Asking useful questions may be the heart of survival. I have done several courses with Tom, which I have to say were far, far better than anything the military offers. I met a former Air Force survival course instructor, who told me that what Brown taught in the first course- the Standard- a week long- taught him more than he learned in his instructors course in the Air Force, which lasted 6 months. I met an instructor from the SERE course, at a Brown training, he was smart enough to be out improving himself. Tom calls himself a "coyote teacher", and is somewhat incomprehensible at times, and at other times is strikingly lucid, with a great message. Yes, he has an ego, but who doesn't. He reminds me a bit of Crocodile Dundee- some great skills, mixed with a little BS. No teacher knows everything. Journey to the Ancestral Self: The Native Lifeway Guide to Living in Harmony with the Earth Mother (Bk.1) was written by a former instructor at Brown's school, and it fleshes out some of what Brown says. Shadow Strategies of an American Ninja Master also covers information that would be useful, as you expand your skills.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?