Bruce Springsteen and Philosophy: Darkness on the Edge of... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Qty:1
  • List Price: $18.95
  • Save: $4.32 (23%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Only 2 left in stock (more on the way).
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Very Good | Details
Condition: Used: Very Good
Comment: Excellent copy! Cover has most minor shelf/handling wear making it "just less than perfect/new." Eligible for PRIME & Super Saver Shipping. Ships promptly with secure packaging and order tracking. Prompt and courteous customer service. Serving the Amazon.com marketplace and earning trust and positive feedback since 2009.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Bruce Springsteen and Philosophy: Darkness on the Edge of Truth (Popular Culture and Philosophy) Paperback – April 28, 2008


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Paperback
"Please retry"
$14.63
$6.95 $1.98
Best%20Books%20of%202014


Frequently Bought Together

Bruce Springsteen and Philosophy: Darkness on the Edge of Truth (Popular Culture and Philosophy) + Reading the Boss: Interdisciplinary Approaches to the Works of Bruce Springsteen + Springsteen on Springsteen: Interviews, Speeches, and Encounters (Musicians in Their Own Words)
Price for all three: $69.32

Buy the selected items together
NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Year
Best Books of 2014
Looking for something great to read? Browse our editors' picks for 2014's Best Books of the Year in fiction, nonfiction, mysteries, children's books, and much more.

Product Details

  • Series: Popular Culture and Philosophy (Book 32)
  • Paperback: 288 pages
  • Publisher: Open Court (April 28, 2008)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812696476
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812696479
  • Product Dimensions: 8.9 x 6 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,231,750 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Author

Steven Michels is associate professor of political science at Sacred Heart University in Fairfield, CT.

In addition to The Case against Democracy, his first book, he's the author of a number of articles and chapters on politics and culture, including "Can The Daily Show Save Democracy?" in The Daily Show and Philosophy (with Mike Ventimiglia), "Religion, Rhetoric, and Running for Office: Public Reason on the Campaign Trail" (with Brian Stiltner) in Religious Voices in Public Places, and "Who's the Boss? Springsteen on the Alienation and Salvation of Work and Labor" in Bruce Springsteen and Philosophy.

He lives in New York City.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By John H. Teeple on July 5, 2008
Format: Paperback
I've read (at least parts of) several of the titles in the "Popular culture and philosophy" series; unfortunately, despite the general value of this sort of work, the series is very uneven. This title, I am glad to say, being both an armchair philosopher and a semi-professional Bruce Springsteen fan, is among the best entries.

The best feature of this book is that each of the authors (among the chapters I have read so far) takes Bruce seriously as what he is: a rock n' roll musician and contemporary poet. There is no attempt to make Bruce into something he is not (this point is clearly made in the first chapter). Instead, the authors stay true to the themes and issues that Bruce himself explores in his songs. In contrast to many of the other books in the series, for example, there are no chapters concerning how Bruce does (or does not) capture some element of Plato's theory of knowledge. There are, however, chapters on the nature of work and labor, the importance of human connection, the nature of freedom, and the possibility of redemption. Anyone familiar with Bruce's music will recognize these themes in his lyrics and choice of material. These themes are, moreover, profoundly philosophical, regardless of whether Bruce's explorations are as 'deep' as those of professional philosophers. (Although I would insist, as do many of the authors, that Bruce's music, in a sense, has greater depth than any philosophical treatise could achieve.)

This book is also notable, among the "Popular culture" series, for its list of contributors, which includes several prominent interpreters of classic and modern American philosophy (particularly the pragmatist tradition). This list includes: Randall Auxier and Doug Anderson (editors and contributors), John Shook, and Scott Pratt.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By Brian Bajzek on August 17, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
I am a massive philosophy nerd, and I also happen to love Bruce Springsteen with a borderline troubling devotion, so when this book was recommended to me by a friend who also meets both of these qualifications, I suspected I was in for a treat. Thankfully, I have not been disappointed.

As one might expect, these are not especially technical, dense, or earth-shatteringly provocative essays, but I don't necessarily need or want a book lise this to exhibit those qualities, so I appreciate how readable and entertaining most of the prose in "Bruce Springsteen and Philosophy" is. The essays can be enjoyed separately as fun, bite-sized reflections on the philosophical implications of The Boss's work, or--if you're like me--you can binge on as many successive essays as your schedule will allow. Highly recommended.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
Format: Paperback
Libraries strong in either philosophy or popular music - or both - will welcome Bruce Springsteen and Philosophy, a guide to Springsteen's music linking lyrics with modern philosophy. Here eighteen Springsteen fans who are also philosophy buffs offer their survey of topics ranging from the musician's concept of the soul to 'fatalism' in one of his songs.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Nancy on September 23, 2011
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
Let me begin by saying I LOVE BRUCE SPRINGSTEEN! I think he has SO much to say and he says it SO WELL, also, I like to ponder philosophy, and the human condition. I was totally psyched that someone had listened to Bruce's musical poetry and had analyzed it, I was really looking forward to reading this book. What. A. Total. Disappointment. Every bit of joy, all the yearning to be free, has been sucked out of every song reviewed. There are a couple of cute phrases, I'll give the book that, I keep trying to read it and keep being disappointed. an example:

Rene Descartes (1596-1650) was probably the most unrelenting critic of imagination who ever lived; he was ingenious, and he looked just like Captain Cook. He had lots of rational arguments, but one was especially effective at proving that there was a difference between thinking about something and imagining it. He instructed us to think about a figure with exactly a thousand sides of equal length. He called this a chiliagon.

The preceding sentence is part of several paragraphs cogitating on the meaning of "Born To Run."

The whole book is like this. I love Bruce Springsteen, and I will probably finish this book, but man, this book rips the bones from your back, it's a suicide rap. Skip it.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again