Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Brush Up Your Shakespeare!: An Infectious Tour Through the Most Famous and Quotable Words and Phrases from the Bard Paperback – January 5, 2000


Amazon Price New from Used from
Paperback, January 5, 2000
"Please retry"
$12.00 $0.01

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Hero Quick Promo
Browse in Books with Buzz and explore more details on selected titles, including the current pick, "The Good Girl" by Mary Kubica.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 272 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Paperbacks; 1 Sub edition (January 5, 2000)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062737325
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062737328
  • Product Dimensions: 7.2 x 5.2 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 7.2 ounces
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #394,004 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

"This is the perfect way to sound great at academic cocktail parties....A painless and fun way to broaden your knowledge." -- -- Dallas Morning News

About the Author

Michael Macrone is the author of nine entertain-ing guides to literary and intellectual history.His specialties include the Shakespeare canon, classical writings, mythology, the Bible, and great ideas.He lives in San Francisco, California.

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
5 star
3
4 star
1
3 star
0
2 star
0
1 star
0
See all 4 customer reviews
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

11 of 11 people found the following review helpful By tepi on June 7, 2001
BRUSH UP YOUR SHAKESPEARE. By Michael Macrone. With Illustrations by Tom Lulevitch. 235 pp. New York : Harper Perennial, 1990 and Reprinted.
There are many possible approaches to Shakespeare, and in the present book Macrone has hit on the new and interesting idea of giving us, not yet another standard anthology or ponderous critical study, but a lighthearted "tour through the most famous and quotable words and phrases from the bard."
Macrone writes : "We're here to give you a handle on the famous lines you already know are Shakespeare's, and to alert you to our quieter, less conspicuous borrowings. . . . In the meantime, you'll be offered an incidental introduction (or reintroduction) to famous passages, concisely explained. . . ." (page xii).
In other words, to paraphrase Moth in 'Love's Labor's Lost' - 'He hath been at a great feast of language, and stol'n the scraps.' The main body of the book - 'THE QUOTABLE AND THE NOTABLE : Famous Phrases from Shakespeare' - gives us well over one hundred of these glorious 'scraps,' scraps such as Othello's :
"My story being done, / She gave me for my pains a world of sighs; / She swore, in faith 'twas strange, 'twas passing strange; / 'Twas pitiful, 'twas wondrous pitiful. / She wished she had not heard it, yet she wished / That heaven had made her such a man" (page 108). Each of the passages, which have been kept "as short as possible ... while still providing enough of the context to make the key phrase intelligible" (page xiii), has been chosen to highlight an original usage of Shakespeare - in this case "passing strange" - usages which seem to have set the course of the English language.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
7 of 7 people found the following review helpful By Rebecca of Amazon HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on September 5, 2001
Buy and Keep this book only for thee!

The perfect size book to keep with you to brush up on your Shakespeare. A unique list of illustrations is followed by "At First Brush," which helps you to dive right in to subjects such as: Spelling and punctuation, organization and dating (A list of plays and dates, with revision noted).

The second section is called: The Quotable and the Notable. This area is a larger section devoted to famous phrases. Each phrase is followed by a small paragraph to give explanations and background for say...how Shakespeare wanted the actor to express the phrases. These sections are filled with tidbits worth reading and also help to "set the stage" or point to where the phrase is used in the play.

"King Lear has cut a deal with the two more flattering of his three daughters: he will turn power over to them as long as he can keep the name and respect due to a king......" pg. 131

"How sharper than a serpent's tooth it is
To have a thankless child!" then makes more
sense after we understand that his "snakelike daughters
represent a quality he feels all women possess."

The section on Household Words explains common and uncommon words coined by Shakespeare. Here the author lists a partial list of words for which Shakespeare is said to be the first authority according to the Oxford English Dictionary. "well-read" is in this list. ;>

Faux Shakespeare is a list of phrases often misattributed to Shakespeare. So, who really said: "Fool's Paradise?" It is interesting how "I wold not be in a flis paradyce." turns up in Love's Labor's Lost and Romeo and Juliet.

Good Enough to Call Your Own is a list of titles borrowed from Shakespeare and many a catchy phrase has turned into a title.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By Julianne on July 2, 2000
I wasn't all that sure until I read "Brush Up On Your Shakespeare" by Michael Macrone. Did you know that "Such stuff as dreams are made on" is from The Tempest, spoken by Prospero? Or "Wild goose chase" was said by Mercutio in Romeo and Juliet? Well, now you do! This guide to William Shakespeare's most famous words and classic phrases are now in one entertaining guide. Listed by the phrases themselves, with in-depth explanations as to its original meaning and how it was used back in its time. Macrone also includes in the back, some "Household Words" coined by the famous Bard and "Faux Shakespeare: Phrases Often Misattributed to Shakespeare".
People have used these expressions in everyday interactions as well as in the media. The book is even sprinkled with delightful illustrations by Tom Lulevitch. This guide is an easy way to learn a bit more about Shakespeare, for just about anyone.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By devi on January 17, 2014
Verified Purchase
Love the ins and outs Macrone gives to the quotes we all know so well. I would recommend this to anyone who wants a lighthearted Shakespeare study.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Search

What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?