Your Music Library
  MP3 cart

Budakhan Mindphone

March 1, 1999

See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
MP3 Music
"Please retry"
$6.93
$6.93
More options
  • Sample this album Title (Sample)
1
30
5:31
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
2
30
4:53
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
3
30
4:25
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
4
30
3:08
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
5
30
3:32
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
6
30
4:09
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart
7
30
4:49
Play in Library $0.99 In MP3 cart View MP3 Cart

Product Details

  • Original Release Date: March 1, 1999
  • Label: Warp Records
  • Copyright: 1999 Warp Records Limited
  • Total Length: 30:27
  • Genres:
  • ASIN: B001E3YA9Y
  • Average Customer Review: 4.0 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (13 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #205,685 Paid in Albums (See Top 100 Paid in Albums)

Customer Reviews

4.0 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on April 5, 1999
Format: Audio CD
It seems Mr. Jenkinson did things backwards. This mini-album would have been a nice segue from "Big Loada" to "Music Is Rotted One Note." As it is, "Music . ." came out first and was quite a jarring contrast. I've tried to give "Music . ." a chance, and can honestly say I like it a lot, although it's not nearly as enjoyable per se as "Big Loada."
That's where "Budakhan Mindphone" beats the previous ablum hands down. It still retains the experimental jazz touches ("The Tide," "Gong Acid,") but most of the tracks mingle the noodling with a strong beat and some very nice melodies.
The best tracks here, "Iambic 5 Poetry," "Fly Street," and "Varkotope" rank with the best TJ has released. The rest is solid. All in all, a very tasty release, and probably the one I would recommend to the curious.
This album and the original UK "Big Loada" make nice arguments for 'mini-albums' in general. You don't have to set aside a full hour of your time to digest them, and yet you still get a full range of the Squarepusher sound. I'd rather pay $8-9 for a good 30 minute release than $14+ for a mind-numbing 75 minutes. "Budakhan Mindphone" pulls the double coup of being high quality and the right length. Dandy.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By braindata on March 5, 2002
Format: Audio CD
"Iambic 5 Poetry" is sheer beauty. It IS the standout track, and at first I thought it was going to be the only one. This mini-album takes several listens to get engrossed and to appreciate all that it offers. At this stage, I can say that I'm thoroughly satisfied with this album. It uses some of the more accoustic jazz style of Music Is Rotted One Note, but this time it's less dark in tone. In fact, it's rather uplifting. There is more electronic sequencing involved here, but it is quite subtle in its execution.
The aforementioned track is the big melody track. Others are more experimental and free-form in nature, but easy to enjoy and complement the overall feel of the mini-album.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 2, 1999
Format: Audio CD
One first listen, "Budakhan Mindphone" seems to be seven tracks that didn't make it onto "Music Is Rotted One Note." Indeed, the album focuses on Mr. Jenkinson's latest trend in producing purely experimental jazz. However, I feel that the tracks included on this album have a tighter structure and can actually be considered 'songs,' as opposed to "Rotted"'s jazz experiments. The two tracks that stand out are "Iambic 5 Poetry" and "Two Bass Hit (Dub)." "Iambic" is rather dim and brooding, with emphasis on string progression and a continuing groove. In two words, I'd describe it as "Funeral Jazz." "Two Bass Hit (Dub)" is exactly that: it sounds as if two bassists totally oblivious to each other are jamming along with a common drummer. This makes for much harmony as well as dissonance. In short, expect up-tempo jazz, not wacky (but absolutely brilliant) breaks that can be found in "Feed Me Weird Things" or "Hard Normal Daddy."
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 14, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Although some previous reviews have claimed that Budakhan Mindphone is really Music is Rotten One Note part II, I really cannot agree. Although B.M. certainly takes a large cue from Music Is Rotted One Note, it also brings back some of the beats of Big Loada and Hard Normal Daddy, although admittedly in a strange new form. Iambic 5 poetry is a very pretty song that is reminiscent of Tortoise; Two Bass Hit is a lopsided bass jam; and Fly Street and Varkatope hearken back to older Squarepusher sounds, while retaining the strange minimalism of more recent Squarepusher efforts. I could do without the tunelessness of The Tide and Gong Acid, but the tuneful-to-tuneless ratio here is much higher than on Music Is Rotted One Note, thus providing a more enjoyable listening experience. This is the sound of Mr. Jenkinson beginning to reconcile the old-school Squarepusher drill 'n' bass sound with the free jazz of his last effort, and it is a worthwhile excursion.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on March 3, 1999
Format: Audio CD
Very much akin to Mr. Jenkinson's last dive into acid jazz fusion, 'Music is Rotted One Note', Squarepusher has yet again returned to the seemingly lo-fi jazz statement against drum n bass in 'Budakhan Mindphone'. The last album was hailed as genius by some and a triffle by others, and this mini album will definitely garner the same reviews by critics: divided. Though some of this disc does delve back into the world of drum n bass for short sections, some of the songs get monotonous and weighed down by the jazz touch (the final song 'Gong Acid' for instance is a trail of percussion hits). My personal favorite track on here is 'Two Bass Hit'. If you enjoyed Jenkinson's last excursion, then this is the disc for you and if this is your first time listening to Squarepusher's latest material, this may be a cheap sampler to his full length release.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
By bl6r on March 15, 2010
Format: MP3 Music Verified Purchase
Electronic music has come a long way in its development over the years. By incorporating technology and every other genre, new and old, it has created its own unique footprint in the music industry. In search of an album worth reviewing, I settled on Squarepusher's Budakhan Mindphone. Though short and sweet, this album speaks volumes with its "less is more" attitude in its composition.
Budakhan Mindphone is relatively experimental and abstract compared to your typical electronica. It starts out with "Iambic 5 Poetry," an acid-y piece with an easy-to-follow thought process with a light melody and steady progressing percussion, sprinkled with a slight and subtle reference to funk on the bass. A texturally more intricate "Fly Street" aids in the evolution of the album from something like "Iambic 5 Poetry" to a much more structurally abstract "Gong Acid." It has some structural similarities to Cujo's "Traffic" from Adventures in Foam. Next, the album leads to "The Tide," an ambient and percussive cloud-like piece with what sounds like a hi hat leading the whole way through.
Percussion is the main driving force of the album, but not in the traditional sense. Percussion is used to develop a narrative by building in layers, as in "Varkatope," "Splask," and "Gong Acid," leading to texturally complex music. In "Two Bass Hit" what seems like a snare and hi hat keep time to leave the basses to develop their own polyphonic and competing melodies. The bass is also used a in its usual percussive role in "Iambic 5 Poetry" and "Varkatope." While some of the pieces are bass-heavy, like "Two Bass Hit," just about all the pieces showcase the bass in some form or another.
The electronic presence is profound throughout the album and thought provoking.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews


What Other Items Do Customers Buy After Viewing This Item?


Look for Similar Items by Category