Buy New
$44.96
Qty:1
  • List Price: $49.95
  • Save: $4.99 (10%)
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Buddhist Phenomenology: A... has been added to your Cart
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Buddhist Phenomenology: A Philosophical Investigation of Yogacara Buddhism and the Ch'eng Wei-shih Lun (Routledge Critical Studies in Buddhism) Paperback – January 8, 2003


See all 4 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Rent from
$11.75
Paperback
"Please retry"
$44.96
$41.94 $54.77


Frequently Bought Together

Buddhist Phenomenology: A Philosophical Investigation of Yogacara Buddhism and the Ch'eng Wei-shih Lun (Routledge Critical Studies in Buddhism) + The Buddhist Unconscious: The Alaya-vijñana in the context of Indian Buddhist Thought (Routledge Critical Studies in Buddhism) + Living Yogacara: An Introduction to Consciousness-Only Buddhism
Price for all three: $104.24

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE
Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Series: Routledge Critical Studies in Buddhism
  • Paperback: 632 pages
  • Publisher: Routledge (January 8, 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0415406102
  • ISBN-13: 978-0415406109
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.3 x 1.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 2.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (4 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,213,580 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

'A well-researched and lucid exposition of an old Buddhist school of thought that is usually seen as hopelessly complex and difficult' - Bibliographia Missionaria

'His unique approach ... both in content and style, may be the most formidable aspect of this discursive, incisive, often brilliant, 600 page work.' - H-Buddhism, H-Net Reviews

About the Author

Dan Lusthaus. Florida State University --This text refers to the Hardcover edition.

Customer Reviews

3.8 out of 5 stars
Share your thoughts with other customers

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

38 of 39 people found the following review helpful By A. C. Muller on June 13, 2009
Format: Paperback
Western students of Yogacara Buddhism have long been in need of full-length work that analyzes the key Yogacara problematic concepts in a comprehensive manner. Due to the lack of such a text, many non-specialists have been forced to rely on the accounts provided in reference and survey works, which have tended to offer vague and confusing interpretations of what the tradition actually represents. In writing Buddhist Phenomenology, Dan Lusthaus has provided us with the most comprehensive and coherent response to these needs seen in recent years. Having spent decades reading descriptions of the school written by both classical and modern scholars that he considers to have missed the point in one way or another, the aim of his writing of Buddhist Phenomenology is to set the meaning of Yogacara straight. In so doing, he provides a re-articulation of Yogacara that amounts to a must-read for anyone with an interest in this seminal Buddhist system.
2 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 25 people found the following review helpful By Andre Doshim Halaw on June 3, 2012
Format: Paperback
Arguably, there is no facet of Buddhism more misunderstood than Yogacara. Contrary to popular belief, among both scholars and Buddhists alike, Yogacara is not a form of idealism. The 'mind-only' label attached to Yogacara is a misnomer, especially when held against a Western philosophical backdrop. If you're at all interested in what Yogacara Buddhism really is, then pick up a copy of Dan Lusthaus's Buddhist Phenomenology.

Dense, monolithic, dizzying, and masterfully executed, Buddhist Phenomenology is a massive tome of scholarship. By no means is it an easy read, nor should it be, for Dan Lusthaus is a preeminent expert in Yogacara, a complicated and highly influential system of Buddhist thought. The book is nothing short of flawlessly thorough in every detail. Honestly, I am shocked that any single human being could know so much about one subject. It's beyond impressive.

So if Yogacara isn't a form of idealism, what exactly is it? If you've ever read a Yogacara or hybrid-Yogacara text like the Lankavatara Sutra, you'll remember there's a lot of mention of 'mind-only'; according to Lusthaus, this is not a denial of external reality, but rather a recognition that all experience occurs within consciousness. For this reason, he identifies Yogacara as a type of phenomenology a la Edmund Husserl. Lusthaus's primary text of reference is the Ch'eng Wei-Shih lun, written in the 7th century CE by the Chinese monk Hsuan-tsang.

Yogacara, like its also-Indian cousin Madhyamaka, is not interested in asserting any ontological statement about reality. What it is interested in is waking people up; it does this by attacking our attachments, namely the human propensity to objectify (or to use Lusthaus's term, "appropriate") reality.
Read more ›
14 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
1 of 2 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on February 15, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Spiritual progress is becoming aware of the bubble of that immense structure through which we live interpreting the world. Man is the thinking animal and his strength is his immense capacity of imagination. With his large brain he is able to construct great dimensions filled with interconnected imaginations and memories of experiences and conclusions. He invented a great tool with which to define his experiences called : language. It is a self-referential system where every point (word) is defined by the positions of all the other points relatif to it. (When you say "milk" you activate an complicated network of related words, experiences and meanings and it is only through the collective force of that circuit that the meaning of "milk" comes to life.) Self-referential means a bubble, a closed system. In his youth the human is still quite open (innocent) and lovable because of that. The more he starts to rely on what he knows (closure) the more he start to rely on that virtual network of meanings in his head. This of course gives him great practical, operational power which is greatly appreciated in our society. Trouble is that he is in danger of living more and more in this virtual world of counsciousness where he imagines everything, even his happyness. Page 538 of this book "..we are usually incapable of distinguishing our mental constructions and interpretations of the world itself...A deceptive trick is built into the way consciousness operates at every moment. Consciousness project and constructs a cognitive object in such a way that it disowns its own creation-- pretending the object is "out there"- in order to render that object capable of being appropriated. Even while what we cognize is ocurring within our act of cognition, we cognize it as if it were external to our consciousness.Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
5 of 11 people found the following review helpful By L. Ron Gardner on February 20, 2014
Format: Paperback
A fan of my books and Amazon reviews procured this text for me, because I wasn't about to dish out $40 for a text just to ream it in a review. But now that I've read it, I'm eager to lambaste it, because, frankly speaking, I have next to zero respect for Dan Lusthaus' "brand" of Buddhism.

Although I'm hardly a Ken Wilber fan, his statement, "Every man is a philosopher of his level of evolutionary adaptation," particularly pertains to Dan Lusthaus. To the spiritual cognoscenti, those who have "cracked the cosmic code," it couldn't be clearer that that Lusthaus is no more than a pseudo-profound talking head when it comes to Buddha Dharma. His vast erudition and boundless vocabulary can't hide the fact that he is "uninitiated" (by the Dharma Cloud/Stream, or Sambhogakaya); hence he doesn't know what Buddhism, and more specifically Yogacara, are really about.

Before I proceed with my review, I should caution readers about Lusthaus' book: it's only for intellectual types. Unless you're somewhat of a wonk, you'll struggle with the prose. Here's an example of Lusthaus' writing: "The relation between consciousness and the hyle is neither genitive nor ablative; whether it is locative, instrumental or dative is arguable; it is accusative."

In the subchapter What is(n't) Yogacara at the beginning of the book, Lusthaus presents the essence of his thesis: Yogacara (Mind-only Buddhism) is not metaphysical idealism. The idea that Mind (or Consciousness)-only refers to a universal, all pervading Mind -the One Mind - which has manifested as the all, is absurd to him, and he flatly rejects this point of view, which is that of D.T Suzuki, Edward Conze, W.Y. Evans Wentz, numerous other Buddhist scholars, and countless masters in all the Great Spiritual Traditions.
Read more ›
8 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again