Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy: Fear and Trembli... and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy Used
$4.45
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
Used: Acceptable | Details
Condition: Used: Acceptable
Comment: Fast Shipping - Safe and Secure Bubble Mailer!
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See all 2 images

Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy: Fear and Trembling in Sunnydale (Popular Culture and Philosophy, Vol. 4) Paperback – March 1, 2003


See all 5 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$260.44
Paperback
"Please retry"
$20.35 $0.19

Frequently Bought Together

Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy: Fear and Trembling in Sunnydale (Popular Culture and Philosophy, Vol. 4) + Why Buffy Matters: The Art of Buffy the Vampire Slayer + Fighting the Forces: What's at Stake in Buffy the Vampire Slayer
Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Best Books of the Month
Best Books of the Month
Want to know our Editors' picks for the best books of the month? Browse Best Books of the Month, featuring our favorite new books in more than a dozen categories.

Product Details

  • Paperback: 335 pages
  • Publisher: Open Court (March 2003)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0812695313
  • ISBN-13: 978-0812695311
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 6.1 x 0.7 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 3.9 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (24 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #216,420 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

More About the Authors

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

For those familiar with the series, I recommend reading this book and then rewatching the series.
dalisurreal
There is part of me that likes the way books like these think about television because sometimes it's the way I think about television.
B. A Varkentine
Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy is my favorite so far in Open Court's Popular Culture and Philosophy series.
Cindy Pineo

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

77 of 80 people found the following review helpful By Adrianna on May 28, 2003
Format: Paperback
Did you love Oz in Earshot? If so, this may be the book for you.
So you are the average Buffy fan, you do not sit around with your friends weighing the Nietzchian ideal of the ubermensch, nor do you discuss Faith's fatalistic nature. Will you enjoy this book? Possibly. Are you interested in philosophy? By chance did you take some in college, even an introductory course, but it didn't make any sense? This book may bring something to the table for you and clear up your confusion regarding some theoretical stuff. The gift with purchase will be that you will learn something new along the way.
Now if you are looking at this book to be a playful romp through Sunnydale, don't buy it. It's not. It will deconstruct some characters in ways you will not like, at the same time some observations will make you roll on the floor with hysterical laughter (or that could just be me). It will definately spark some thought, and if you buy one for a friend will result in many hours of arguing fun!
As one of the Buffy faithful, and a staunch reader of Slayage, the online journal of Buffy Studies, I loved this book. I loved it so much I want to buy one for all the Buffy fans I know. I want to trot over to Marquette and kiss James South if not for this book, for his AMAZING article on Willow, and his great understanding of the season 6 transformation she made. This book makes Fighting the Forces, and Reading the Slayer look like high school term papers. This book is smart, the editing is well done, and it made me feel smarter for reading it. This is by far the best of the best of Academic Buffyverse analysis. I hope that this sets the future standard for books of this type.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
76 of 79 people found the following review helpful By Robert Moore HALL OF FAMETOP 500 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on August 10, 2003
Format: Paperback
This latest volume in Open Court's Popular Culture and Philosophy Series is, like most anthologies, very uneven. Nearly every collection of essays contains some good, some average, and some disappointing essays. As a former Ph.D. student in philosophy and a huge fan of Buffy and all things pertaining to the Buffyverse, this seemed to be a book not merely down my alley, but on the street where I live. Unfortunately, overall, I found this to be a very disappointing collection.
There have been two major academic anthologies before this one: Roz Kaveny's READING THE VAMPIRE SLAYER and Rhonda V. Wilcox and David Lavery's FIGHTING THE FORCES. Both of these far surpass this newer volume, despite having the disadvantage of having been written at the end of Season Five of Buffy, while some of the essays in BUFFY THE VAMPIRE SLAYER AND PHILOSOPHY seem to have some knowledge of the first episode of Season Seven, and most reflect the revelation at the end of Season Six that Spike has gained a soul.
One of the reasons these other two anthologies are so much more successful is the fact that most of the writers in those two volumes were cultural critics rather than philosophers. As enormously witty, intelligent, and deep as the scripts for Buffy were, they were not deeply conversant with Western philosophy. In fact, philosophically, the Buffyverse essentially embraces a naive Cartesian dualism (a fact curiously unnoted by all the contributors to this volume), or at most a Christian tripartite conception of the person as Mind, Body, and Soul. Descartes attempted to resurrect Augustinian theology (based on Platonism) in opposition to the thought of Aquinas (based on Aristotelianism), and in doing so posited a radical gap between Mind and Body.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
86 of 101 people found the following review helpful By Tanya Marsh on March 22, 2003
Format: Paperback
I think that "Buffy, the Vampire Slayer" and "Angel" are, quite simply, the two best television shows today. Period. Don't get me wrong, I appreciate a wide range of television shows (I am an admitted television junkie), but in terms of emotional depth, intelligent writing, challenging storylines, and innovative and realistic characters, Joss Whedon's children are unparalleled.
Turns out I'm not the only one who thinks that the metaphors and metaphysics of the Buffyverse (to blatantly steal from Shaun Narine) are worth analyzing. In Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Philosophy: Fear and Trembling in Sunnydale, professors and students of philosophy tackle the key events, issues, and characters in the Buffyverse in a number of highly entertaining, engaging, and thought-provoking essays.
The Buffyverse has more than a few key events, issues, and characters that deserve serious debate: Buffy's role as a Slayer and her relationship to society; Faith's dalliance with good and evil; Angel's path to redemption; Buffy's self-destructive relationship with Spike; Willow's transformation from mousy teenager to Big Bad; and the metaphor which is the basis for all of it. Each of these topics are addressed by multiple authors, from different philosophical perspectives, in Fear and Trembling.
Given the timing of my review (i.e. at the end of Faith's Season Four arc on "Angel"), my mind was already on Faith, so the chapters which dealt with her were particularly fascinating to me. Is Faith's amoral pursuit of pleasure best explained by Plato or Nietzche? This book doesn't provide answers ? it provides a framework for the reader/viewer to analyze and grapple with the issues themselves. And isn't that why "Buffy" is so attractive to us in the first place?
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Most Recent Customer Reviews