Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works and over one million other books are available for Amazon Kindle. Learn more
Buy New
$17.68
Qty:1
  • List Price: $27.95
  • Save: $10.27 (37%)
FREE Shipping on orders over $35.
In Stock.
Ships from and sold by Amazon.com.
Gift-wrap available.
Add to Cart
Trade in your item
Get a $5.06
Gift Card.
Have one to sell? Sell on Amazon
Flip to back Flip to front
Listen Playing... Paused   You're listening to a sample of the Audible audio edition.
Learn more
See this image

Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach It to Everyone) Hardcover – August 4, 2014


See all 3 formats and editions Hide other formats and editions
Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
Hardcover
"Please retry"
$17.68
$17.08 $17.00
Fall%20New%20Releases


Frequently Bought Together

Building a Better Teacher: How Teaching Works (and How to Teach It to Everyone) + The Teacher Wars: A History of America's Most Embattled Profession + Getting Schooled: The Reeducation of an American Teacher
Price for all three: $52.82

Buy the selected items together

NO_CONTENT_IN_FEATURE

Image
Looking for the Audiobook Edition?
Tell us that you'd like this title to be produced as an audiobook, and we'll alert our colleagues at Audible.com. If you are the author or rights holder, let Audible help you produce the audiobook: Learn more at ACX.com.

Product Details

  • Hardcover: 384 pages
  • Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (August 4, 2014)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0393081591
  • ISBN-13: 978-0393081596
  • Product Dimensions: 9.2 x 6.5 x 1.3 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.6 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (20 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #1,322 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“We romanticize teachers, and we vilify them, but we don't do much to help. This beautifully written, defiantly hopeful book points the way to a better future for American teachers and the children they teach.” (Paul Tough, bestselling author of How Children Succeed)

“In this fascinating and accessible book, Elizabeth Green tells the story of the country's leading researchers on the all-important questions of what makes for an effective classroom teacher and how teachers can be trained to do their jobs better. That the story feels completely fresh is testament not only to Green’s skill as a reporter and writer but also to how beside-the-point much of the national conversation about education is. Green’s book ought to persuade the country to focus on what really matters in education.” (Nicholas Lemann, professor and dean emeritus at the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism)

“Elizabeth Green reveals, in cinematic detail, what makes great teaching such a dazzling intellectual challenge—and why it has taken us so unforgivably long to care. A must-read book for every American teacher and taxpayer.” (Amanda Ripley, author of The Smartest Kids in the World)

“In vivid detail, Elizabeth Green chronicles the long, uncertain, but ultimately promising efforts, based on research, to improve teaching in American schools.” (Howard Gardner, coauthor of The App Generation and author of Frames of Mind: The Theory of Multiple Intelligences)

“Great education is the foundation of a flourishing society, and it depends on great teachers. Building a Better Teacher illuminates how we can develop gifted educators who prepare children for a brighter future. With strong evidence and compelling cases, Elizabeth Green has written an important book that every educator ought to read.” (Adam Grant, Wharton professor and best-selling author of Give and Take)

“[Green] makes the case through thoughtful details that great teachers are made, not born… she brings hope and renewal to the field.” (Angela Leeper - Bookpage)

About the Author

Elizabeth Green is cofounder, CEO, and editor in chief of Chalkbeat, a nonprofit education news organization. A former Spencer Fellow at the Columbia School of Journalism, she has written for New York Times Magazine and other publications.

Customer Reviews

4.5 out of 5 stars
5 star
15
4 star
1
3 star
2
2 star
2
1 star
0
See all 20 customer reviews
This is simply a superb book.
scherbs
I recommend it for every type of teacher, educator and education board member everywhere.
Rodney G. Guldenstern
I am so glad I purchased it as it is a book I will refer to.
MC

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

8 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Amedeo Avogadro on August 18, 2014
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
Elizabeth Green has written a crisp, intelligent, and provocative book about the state of teaching and teacher education in America. We already knew that our students are not doing as well as those across the globe, from much poorer countries, and that this has been happening despite a dramatic increase in spending per pupil over the last half century. Why have our children's' schools failed them? In Building a Better Teacher, Green argues that it is not teachers who have failed their students, but the institution of educating and training teachers that has failed us all.

The book (and accompanying New York Times Magazine article, which is a distinct and also excellent read) begins to explore this thesis with a page-turning narrative of the Japanese system of teaching (specifically math), the method's original creation by American teachers, and the failure of American school systems to implement these methods across the country. The main idea of this method, as obvious as it may seem, is to emphasize mastery of concepts over mastery of execution. Think proofs instead of problems, and starting as early as students learn to count. The brilliant elementary school math lessons taught by book heroes Magdalene Lampert and Deborah Ball are such a thrill to read I found myself wishing I too had the chance to try out these ideas in the classroom. Perhaps the book will convince some to quit their jobs and become teachers.

The failure of American schools was not to recognize the importance of this concept, but to adopt it successfully. Green highlights two reasons for this failure. The first is that American teachers are given an excessive amount of autonomy in their work.
Read more ›
3 Comments Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 11 people found the following review helpful By MC on August 23, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
This is an absolutely amazing book. I am so glad I purchased it as it is a book I will refer to. Anyone involved in public education needs to read this book. It provides fascinating historical information. Many people have opinions on education but very few are well informed. This should be required reading for every board member. As a public school teacher and adjunct professor this book provides deeper understanding of the complexities involved in shifting a paradigm in public education. I will be sharing with my colleagues the gems in this book. If you are a parent, read this. If you are a taxpayer read this. If you care at all about transforming education, read about those who are profiled in this book attempting to create the change.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
12 of 16 people found the following review helpful By Loyd E. Eskildson HALL OF FAME on August 2, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
Education Secretary Arne Duncan once referred to education schools as a 'Bermuda Triangle- - students sail in, no one knows what happens to them, then some succeed as teachers (sail out) while many do not.

Both accountability and autonomy education proponents assume that good teachers know what to do to help their students learn, and that the average teacher will figure out how to become an expert teacher on their own. That's not a good path towards achieving educational excellence. Fortunately, Ms. Green's book shows us another way.

Hanushek's study of individual teacher's value-added contributions showed that teachers could do what the Coleman Report suggested schools could not do - offset the disadvantages of poverty. Students assigned to the best teachers progressed by an entire grade level more than those assigned to the worse, per test scores. Yet, the likely universal criteria (years of experience, number of post-graduate courses/degrees) used for rewarding teachers have little/no bearing on teacher achievement. Others have also found that bright young graduates without certification perform as well or better in the classroom as those with certification.

Why the lack of linkage between teacher education and pupil achievement? An Oxford professor named Harry Judge, touring American colleges of education at the request of the Ford Foundation, described their typical approach as 'the doctrine of anything but pedagogy). Education professors tended towards greater interest in their discipline of origin (eg. psychology, sociology) than the study of education. Thus, an education professor might study 'the history of the family,' 'the structure of higher education,' 'the changes in organizational theory' etc. before ever visiting a classroom.
Read more ›
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 5 people found the following review helpful By msufan on August 18, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
I was surprised to see this book take the form of a story, but then quickly found myself captivated by the characters and the work being done at Michigan State (especially since I was an elem. ed. student there in the 90s), in Japan, and elsewhere.

You get to the end of the book expecting a final summary -- some final conclusions to be drawn, a projection of where we should go in the future, or even perhaps a top ten list of things a teacher could do to improve one's practice -- but those never come.

It makes sense, really, that the book doesn't end with such a tidy wrap-up, because the future of education is still to be determined. It will be up to all of us in the field to write the next chapter ourselves.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
9 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Elizabeth Vidaurre on August 5, 2014
Format: Kindle Edition
An incredible book. Meticulously researched and expertly written, Green manages to cut through the dogma and politics and assess what really matters in education.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Customer Images

Most Recent Customer Reviews

Search