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Building Bone Vitality: A Revolutionary Diet Plan to Prevent Bone Loss and Reverse Osteoporosis--Without Dairy Foods, Calcium, Estrogen, or Drugs Paperback


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Building Bone Vitality: A Revolutionary Diet Plan to Prevent Bone Loss and Reverse Osteoporosis--Without Dairy Foods, Calcium, Estrogen, or Drugs + The Whole-Body Approach to Osteoporosis: How to Improve Bone Strength and Reduce Your Fracture Risk (The New Harbinger Whole-Body Healing Series) + Yoga for Osteoporosis: The Complete Guide
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 256 pages
  • Publisher: McGraw-Hill; 1 edition (May 1, 2009)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0071600191
  • ISBN-13: 978-0071600194
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6 x 0.6 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 12 ounces (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.1 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (40 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #61,586 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

About the Author

Amy Joy Lanou, Ph.D., is an assistant professor of health and wellness at the University of North Carolina. She is the author of Healthy Eating for Life for Children and has appeared in Time and Newsweek and on National Public Radio.

Michael Castleman has been called “one of nation’s top health writers” by Library Journal. He is the author of more than a dozen books, including The Healing Herbs and Before You Call the Doctor, and his science journalism has been nominated twice for the National Magazine Awards.


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Customer Reviews

The book is easy and enjoyable to read.
M. Rhode
And they suggest simple methods and recipes for how to do this without drastic changes for most people.
ask4facts
I would recommend this book to anyone concerned about their bones.
apluscollectibles

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

139 of 140 people found the following review helpful By ask4facts on September 9, 2009
Format: Paperback
The authors offer their insights on osteoporosis after reviewing over 1,200 research articles on the topic. And they tell readers how to find that literature, or will actually send you copies of all of it for a fee that covers their expenses. This strengthens their positions that the commonly held beliefs to drink your milk, eat your dairy products or take a calcium supplement to prevent or treat osteoporosis are not based upon a preponderance of research findings. As an alternative they explain that we have developed a diet that is high in protein (especially animal protein) and low in fruits and vegetables. This leads to a chronic state of metabolic acidosis (an acid condition within the blood stream), which the body treats by resorbing bone to neutralize (buffer) the acid condition. Over time this chronic loss of small amounts of bone calcium can lead to low bone mineral density, osteopenia or osteoporosis, with increased risk of fracture. They cite several research articles that have noted this association, in particular, the one by Lynda A. Frassetto, Karen M. Todd, R. Curtis Morris, Jr. and Anthony Sebastian, which found a direct correlation between increased animal protein intake and increased hip fracture risk. They also found a correlation between increased vegetable intake and decreased hip fracture risk. This article is available online for free at [...]. The diagrams of these correlations in the article are proof that a picture is worth a thousand words.

The second part of the program to prevent or treat osteoporosis is through weight bearing exercise. They also show the abundance of research that backs this up as an effective method.
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110 of 111 people found the following review helpful By Anne B. Simons on August 3, 2009
Format: Paperback
I'm a family practitioner in practice for over 20 years and I found this book refreshingly thought-provoking. I'm also a breast cancer survivor who was diagnosed with osteoporosis and put on prescription medication based solely on bone density studies. I like to think I keep up to date on the medical literature by reading journals and attending continuing education, but I was shocked and amazed by the sheer number of studies cited in this book (and rarely if ever mentioned in those journals and courses) that challenge the conventional wisdom on bone health. While the authors do not discount the usefulness of medication for some, their common sense advice on lifestyle as the key to "bulding bone vitality" is the most important news this decade for women, doctors and parents like me. I only wish I could get my daughter and younger women patients to read this book and follow its prescription!
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47 of 50 people found the following review helpful By M. Rhode on June 9, 2009
Format: Paperback
This important book will change how you think about osteoporosis prevention! It is thoroughly researched and should be required reading in all medical schools and for all doctors in practice. Why hasn't this information been made more "public" by the medical community and the popular media? Hopefully it will be now that this book is published. The low acid diet described by the authors is simple to follow and less expensive then taking calcium pills and other osteoporosis medications. The book is easy and enjoyable to read. I highly recommend it!
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73 of 85 people found the following review helpful By Catherine Jo Morgan VINE VOICE on August 2, 2009
Format: Paperback
Eating lots of vegetables and fruits is certainly good for healthy bones, as is weight-bearing exercise. There's nothing revolutionary about this news. Nor is the idea new that calcium is the main way to build bones. I've read other books advancing the "alkaline food theory" as the key to preventing or reversing osteoporosis, but I believe that building strong, resilient bones is more complicated than that. For example, more recent research shows that prunes are much more effective in reversing osteoporosis than raisins -- yet this book's chart shows that by the alkaline theory, raisins should be more effective. Also, judging fracture rates by country isn't a fine enough analysis; fracture rates WITHIN China vary a lot, with vitamin K2 apparently a key factor (but probably not the ONLY factor).

Also, just adding up the number of studies pro and con various factors (protein, calcium, etc.) doesn't take into account the way the studies were done. The longterm Harvard nutritional study of nurses relies a lot on the subjects' memory of what they ate, and how much of it -- the least reliable type of study. Most nutritional studies are like this -- so it's not surprising that there are so many conflicting conclusions.

Aside from the fact that this book doesn't present anything really new, and overgeneralizes, it's OK. Just don't take it as enough by itself. And if you take medications or have any medical problems, do more research before dramatically increasing the amount of potassium and fiber you take in. See the "Contraindications and Precautions in the Alkaline Diet" section on page 515 of "Food and Nutrients in Disease Management" by Ingrid Kohlstadt, which you can preview at Google Books.Food and Nutrients in Disease Management
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21 of 22 people found the following review helpful By Doris in Corvallis on December 31, 2009
Format: Paperback
The nutritional information in this book is essential for anyone battling osteoporosis, or for younger women and even men at risk because of familial tendencies or other risk factors. The eating style given here can help enormously, while protecting from many cancers and other diseases.

Be sure to read Chapter 9, Bricks and Mortar, with care. Then look at the nutrient chart at [...] for a more comprehensive chart of nutrients, with recommended amounts. (Note: this is the web site for Susan E. Brown's older but better written and worthwhile book, Better Bones, Better Body : Beyond Estrogen and Calcium. Also worthwhile: the chapter on osteoporosis in Food and Nutrients in Disease Management.

What's wrong with this book? It's so repetitive that it can be discouraging: I suspect that many readers give up before they get to the essential points about nutrients, exercise, etc. It makes the main point about low-acid diet over and over and over again. It is not as comprehensive as it could and should be about nutritional variety and about exercise. It almost ridicules osteoporosis medications and calcium supplements in the earlier chapters, possibly leading some people to give them up, then toward the end admits that they may help. It does not mention the importance of B12 until late in the book, and doesn't mention vegans' possible iron deficiency. It ignores sugar in all of its charts and discussion.

What's right: a thorough look at research; a great listing of sources; enthusiasm for the important main point.

I hope that a second edition may remedy the faults and give all of us the resource we should have about osteoporosis.
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