Digital List Price: $35.99
Kindle Price: $19.79

Save $16.20 (45%)

These promotions will be applied to this item:

Some promotions may be combined; others are not eligible to be combined with other offers. For details, please see the Terms & Conditions associated with these promotions.

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Deliver to your Kindle or other device

Flip to back Flip to front
Audible Narration Playing... Paused   You are listening to a sample of the Audible narration for this Kindle book.
Learn more

Building Embedded Linux Systems Kindle Edition

22 customer reviews

Amazon Price New from Used from
Kindle
"Please retry"
$19.79

Shop the New Digital Design Bookstore
Check out the Digital Design Bookstore, a new hub for photographers, art directors, illustrators, web developers, and other creative individuals to find highly rated and highly relevant career resources. Shop books on web development and graphic design, or check out blog posts by authors and thought-leaders in the design industry. Shop now
This title is not available for Kindle 1st generation devices, but is available for newer Kindle devices and free Kindle reading applications.


Editorial Reviews

Review

"The lessons learnt using this book alongside systems such as the IPAQ will certainly pay off." - Martin Howse, LinuxUser & Developer, issue 31 "This book should be essential reading for embedded system designers at all levels of experience who intend to use Linux in current or future projects. The only other thing you need is an internet connection to download the source code of components that are used." Industrial Networking & Open Control, June 2003

About the Author

Karim Yaghmour is the founder and president of Opersys Inc. (http://www.opersys.com), a company providing expertise and courses on the use of open source and free software in embedded systems. Being himself an active member of the open source and free software community, Karim has firmly established Opersys's services around the core values of knowledge sharing and technical quality promoted by this community. As part of his community involvement, Karim is the maintainer of the Linux Trace Toolkit and the author of a series of white-papers that led to the implementation of the Adeos nanokernel, which allows multiple operating systems to exist side-by-side. Karim's quest for understanding how things work started at a very young age when he took it upon himself to break open all the radios and cassette players he could lay his hands on in order to "fix" them. Very early, he developed a keen interest in operating system internals and embedded systems. He now holds a B.Eng. and an M.A.Sc. from the cole Polytechnique de Montral. While everyone was hacking away at Linux, Karim even took a detour to write his own distributed micro-kernel in order to get to the bottom of operating system design and implementation. When not working on software, Karim indulges in his passion for history, philosophy, sociology, and humanities in general. He's especially addicted to essays and novels by Umberto Eco and Gerald Messadi.


Product Details

  • File Size: 1100 KB
  • Print Length: 416 pages
  • Simultaneous Device Usage: Unlimited
  • Publisher: O'Reilly Media; 1 edition (April 22, 2003)
  • Publication Date: February 9, 2009
  • Sold by: Amazon Digital Services, Inc.
  • Language: English
  • ASIN: B0043EWUFW
  • Text-to-Speech: Enabled
  • X-Ray:
  • Word Wise: Not Enabled
  • Lending: Not Enabled
  • Enhanced Typesetting: Not Enabled
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #982,607 Paid in Kindle Store (See Top 100 Paid in Kindle Store)
  •  Would you like to give feedback on images?


More About the Author

Discover books, learn about writers, read author blogs, and more.

Customer Reviews

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

40 of 44 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on June 13, 2003
Format: Paperback
Entering the world of embedded Linux development was a daunting task not too long ago, since information was spread thinnly across the web, and books were not readily available. Several books have appeared recently, and a couple are ok, but this book is the most thorough available to date. It covers all important aspects of the development process, from concepts to debugging, with toolchain building, the kernel, bootloaders, networking and root file systems in between. I would highly recommend this book. It has been extremely helpful to me.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
24 of 26 people found the following review helpful By Warrick Lacey on May 2, 2004
Format: Paperback
I am (and have been since October) in the midst of new hardware bring up. I am not a LINUX novice but performing a kernel bring up -- well let's just say I assembled a number of books in preparation of the project.
Forturnately for me, this book was one I selected.
I found the text to be be thorough (w/plenty of references to other texts, also by O'Reilly) starting with the general and moving on to specifics.
I like the order of the presentations. Often times I find the next chapter the next task confronting me.
Good Job Mr. Yaghmour!!!
You saved me a lot of pain.
Well worth the money.
Warrick Lacey
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
19 of 23 people found the following review helpful By Arun Kalluri on September 9, 2003
Format: Paperback
This book is a good starting point for people to understand the work of embedded linux engineers in the real world. It is also a great book for experienced people in the industry as they can collect various pieces of missing information. I just wish I had this book two years back when I learnt all this stuff the hardway through pieces of information on web. Technology changes fast, but the stuff mentioned in the book is still up to date in the industry.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
8 of 9 people found the following review helpful By Mark D. Lucia on November 4, 2004
Format: Paperback
I found this book a "must read" if you are even thinking about embedded linux. Karim's discussions about flash devices and files systems is information you could spend weeks aquiring else where.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
4 of 4 people found the following review helpful By paulsm on July 8, 2007
Format: Paperback
On the one hand, a typical Linux user is going to install a pre-built package (Red Hat, Suse, Ubuntu, etc) on pre-built PC. This book isn't for them - there are plenty of books for learning and using Linux.

On the other hand, embedded systems developers often have a good, working toolchain from a vendor like WindRiver or DataLight. This book isn't necessarily for them, either.

But if you're building your own system: your own DIO controllers, perhaps with a mix of flash drives and conventional storage, perhaps remote booting ... and if you've decided to use Open Source as your platform ...
then you NEED this book.

There simply isn't any other text out there that covers the breadth of subjects (toolchain, kernel build, kernel tailoring, media types, etc etc etc) with the wealth of details as this book.

It's an excellent book, and an indispensible resource.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
6 of 7 people found the following review helpful By njbulitka on January 26, 2006
Format: Paperback
I found this book to give a well-rounded discussion of (as the title says) building embedded LINUX systems. The author does a good job presenting the material and nicely presents concepts that non-experts can quickly grasp. The book covers: basic concepts, hardware support, development tools, kernel considerations, and file management topics. It also covers bootloader, networking, and debugging tools. I would have preferred more coverage on the debugging tools. Yaghmour did a good job in explaining his ideas. I did not need to refer to other LINUX books to have terminology explained. Chapter 7 was particularly insightful in its discussion of memory storage (flash) devices.

The book is very practical (hand's on) in its approach. I recommend it highly for the person developing embedded LINUX systems. I don't think that you'll be disappointed.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
10 of 13 people found the following review helpful By J. Frederick on August 29, 2003
Format: Paperback
Even if you already have development tools, this text is helpful for administering an embedded Linux device, or for locating applications/daemons to run on an embedd Linux device. This text deals with different architectures, like ARM etc.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again
14 of 20 people found the following review helpful By Yue Zhang on July 24, 2005
Format: Paperback
This book trys to present everything but does not really explain anything. For newbies in embedded system, concepts are not well defined and explained. While for experienced people, they are just nothing at all. It only collected all the related names in the book , and as a whole I don't think its worth the money. Most materials on the internet are more valuable than this.
Comment Was this review helpful to you? Yes No Sending feedback...
Thank you for your feedback. If this review is inappropriate, please let us know.
Sorry, we failed to record your vote. Please try again

Forums

There are no discussions about this product yet.
Be the first to discuss this product with the community.
Start a new discussion
Topic:
First post:
Prompts for sign-in