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Building Windows 8 Apps with C# and XAML (Microsoft Windows Development Series) Paperback – November 4, 2012

ISBN-13: 978-0321822161 ISBN-10: 0321822161 Edition: 1st

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Building Windows 8 Apps with C# and XAML (Microsoft Windows Development Series) + Windows 8 Apps with XAML and C# Unleashed + Professional Windows 8 Programming: Application Development with C# and XAML
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Product Details

  • Series: Microsoft Windows Development Series
  • Paperback: 384 pages
  • Publisher: Addison-Wesley Professional; 1 edition (November 4, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0321822161
  • ISBN-13: 978-0321822161
  • Product Dimensions: 9.1 x 7.1 x 0.8 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.3 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 3.5 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (28 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #668,823 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

From the Back Cover

 

About the Author

Jeremy Likness is a principal consultant at Wintellect, LLC. He has worked with enterprise applications for more than 20 years, 15 of those focused on web-based applications using the Microsoft stack. An early adopter of Silverlight 3.0, he worked on countless enterprise Silverlight solutions, including the back-end health monitoring system for the 2010 Vancouver Winter Olympics and Microsoft’s own social network monitoring product called “Looking Glass.” He is both a consultant and project manager at Wintellect and works closely with Fortune 500 companies, including Microsoft. He is a three-year Microsoft MVP and was declared MVP of the Year in 2010. He has also received Microsoft’s Community Contributor award for his work with Silverlight. Jeremy is the author of Designing Silverlight Business Applications: Best Practices for Using Silverlight Effectively in the Enterprise (Addison-Wesley). Jeremy regularly speaks, contributes articles, and blogs on topics of interest to the Microsoft developer community. His blog can be found at http://csharperimage.jeremylikness.com.



More About the Author

Jeremy Likness is a 5 year Microsoft MVP and was named MVP of the Year in 2010. He is a principal consultant and has spent the past 15 years building highly scalable web-based commercial solutions using the Microsoft technology stack. He has 20 years of experience developing enterprise applications across multiple verticals including insurance, health and wellness, financial, supply chain management, and mobility. He is the creator of the popular MVVM framework Jounce and an open source Silverlight Isolated Storage Database System called Sterling. Likness speaks and blogs frequently on Windows 8.1, AngularJS, MVC, JavaScript, and related Microsoft technologies.


Customer Reviews

I thought the author's writing style made the book very easy to read from cover to cover.
T. Anderson
Jeremy starts the book with a history of Windows and Microsoft development, before starting on the main part of the book - Developing Windows 8 Apps with C#.
Rupert Hollom
If you really need to write and understand in a detailed way how everything works and REALLY LEARN then get another book.
Marcus Fenix

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

6 of 8 people found the following review helpful By Marcus Fenix on January 23, 2013
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This is more like an introduction to Windows 8 App. You will get a history lesson of Windows development through the years, the book started nicely with the Image Helper app in a tutorial like fashion. The example throws an error (if you type the example as it is in the book), but author provided updated code. I got excited reading this chapter because of this tutorial step by step example, and I thought the book will continue this way all the way to the end, but no, that is it. Then you get random examples, author tells you to open the code and explains a few areas, but not the whole picture, so you keep wondering how this or how that works.

You need to read the example code and try to understand how things are connected. Especially things like the Visual State Manager on a Windows 8 app (Filled, Snapped, FullScreen), it looks like the app magically changes the view, but you have repeated code for each state and then things get hidden or displayed (there are some mentions, and you can figure that out reading the full code), but only devoted like 2 pages to the VSM, something that is very important. Doesn't give examples about doing something like this from scratch or how to modify the built-in templates. XAML section was brief, I know there are other XAML books, but there are many changes and specifics to the Windows RT apps, that I believe required more explanation than the one given. He touches the topics briefly, and lets you know that the option is there, but it doesn't go deep into almost any topic.

Another thing is that with the downloaded code examples, they include many custom helper classes.
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Format: Paperback
Review of Building Windows 8 Apps with C# and XAML

During the holiday season, I received the Building Windows 8 Apps with C# and XAML by Jeremy Likness. Holidays are the perfect time to read books! Before starting the book, I was curious to know if it would be useful to me, since I created my first Windows 8 app (Canadian Developer Connection) earlier this year where I included a lot of Windows 8 features. It turned out that I was very satisfied with the number of things I learned.

The reader should have extreme confidence in the content of the book, given the author's solid experience and background.

The book starts with a simple app that is more than just a "Hello World" app. After the first app, a beginner would be happy to read and learn more.

The author took the time to explain some "under the cover" mechanisms of the new Windows 8 Store app world. Yes, the Registry is still present more than ever. This information is very much appreciated.

Reading about the controls, the application lifecycle, the way to save data, the charms, the packaging, the deploying and more, the reader will get a complete picture of how to take advantage of Windows 8 features.

One of the most important aspects about programming is testing. Even though this aspect is not only related to Windows 8 development, the author dedicates a whole chapter to testing and the high importance of doing unit tests. The experiences that he wrote about proved that even more. For all levels of developers, this chapter is a good reminder of one of the aspects we tend to push aside.

Throughout the book, there is code that is available open-source. The book is a great companion to the provided code and some of the code can even be used in your own apps.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By just a guy with kids on February 26, 2014
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
As a blog follower of Jeremy, I've always been impressed with his writing. This book does not disappoint. Can't go wrong with his work in this book. Thanks Jeremy!
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By Richard A L Ellis on January 6, 2014
Format: Paperback
I have a number of books on this subject. I Like the approach taken and found the book to be very helpful
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9 of 14 people found the following review helpful By T. Anderson TOP 1000 REVIEWERVINE VOICE on November 20, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
This book is the perfect size and the perfect depth for getting up to speed quickly with building Windows 8 Store Applications.

The book starts by introducing WinRT. This introduction includes a really nice history of how Microsoft got to where they are now. It starts with a look back at MS-DOS, MS-DOS Executive, the Win32 API, COM, and.NET. The introduction leads us up to NUI (Natural User Interface) and the Windows Store Application Design Principles.

The first chapter ends with a look at the Windows 8 tool that are available to developers and designers. They include, Blend for Visual Studio, C++ and XAML, HTML5 and JavaScript, and VB/C# and XAML.

I have listed all the chapters below.

1. The New Windows Runtime
2. Getting Started
3. Extensible Application Markup Language (XAML)
4. Windows 8 Applications
5. Application Lifecycle
6. Data
7. Tiles and Toasts
8. Giving Your Application Charm
9. MVVM and Testing
10. Packaging and Deploying

The Getting Started chapter covers setting up your environment, which includes Windows 8, Visual Studio 2012, and expression blend for Visual Studio. It also covers the details of all the available project templates that come in the Windows Store category of Visual Studio's project templates.

The book then continues on with a nice overview of XAML. The author does a good job of covering a lot of topics as well as going in-depth enough to give you a thorough understanding of the topics that he chose to cover. XAML is a big topic, but the author did a great job of covering the essentials needed to get started.

Chapter 4, Windows 8 Applications, starts out with a nice overview of the Windows 8 simulator that comes with the development environment.
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