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Bulfinch's Mythology: The Age of the Fable, The Age of Chivalry, Legends of Hardcover – December 24, 1991


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Product Details

  • Hardcover: 768 pages
  • Publisher: Harper Collins; Revised edition (December 24, 1991)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 0062700251
  • ISBN-13: 978-0062700254
  • Product Dimensions: 7.4 x 2.2 x 9.2 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 3.4 pounds
  • Average Customer Review: 4.8 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (9 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #623,139 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Customer Reviews

4.8 out of 5 stars
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4 star
22%
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See all 9 customer reviews
It really is very interesting reading.
Amazon Customer
Everything from the Greek & Roman gods to King Arthur is included in this book, along w/lesser known stories that are just as interesting in their own right.
Richard Salinas
Highly recommended for the student of mythology.
LR

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

24 of 24 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on January 20, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This new edition of the classic Bulfinch's Mythology is excellent. It has retained all of Bulfinch's old texts and introductions to myths and their histories, but it has also added some new introductory material. This material, much having to do with Bulfinch's own life and education helps to bring light into the context for which Bulfinch was writing. For example, did you know that Bulfinch originally began writing mythology pieces for magazine entertainment? There is also much information in the new introductions about Bulfinch's education and the place that he held (or rather, didn't hold) within Boston's then extremely rigid social strata. The editor also provides an interesting look at why Bulfinch told the myths in the way he did and compares the sources that Bulfinch used to those of his contemporaries (Hawthorne, for example). It really is very interesting reading.
Of course, this edition of Bulfinch's mythology still contains all of the wonderful myths that our society has come to know through this book, along with Bulfinch's original introductions to each chapter.
The book is large and heavy, therefore not a great traveling companion. Still, it more than makes up for it with content. If you keep this book out on your shelf and read a small bit of myth every day, you will never be bored or lack for reading material again.
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13 of 14 people found the following review helpful By Matt Molnar on March 23, 2000
Format: Hardcover
Bulfinch's Mythology is, simply put, the best. I cannot think of another book I simply enjoyed reading more. It deals with classical myth, the tales of Charlemagne and Arthur, some Celtic myths... it is an invaluable companion to someone who is studying cultural history, or just as an eminently readable book. It serves as an admirable companion to Frazer's "The Golden Bough", giving some context to much of his writing.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By Richard Salinas on May 24, 2009
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
This is a reference work that belongs in every home, especially if you have kids. The width & breadth of stories contained here will astound even those who think they are well-versed in mythology. Everything from the Greek & Roman gods to King Arthur is included in this book, along w/lesser known stories that are just as interesting in their own right. While it may be too sophisticated for elementary readers, it is just right for 11-13 y.o. kids to jump into to supplement their Harry Potter or Star Wars passions. Even curious adults will find something they didn't know before. Makes a great gift for all ages!!
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11 of 13 people found the following review helpful By Abbie on August 25, 2003
Format: Hardcover
This book does cover the well-known myths of several different cultures, and it does well on that, but no book can cover every myth of every time period, and in the end I suppose that's what everyone wants.
For the most part if you're looking for Greek or Celtic myths this is a book you have to have, any other society's myths and you'd probably be better off with a different, more concentrated book, not something with such a wide-spread focus.
Overall a wonderful book, completely worth it's cost.
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1 of 1 people found the following review helpful By LR on March 16, 2013
Format: Hardcover Verified Purchase
I primarily bought this for the section on The Age of Chivalry, which was excellent; but I found the other sections informative and interesting as well. Highly recommended for the student of mythology.
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More About the Author


Professor Richard P. Martin teaches Greek and Latin literature at Stanford. Martin's research focuses primarily on Homeric poetry and how it functioned as a performance art in ancient Greece. His research has involved fieldwork in modern Crete, interviewing those who still perform traditional oral epics. In addition,he has studied resemblances between ancient oral poetry and modern rap. He has worked on presenting Homer digitally, in a full-scale multimedia version of the Odyssey on CD, in connection with distance learning projects. Martin is also interested in the performance of Greek lyric as represented in myth and art, and the analysis of Greek myth.

Prof. Martin is currently working on three books: Homeric Religion; Comic Community (about the social contexts of comic productions in ancient Athens); and Homer Abroad, about Greek epic as compared with other ancient and contemporary epic traditions.

Born and raised in Boston, he studied Classics as well as Medieval and Modern Irish language and literature at Harvard University where he received his B.A. in Classics and Celtic Literature and M.A. and Ph.D. in Classical Philology. Prior to his position at Stanford, Professor Martin taught Classics for eighteen years at Princeton University. He was the Chair of the Classics department at Stanford from 2002 through 2008.

Key Works

"Read on Arrival," in The Wandering Poets of Ancient Greece, edit. R. Hunter and I. Rutherford. Cambridge 2009.

"Words Alone are Certain Good(s)" TAPA (138.2) 313-49 (2008)

"Myth, Performance, Poetics: the Gaze from Classics," pp. 45-52 in Ethnographica Moralia: Experiments in Interpretive Anthropology, edit. Neni Panourgia and George Marcus. New York: Fordham UP.

"Outer Limits, Choral Space," pp.35-62 in Visualizing the Tragic: Drama, Myth, and Ritual in Greek Art and Literature, edit. Chris Kraus, Simon Goldhill, Helene P. Foley, Jas Elsner. Oxford, 2007.

"Homer among the Irish: Synge, Yeats, George Thompson, and Parry," pp 75-91 in Homer in the Twentieth Century: Between World Literature and the Western Canon, edit. Barbara Graziosi and Emily Greenwood. Oxford.

The Birds (Aristophanes). Translated and adapted with Paul Muldoon. Gallery Press, 1999.

"The Scythian Accent: Anacharsis and the Cynics" in B. Branham & M.-O. Goulet-Caze eds. The Cynics: The Cynic Movement in Antiquity and Its Legacy. University of California Press, 1997: 136-55.

The Language of Heroes: Speech and Performance in the Iliad. Cornell University Press, 1993.

"The Seven Sages as Performers of Wisdom" in C. Dougherty and L. Kurke eds. Cultural Poetics of Archaic Greece: Cult, Performance, Politics. Cambridge University Press, 1993: 108-128.

"Telemachus and the Last Hero Song" Colby Quarterly 29.3 (1993): 222-40.

"Hesiod's Metanastic Poetics" Ramus 21.1 (1992): 11-33.

Healing, Sacrifice, and Battle: Amechania and Related Concepts in Early Greek Poetry. Institut fur Sprachwissenschaft der Universitat Innsbruck, 1983.