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Bulls Bears and the Ballot Box: How the Performance of OUR Presidents Has Impacted YOUR Wallet Paperback – July 1, 2012


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Bulls Bears and the Ballot Box: How the Performance of OUR Presidents Has Impacted YOUR Wallet + Presimetrics: What the Facts Tell Us About How the Presidents Measure Up On the Issues We Care About
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Product Details

  • Paperback: 266 pages
  • Publisher: Advantage Media Group (July 1, 2012)
  • Language: English
  • ISBN-10: 1599322889
  • ISBN-13: 978-1599322889
  • Product Dimensions: 9 x 6.1 x 0.9 inches
  • Shipping Weight: 1.2 pounds (View shipping rates and policies)
  • Average Customer Review: 4.6 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (32 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #543,127 in Books (See Top 100 in Books)

Editorial Reviews

Review

“Don't just buy a single copy of this book. Buy dozens, send them to everyone you know, and do it now! In a clear, concise, and accessible style, Bob Deitrick and Lew Goldfarb have written a book that, finally, lets the facts speak for themselves. In doing so, they have turned a whole lot of what stands for conventional wisdom on its head . Necessary reading before family gatherings, high school reunions, elections, or turning on Fox News...wherever and whenever the discussion is likely to turn to politics. Deitrick and Goldfarb are not politicians and they are not from the Beltway, and perhaps that's why this book contains more common sense per page than just about any other book of this sort I know of”.
                                                                                                                             - David Wilhelm, Former Chairman of the Democratic National Committee (1993 and 1994), former political advisor and senior political advisor to Bill Clinton

About the Author

Bob Deitrick is the co-owner of Polaris Financial Partners and a native of Northern Virginia.  He has lived in Ohio since 1981.  He attended Virginia Tech before graduating from The Ohio State University in 1984, with a degree in finance.   He has been a financial planning professional for 28 years.  He started his career with Cigna Individual Financial Services and then later moved to Lincoln Financial Group.  Bob created his own independent wealth management firm in 2003.  He has appearance numerous times on local television in Columbus, discussing various financial topics including the stock market, financial planning and lobbying on behalf of the Ohio Jump$tart Coalition.  He has taught Financial Planning at The Ohio State University, and was a co-founder of the Foundation for Excellence in Financial Planning Education at Ohio State.  He has started and worked on several pilots that teach Financial Planning at multiple high schools in the Columbus area.  Bob is co-author of Bulls, Bears and the Ballot Box, co-written with Lew Goldfarb.  Bob is a Chartered Financial Consultant and he also holds his Series 6, 7, 21, 39 and 63 licenses with FINRA.  He is a father of three children— Mitchell, Mallory and Meredith.

 

Lew Goldfarb is a CPA, business lawyer, law professor, and  entrepreneur.  Currently, he is professor at the University of Cincinnati College of Law, where he serves as Director of the College’s Entrepreneurship and Community Development Clinic.  Lew owned a small business prior to his transition to academia.

Lew spent most of his professional career as a business lawyer, serving as an associate at the Baker & Hostetler law firm and then Associate Chief Counsel and Intellectual Property Group Manager at Honda of America Mfg., Inc.

Lew attended The Ohio State University, graduating summa cum laude with a degree in Business Administration, majoring in Accounting.  He worked as a CPA at Arthur Andersen LLP prior to attending The Ohio State University College of Law, graduating with honors.  Lew graduated as valedictorian from Perkins High School in his hometown of Sandusky, Ohio.   

Lew is actively involved in community service activities, is an avid sports fan, and currently resides in Hilliard, Ohio with his wife, Sharon, and his twin sons, Benjamin and Joshua.

 

 


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Customer Reviews

4.6 out of 5 stars
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It's easy to read in spurts and reread to other.
Douglas Dawsonj
It's hard to make sense of U.S. economic policy given the information provided by mainstream media.
Gregory P. Johnson
This book should be required reading for anyone who votes.
Allan J Weber

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

9 of 9 people found the following review helpful By mjplatt on December 25, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
The book is not a novel, it is full of charts and figures. But it is worth the read. However, I would add that to imply that only the President alone is responsible for how the economy fairs is, well, unfair. It would have been good if they had included information on what party had control of both the houses of Congress as well. After all, they are the ones making the laws that govern the country. It's difficult to believe that Congress did not have any effect on the country or the economy.

I say this not to discourage you from reading the book. I recommend it. But it just doesn't tell the complete story.
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13 of 15 people found the following review helpful By Michael Charney on August 12, 2012
Format: Paperback
Polls are a funny thing. They purport to tell us what we think, but it's perhaps more accurate to say that they tell us what we feel. And what we feel, it turns out, may not be borne out by the facts.

Take, for example, a recent USA Today/Gallup poll: Conducted just a couple of weeks ago, the poll's results tell us that we prefer Mitt Romney (and, correlatively, the GOP agenda) for handling our economy. By more than 2-to-1 margin (63% to 29%), we seem to believe that Mitt would provide better stewardship, stewardship which, ultimately, should mean less pain and more pleasure, wallet-wise. Oh, sure, we like Obama better (by a similar 2-to-1 spread), but when it comes to the economy (which another poll, this by Rasmussen, tell us is the number one thing we care about when lever-pulling-time comes around), apparently we prefer the smug, rich guy.

That certainly seems to be the conventional wisdom, doesn't it? That the GOP does a better job with our economy than the Dems? That business does better and the stock market rises when conservatives plant their flags in the round room?

Well, not so, argue Bob Dietrick and Lew Goldfarb in their new book Bulls, Bears and the Ballot Box: How the Performance of Our Presidents Has Impacted Your Wallet, in which they rank eleven presidents--starting from one financial crisis and ending at another--on their relative stewardship of the United States economy. (Note: they combine Kennedy/Johnson and Nixon/Ford because of the extenuating circumstances in each case.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By sNovah on October 29, 2013
Format: Kindle Edition Verified Purchase
The very first thing that the authors state is that this is an impartial book: this is not entirely true, as they certainly seem to favor those they felt were most responsible for the United State's economic success. However, this favor was not divided by party-lines: they speak glowingly of both Democrats and Republicans at one point or another, and they wisely avoid any sort of partisan issues.

This book is dedicated to one simple review: the economic record of the Presidents since Hoover took office. While acknowledging that the President alone is not responsible for economic policy (or failure/success), the authors argue that, like a CEO, the President's job is to direct economic policy, working with Congress and business leaders to make this possible. Therefore, while it's true a President is not an economic dictator, one of their qualifications is if they were able to work with Congress to make things happen (ie, they were a Statesman), or they refused to buckle on ideological issues (they were partisan), the latter of which almost always has an abysmal record.

The authors created their own meta-metrics for measuring a president's economic success and ability. They simplify these in various ways, my personal favorite being the value-after-the term: they do the math to determine, if a person invested $100,000 in various savings/retirement accounts, what they would be worth after the term ended; while almost all these increase, the degree to which they increase (and under which presidents) would likely surprise most people.
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10 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Michael Kimel on July 25, 2012
Format: Paperback Verified Purchase
A couple of years ago, Michael Kanell of the Atlanta Journal Constitution and I wrote a book called Presimetrics: What the Facts Tell Us About How the Presidents Measure Up On the Issues We Care About. In it, we looked at how Presidents did on a wide range of issues - everything from abortions to the national debt. We measured performance the same way for every issue - looking at how things changed from right before an administration took office to right before it left office, and in each case, we got the data from the most objective source available. Our approach was imperfect, but by maintaining consistency in how we approached each issue, we tried to be as unbiased as possible. And on many issues, we found that Presidents did well tended to follow similar policies to other Presidents that did well on the same issues, and likewise, the Presidents who did poorly on the issues also tended to have similar policies to other Presidents who did poorly on the issues.

The book got virtually no press so almost nobody ever heard of it, and it didn't sell all that well, which is obviously too bad for both me and Michael Kanell. But what I think is too bad for most Americans is that the notion of trying to put an objective measure on the performance of our politicians hasn't caught on. Sure, there are the various "think tanks" purporting to do just that, but they seem to start with a conclusion and work their way backward to justify that conclusion. I find that sort of thing less than useful.

As a result, I was extremely pleased with Bulls Bears and the Ballot Box: How the Performance of OUR Presidents Has Impacted YOUR Wallet by Bob
Deitrick and Lew Goldfarb.
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