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Yo Bum Rush the Show


Price: $7.40 & FREE Shipping on orders over $35. Details
Includes FREE MP3 version of this album.
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49 new from $1.83 40 used from $1.10 1 collectible from $11.99
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Audio CD, May 2, 1995
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Listen to Samples and Buy MP3s

Songs from this album are available to purchase as MP3s. Click on "Buy MP3" or view the MP3 Album.
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                         

Samples
Song Title Time Price
listen  1. You're Gonna Get Yours 4:04$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  2. Sophisticated Bitch [Explicit] 4:30$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  3. Miuzi Weighs A Ton 5:44$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  4. Timebomb 2:54$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  5. Too Much Posse 2:25$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  6. Rightstarter (Message To A Black Man) 3:48$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  7. Public Enemy No.1 4:41$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  8. M.P.E. 3:44$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen  9. Yo! Bum Rush The Show 4:25$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen10. Raise The Roof 5:18$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen11. Megablast 2:51$1.29  Buy MP3 
listen12. Terminator X Speaks With His Hands 2:13$1.29  Buy MP3 

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Biography

Until Public Enemy, hip-hop was wrapped up in gold chains, fast women and being top dog in rap throwdowns. But with the group's rise, hip-hop gained a social and political consciousness. Emphasizing pride and condemning prejudice, Public Enemy became the most influential and controversial rap group of its time, hailed by history and by all who have since followed.

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Frequently Bought Together

Yo Bum Rush the Show + It Takes a Nation of Millions + Fear of a Black Planet
Price for all three: $21.89

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Product Details

  • Audio CD (May 2, 1995)
  • Number of Discs: 1
  • Label: Def Jam
  • ASIN: B0000024JZ
  • Average Customer Review: 4.4 out of 5 stars  See all reviews (41 customer reviews)
  • Amazon Best Sellers Rank: #11,327 in Music (See Top 100 in Music)

Editorial Reviews

Amazon.com

With Yo! Bum Rush the Show, Public Enemy introduce a new kind of bravado that's not just directed at other players and sucker MCs but is an out-and-out middle-finger challenge to the whole world, as these serious brothers roll right over you in a slow-moving convoy of 98 Oldsmobiles ("You're Gonna Get Yours"). PE crowd these tracks with disparate sounds that move your butt while they buzz from every channel. Despite their serious posturing, you'll be grateful for the sloppy bass line in "Timebomb" and Terminator X's brilliant tone experiment, "Public Enemy No. 1." Yo! isn't PE's masterpiece, but it's a truly standout album, a warning shot for the full-scale assault they would later initiate on It Takes a Nation of Millions to Hold Us Back. --Todd Levin

Product Description

Customer Reviews

4.4 out of 5 stars
5 star
25
4 star
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1 star
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See all 41 customer reviews
In closing Public Enemy's Yo!
Nuisance
Definitely a good buy if you like rap, hip hop and PE or just want to pump some old school classic rap.
Matthew
This is the first album in a THREE STRAIGHT series of classic albums.
Wayne Maye

Most Helpful Customer Reviews

12 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Mike J on April 19, 2005
Format: Audio CD
While It Takes A Nation of Millions was catapulted into the upper eschelon of hip-hop, Yo! Bum Rush the Show remains widely unrecognized by the general public. Why it is largely ignored remains a mystery to this reviewer. In some aspects, Bum Rush is superior to Nation of Millions.

For example, Bum Rush is a straight up hip-hop record peppered with a message here and there. The rage which is so often the focus of Nation of Millions is present but with a little more diversity in subject matter that creates a more well rounded listen. What do I mean? Take the first track "You're Gonna Get Yours" which is Chuck D's ode to both his crew and his vehicle of choice. The significance of this record is that Chuck, believe it or not, had been rhyming since 77 and this style more exemplified his history. Unless you are really up on your hip-hop or were lucky enough to catch PE in it's earliest incarnations, this example may be hard to follow.

This track, however, is not an isolated incident. "Sophisticated B*tch" represents a misogynistic side to Chuck D where he attacks females that are of an uppity nature, (a side never visited by PE again due to it's negativity). "Public Enemy #1" also represents a time before Public Enemy were even called Public Enemy as the song was a favorite on Hank Shocklee's college radio show and this track is actually the birth of the name. Bum Rush represents a fusion of the old and the new PE.

The new PE would be the politically aware side. Tracks like "Myuziweighsaton" (my personal favorite), "MPE", and "Rightstarter" represent the side of PE that would become their focus on the following albums. My Uzi shows the "quite hostile" style that Chuck would embody perhaps more vehemently and threateningly than in later releases.
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11 of 12 people found the following review helpful By Eric Ripoli on May 3, 2003
Format: Audio CD
This is one of the most underrated ground-breaking rap albums of all time. These guys came out with this album, with a sound so unheard of and unique at the time. I can still remember blasting these classics out of my car with my buddies as we smoothly cruised down the street. Any true rap fan must own this album. This is a true classic. Listen to it several times and you won't stop playing it.
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9 of 10 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 27, 2000
Format: Audio CD
Yo! Bum Rush the show is one of the very best rap CDs that I have purchased during my lifetime. This album would easily rank within the 10 or 15 best rap albums ever made. I am a big fan of Public Enemy, and I think that the lyrics on this CD are brilliant and thought provoking. On Yo! Bum Rush the Show, the best song is clearly Public Enemy No. 1, but all of the other songs are almost as good. The sound of this album is very similar to that on Nation of Millions, and , thus, if you liked that CD, you will probably like this one too.
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6 of 6 people found the following review helpful By IhateMTV on December 7, 2004
Format: Audio CD
1987's "Yo! Bum Rush The Show" is probably one of the more underrated hip-hop debuts of the 80's. Most people tend to compare it to the three classic albums that P.E. would release after this, which is a big mistake. If you're looking for another "It Takes A Nation of Millions To Hold Us Back" or "Fear of a Black Planet", you'll be disappointed. Simply put, "Yo! Bum Rush The Show" is in a league of it's own. Chuck D.'s flow, along with P.E.'s overall sound on "Yo!..." is reminiscent of other old-school rap groups, most notably Run-D.M.C. Like Run-D.M.C., a lot of the songs are dominated by an impressive display of turntablism, but what really made Public Enemy stand out was Chuck D.'s revolutionary lyrics and Flava Flav's outbursts. Overall, "Yo! Bum Rush the Show" is a good representation of the golden age of rap, although it doesn't compare to the next three albums the group would release. Still, this is a fantastic debut from one of hip-hop's greatest groups.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By The Groove on June 5, 2002
Format: Audio CD
This CD was released when hip hop really mattered, and is one of the most vital releases of the genre. Chuck D's flow is bursting with urgency, and the beats are slammin'. "My Uzi Weighs a Ton," "You're Gonna get Yours," and "Time Bomb" are off the chain! PE would release 2 more classics before they faded out of the spotlight, but their influence on hip hop is incalculable. Maybe if some of these modern artists stopped talking about gettin' paid and follow PE's example, the state of modern hip hop wouldn't be in the sorry state it's in.
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5 of 5 people found the following review helpful By A Customer on October 7, 1999
Format: Audio CD
The first and the best from PE. Anyone who is anyone already has it. Rough, raw beats with slick lyrics from Chuck thrown in with Flav's crazy style gave PE the originality which has seen them survive nearly 14 years in hip-hop. If you don't have it...get it. If you do, stop playing on your computer and go and listen to it!
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3 of 3 people found the following review helpful By Amazon Customer on October 4, 2009
Format: Audio CD
I don't want to sound like a negative nancy, but I'm not actually a huge fan of most of Public Enemy's more famous records. IT TAKES A NATION OF MILLIONS TO HOLD US BACK and FEAR OF A BLACK PLANET are the albums where PE built their legend, but I find it tough to get into them. This debut album, however: it sends chills down my spine when I hear it. It's clear that the group wouldn't have achieved their place in history without moving away from this sound, but I still love it way more than everything else they've ever done.

Unlike all the rest of their work, Yo! Bum Rush the Show is a true Def Jam album that sounds very much of its time. Produced by Rick Rubin, it's part of his trilogy of truly great hip hop records from the 80's (the other two being the Beastie Boys' LICENSED TO ILL and Run-D.M.C.'s RAISING HELL), and all three of them share a similar aesthetic: production that mimics the hard-hitting feel of heavy rock, with occasional guitars woven into the sound, and drums mixed more for rocking out than dancing. Of the three, Public Enemy seem to be straining against this sound the most, since at the time both the Beastie Boys and Run-D.M.C. were in the heyday of their "rap rock" period, and PE are hip hop through and through. So the group and the producer are working slightly at cross-purposes, but the tension results in some true classics, like "Miuzi Weighs a Ton", where it's difficult to tell which is more aggressive: the percussion, the furious scratching, or Chuck D's strident raps. Then there's "Too Much Posse", where Flavor Flav demonstrates that he's always been the comic relief of the group, but he wasn't always a joke. "Raise the Roof", the title track, the would-be theme song "Public Enemy No.
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